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Christine McGuinness displays her toy-strewn home as she jokes it’s ‘pointless’ having a playroom 

She’s a doting mother to her three autistic children, twins Penelope and Leo, seven, and four-year-old Felicity.

And Christine McGuinness shared a glimpse into her quiet weekend at home as she posted a snap of her toy-strewn house to Instagram on Saturday.

The model, 32, who is married to comedian Paddy McGuinness, 47, also joked that it is ‘pointless’ having a playroom as kids will leave their toys ‘absolutely everywhere’.

Doting mum: Christine McGuinness displayed her toy strewn home as she revealed the post-playtime mess made by her three children on Instagram on Saturday

Christine looked fantastic as she rocked a pale pink loungewear set and matching slippers while posing surrounded by her childrens’ toys. 

The blonde beauty beamed a smile as she cradled Felicity’s doll during playtime, looking every inch the doting mum. 

She penned: ‘I’m on babysitting duties.. for the dolls!… and if I don’t take this seriously Felicity will lose her mind so I better just look really happy about this.

‘Also.. there is absolutely no point in having a play room because they put their toys everywhere apart from the playroom! But it’s a happy house so I can’t complain!’

Everything out: Prams, dolls and a mini ironing board could be seen on the white floor as the model joked about it being 'absolutely pointless' having a playroom

Everything out: Prams, dolls and a mini ironing board could be seen on the white floor as the model joked about it being ‘absolutely pointless’ having a playroom 

Quality time: She added that she can't complain about the mess as her home is a 'happy house'

Quality time: She added that she can’t complain about the mess as her home is a ‘happy house’

Christine also took to Instagram Stories to talk some more about the happy mess which had been created during Saturday’s playing. 

She hilarious said: ‘Just in case you’re thinking of moving house soon or redecorating and are thinking “oh I’ll give my kids a lovely playroom, a place for them and all their toys” don’t bother.

‘Give yourself the room with some nice candles and a nice sofa and make it an adults only room. There’s no point in giving your kids a playroom. I mean they’re [toys] everywhere you look. Absolutely everywhere.’

Spinning the camera around to reveal the floor, Christine showed that the childrens’ dolls and prams as well as a mini ironing board and Peppa Pig toy had been left out.

Siblings: Christine is mum to twins Penelope and Leo, seven, and four-year-old Felicity

Siblings: Christine is mum to twins Penelope and Leo, seven, and four-year-old Felicity

'They're everywhere!': She showed another doll had been abandoned on the floor

‘They’re everywhere!’: She showed another doll had been abandoned on the floor

It comes after she revealed her children have become ‘more physical’ with her and each other as she detailed how they have changed during lockdown

Taking to Instagram on Tuesday, Christine shared a reassuring text she sent to a fellow SEN (special educational needs) mum, detailing how she ‘barely recognises’ her children at times, before positively adding that the difficult time ‘will pass.’ 

Christine has always been open about her children’s highs and lows in living with autism, often sharing her experiences and giving advice and support to parents in the same boat. 

And Christine once again gave an honest insight into raising children who are on the spectrum as she detailed how lockdown was going for her family, adding that other SEN families are ‘not alone’. 

Keep it for you! Christine told her followers to ditch any playroom ideas and instead make themselves a lovely relaxing space

Keep it for you! Christine told her followers to ditch any playroom ideas and instead make themselves a lovely relaxing space

Sharing a sympathetic text she sent to one mum, she said: ‘I totally understand, all three of mine have got more physical with me and each other recently it’s awful. 

‘I barely recognise them sometimes and I just paint a smile on like everything is fine. Thinking of you lots, stay strong. This time will pass.’

Alongside the image she shared a lengthy caption in which she further detailed her kids’ changes, while also sharing a message of support to everyone affected by the pandemic.

She penned: ‘Day 1 : Lockdown 3. This may or may not help anyone but this is ‘real life’ I just want to let my SEN families know you are not alone, I hear you, I understand. 

Message: It comes after Christine revealed that her three autistic children have become 'more physical' with her and each other during lockdown and shared the reassuring text she sent to a fellow SEN (special educational needs) mum

Message: It comes after Christine revealed that her three autistic children have become ‘more physical’ with her and each other during lockdown and shared the reassuring text she sent to a fellow SEN (special educational needs) mum

Honest: 'I totally understand, all three of mine have got more physical with me and each other recently it's awful'

Honest: ‘I totally understand, all three of mine have got more physical with me and each other recently it’s awful’

‘For me personally I feel good, I am very head strong and I love to stay positive but I can’t deny what these lockdowns are doing to my children. my children are not the same little people they were this time last year.’

She went on: ‘The pandemic is affecting everyone differently, wether it’s your business, your mental health, a loss of life.. Covid is hitting everyone hard in different ways it’s heartbreaking. I pray every day, I hope it passes soon.

‘Thinking of you all, sending love and light to each and every one of you ❤️⠀

(This is a message I sent to one of my SEN mummy friends this morning) In it together.’ [sic]   

It comes after Christine shared an insight into her family Christmas last month, explaining what her three autistic children eat for their festive lunch.

'Not alone': Alongside the image she shared a lengthy caption in which she further detailed her kids' changes, while also sharing a message of support to everyone affected by the pandemic

‘Not alone’: Alongside the image she shared a lengthy caption in which she further detailed her kids’ changes, while also sharing a message of support to everyone affected by the pandemic

Choosing her battles: Christine shared an insight into her family Christmas last month, explaining what her three autistic children eat for their festive lunch

Choosing her battles: Christine shared an insight into her family Christmas last month, explaining what her three autistic children eat for their festive lunch

Foregoing turkey with all the trimmings, they opted for kid-friendly fish fingers and chips. 

Christine posted a snap of their meal on Instagram, captioning it: ‘Autism doesn’t stop for Christmas day! They like what they like and I want my children to eat so I choose my battles and I don’t want one today!

‘For anyone who may not understand this, food aversion can be quite common for those with autism. This isn’t lazy parenting or fussy children, this is sensory issues due to their condition that limits what our children eat. I am delighted they are very slowly exploring new textures.

‘I’m just happy they eat because there have been times they totally refuse.It may be basic and it’s still all beige but they’re happy and their tummies are full.

‘For anyone with autistic children this Christmas… I hope you had a calm day, I feel your exhaustion and I hear your sigh of relief that the Christmas period is almost over.’  [sic]

Alt Christmas: Foregoing turkey with all the trimmings, the kids opted for kid-friendly fish fingers and chips

Alt Christmas: Foregoing turkey with all the trimmings, the kids opted for kid-friendly fish fingers and chips

THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF AUTISM

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, people with autism have trouble with social, emotional and communication skills that usually develop before the age of three and last throughout a person’s life. 

Specific signs of autism include: 

  • Reactions to smell, taste, look, feel or sound are unusual
  • Difficulty adapting to changes in routine
  • Unable to repeat or echo what is said to them
  • Difficulty expressing desires using words or motions
  • Unable to discuss their own feelings or other people’s
  • Difficulty with acts of affection like hugging
  • Prefer to be alone and avoid eye contact
  • Difficulty relating to other people
  • Unable to point at objects or look at objects when others point to them


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