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Charlamagne Annihilates Biden, Sinema and Manchin on voting rights

Radio host Charlamagne tha God has said President Joe Biden together with Democratic centrist Senators Joe Manchin from West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema from Arizona are ‘responsible for the death of the Democratic Party.’ 

Speaking on his radio show, The Breakfast Club, he proclaimed the trio to be the ‘Donkey of The Day’ after a push to change the Senate filibuster to pass election reform legislation was defeated in the week. 

‘These three are collectively responsible for the death of the Democratic Party as we know it,’ Charlamagne said. 

‘People are asking if we are witnessing the death of of democracy in America? Well guess what, if it is, which I believe it is, for some of us, these three are to blame.’

Charlamagne tha God said on his radio show that  President Joe Bide and Democratic centrist Senators Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema are to blame for the ‘death of democracy’

Democrats needed 60 votes in order to end debate and initiate a vote on the legislation that would overhaul U.S. voting laws.

The package combined two separate legislative items that were already passed by the House — the Freedom to Vote Act and the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act. The bills would make Election Day a holiday, adjust the redistricting process and crack down on money in politics. 

Despite a day of piercing debate and speeches that often carried echoes of an earlier era when the Senate filibuster was deployed by opponents of civil rights legislation, Democrats could not persuade holdout senators Sinema and Manchin to change the Senate procedures on this one bill and allow a simple majority to advance it.

Charlamagne compared the defeat of filibuster reform to the boneheaded loss suffered by the Dallas Cowboys in last Sunday’s NFL playoff game against the San Francisco 49ers. The Cowboys trailed 23-17 and were driving for the lead in the final seconds when they ran out of time before the final snap. 

Arizona Senator Kyrsten Sinema walks outside Senate chamber before casting her No vote to end filibuster

Arizona Senator Kyrsten Sinema walks outside Senate chamber before casting her No vote to end filibuster

Democratic Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia fields phone call before casting his vote against eliminating the filibuster

Democratic Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia fields phone call before casting his vote against eliminating the filibuster

‘I thought that would be the dumbest finish I would see this week, but President Biden said, ‘Hold my prune juice!” he said making the comparison.

On the issue of voting rights and the black vote, Charlamagne then blasted Biden for not making it priority when he took office exactly one year ago. 

‘After the attempted coup of this country on January 6th, that should have been his first order of business. Protecting voter rights,’ Charlamagne stated before accusing the president of not caring about the voting rights of black people. 

‘Why can’t President Biden call out Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema for blocking his agenda when them blocking his agenda is actually hurting the American people? If you ask me it’s because he don’t care. Black people voting is simply not a priority for Biden, Manchin, or Sinema,’ he said.

‘It’s a matter of white privilege for Biden. He failed to give this issue the attention it deserves because he simply can’t relate.’ 

On the issue of voting rights and the black vote, Charlamagne then blasted Biden for not making it priority when he took office (file photo from March 2021)

On the issue of voting rights and the black vote, Charlamagne then blasted Biden for not making it priority when he took office (file photo from March 2021)

Biden said he would not be deterred from continuing to push for getting voting rights legislation passed. 

‘My Administration will never stop fighting to ensure that the heart and soul of our democracy — the right to vote — is protected at all costs,’ he wrote in his Wednesday statement following the vote. ‘We will continue to work with allies to advance necessary legislation to protect the right to vote. And to push for Senate procedural changes that will protect the fundamental right to vote.’

Manchin and Sinema effectively tanked the Democrats’ marquee bill Wednesday, joining Republicans in voting against a rule change that would have allowed the party’s voting legislation to pass with a simple majority. 

‘I am profoundly disappointed that the United States Senate has failed to stand up for our democracy. I am disappointed — but I am not deterred,’ the president wrote in a statement late Wednesday. 

President Joe Biden, who blasted Republicans as obstructionists during press conference on Wednesday, posted tweet (below) shortly after Democrats failed to push through his agenda

President Joe Biden, who blasted Republicans as obstructionists during press conference on Wednesday, posted tweet (below) shortly after Democrats failed to push through his agenda

 

Biden was handed another blow as Democratic centrist Senators Joe Manchin from West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema from Arizona joined all 50 Republicans to thwart their own party in changing Senate rules to overcome a Republican filibuster after a raw, emotional debate. 

The defeat comes as midterm campaigns commence and Democrats try to hold onto their razor-thin majorities in the House and Senate.

It saw Democrats left licking their wounds following the collapse of their top-priority voting rights legislation, with some now shifting their focus to a narrower bipartisan effort to repair laws Donald Trump exploited in his bid to overturn the 2020 election.

Though their bid to dramatically rewrite U.S. election law failed during a high-stakes Senate floor showdown late on Wednesday night, Democrats insist their brinkmanship will make a new effort possible, forcing Republicans to relent, even if just a little, and engage in bipartisan negotiations. 

Majority Whip Jim Clyburn, D-S.C., alongside other members of the Congressional Black Caucus, stands in front of the Senate chambers to voice his support of voting rights legislation at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022. (AP Photo/Amanda Andrade-Rhoades)

Majority Whip Jim Clyburn, D-S.C., alongside other members of the Congressional Black Caucus, stands in front of the Senate chambers to voice his support of voting rights legislation at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022. (AP Photo/Amanda Andrade-Rhoades)

Meanwhile, Trump loyalists are girding for the next election, working to install sympathetic leaders in local election posts and, in some cases, backing political candidates who participated in the riot at the U.S. Capitol.

Biden conceded this week that updating the electoral bill may be Democrats’ best opportunity to pass voting legislation through a 50-50 Senate, where much of his agenda has stalled.

‘I predict to you they´ll get something done,’ Biden told reporters Wednesday.

Any legislation would have to balance Democrats´ desire to halt what they view as a GOP plan to make it more difficult for black Americans and other minorities to vote with Republican’s entrenched opposition to increased federal oversight of local elections.

Democrats' hopes to pass voting rights bill by ending filibuster rules went down in flames

Democrats’ hopes to pass voting rights bill by ending filibuster rules went down in flames

‘What other things could be put in there?’ said South Carolina Rep. Jim Clyburn, the No. 3 House Democrat and a senior member of the Congressional Black Caucus. ‘I want to deal with more than just counting the votes for the president. I want to be sure that we count the votes for everybody else. So voter nullification like they´re doing in Georgia, I think it can be addressed.’

Republicans involved in the effort to update the Electoral Count Act acknowledge that the bill would need a wider focus.

Sen. Susan Collins of Maine is holding bipartisan talks with Republican Sens. Roger Wicker of Mississippi, Thom Tillis of North Carolina and Mitt Romney of Utah, as well as Democratic Sens. Joe Manchin of West Virginia, Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona.

‘It´s such a needed thing,’ said Manchin, who added that the narrower scope was ‘the first place’ Democrats ‘should have started.’


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