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Harry Redknapp, 74, visits West Ham fan with terminal cancer in care home

Harry Redknapp, 74, visits West Ham fan with terminal cancer in care home after staff spotted footballing legend driving through Bournemouth

Football legend Harry Redknapp paid a visit to a fan with terminal cancer in June after the sports star was randomly seen driving through Bournemouth.

The manager of Bupa’s Queensmount Care Home spotted the former I’m A Celebrity winner, 74, at the vets where they asked him to stop by and meet life-long West Ham fan Frank McHale. 

Speaking during the visit, Harry said: ‘Yes, I’m here today, the care home manager chased me yesterday at the vets when I was taking Barney, saying we’ve got a fantastic man called Frank, who is a big West Ham fan and would love to meet you. 

Surprise! Football legend Harry Redknapp paid a visit to a fan with terminal cancer in June after the sports star was randomly seen driving through Bournemouth (pictured in 2019) 

‘I said “not a problem, I’d love to meet Frank,” so I’ve come along today. I’ve got to be truthful, this is amazing. I can’t believe the atmosphere in here – it really is special, the people are so friendly.

‘It’s just not what I expected, it’s amazing and the staff and everybody are just incredible people. 

‘Frank is a great guy. I’m so pleased I could take the time to come and chat to him today.’ 

Fan: The manager of Bupa's Queensmount Care Home spotted the former I'm A Celebrity winner, 74, at the vets where they asked him to stop by and meet life-long West Ham fan Frank McHale (pictured together)

Fan: The manager of Bupa’s Queensmount Care Home spotted the former I’m A Celebrity winner, 74, at the vets where they asked him to stop by and meet life-long West Ham fan Frank McHale (pictured together)  

Frank, 57, has been living at the home since May, following a terminal diagnosis of lung sarcoma – a rare type of cancer.

During the visit, the pair took time to talk about football and family, sharing their favourite stories about West Ham, while also talking about what had drawn them both to Bournemouth.

Born and raised in London, Frank is one of seven siblings – all of who supported rival club, Queens Park Rangers.

However, Sir Bobby Moore caught Frank’s interest as a youngster, leading him to break the family tradition and become a lifelong West Ham fan.

Harry said of the visit: 'Frank is a great guy. I'm so pleased I could take the time to come and chat to him today.'

Harry said of the visit: ‘Frank is a great guy. I’m so pleased I could take the time to come and chat to him today.’  

Speaking about the visit, Frank said: ‘Meeting Harry gave me a huge boost. I never thought I’d meet him like this, and it was amazing to reminisce about the Hammers and share stories about living in Bournemouth. He is a such a great bloke.’

And the meeting would not have come about if it wasn’t for quick-thinking staff who spotted Harry out and about in town.

Claudia Carvell, manager at the care home, explained: ‘Whether they’re with us for weeks or years, our job is to make residents smile.

VIP visitor: As well as chatting with Frank, Harry (centre) also took time to meet staff at the home – thanking them for everything they do for local residents

VIP visitor: As well as chatting with Frank, Harry (centre) also took time to meet staff at the home – thanking them for everything they do for local residents

‘Frank is a huge West Ham fan so, when I saw Harry in town, I knew I had to ask him to visit. He must have thought I was crazy as I ran down the street to catch him, but I hadn’t even finished explaining before he agreed.

‘Harry was wonderful and the visit has had a huge impact on Frank – he’s been beaming ever since.’

As well as chatting with Frank, Harry also took time to meet staff at the home – thanking them for everything they do for local residents.

Harry previously played for West Ham during his footballing career and also managed the club later in his life.    

He's a champ! Harry was crowned the winner of I'm A Celebrity... Get Me Out of Here! in 2018, he previously played for West Ham during his footballing career and also managed the club later in his life

He’s a champ! Harry was crowned the winner of I’m A Celebrity… Get Me Out of Here! in 2018, he previously played for West Ham during his footballing career and also managed the club later in his life 

WHAT IS LUNG CANCER?

Lung cancer is one of the most common and serious types of cancer. 

Around 47,000 people are diagnosed with the condition every year in the UK.

There are usually no signs or symptoms in the early stages of lung cancer, but many people with the condition eventually develop symptoms including:

– a persistent cough

– coughing up blood

– persistent breathlessness

– unexplained tiredness and weight loss

– an ache or pain when breathing or coughing

You should see a GP if you have these symptoms.

Types of lung cancer 

There are two main forms of primary lung cancer. 

These are classified by the type of cells in which the cancer starts growing. 

They are:

– Non-small-cell lung cancer. The most common form, accounting for more than 87 per cent of cases. 

– It can be one of three types: squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma or large-cell carcinoma.

– Small-cell lung cancer – a less common form that usually spreads faster than non-small-cell lung cancer.

– The type of lung cancer you have determines which treatments are recommended.

Who’s affected

Lung cancer mainly affects older people. It’s rare in people younger than 40. 

More than four out of 10 people diagnosed with lung cancer in the UK are aged 75 and older.

Although people who have never smoked can develop lung cancer, smoking is the most common cause (accounting for about 72 per cent of cases). 

This is because smoking involves regularly inhaling a number of different toxic substances.

Treating lung cancer

Treatment depends on the type of mutation the cancer has, how far it’s spread and how good your general health is.

If the condition is diagnosed early and the cancerous cells are confined to a small area, surgery to remove the affected area of lung may be recommended.

If surgery is unsuitable due to your general health, radiotherapy to destroy the cancerous cells may be recommended instead.

If the cancer has spread too far for surgery or radiotherapy to be effective, chemotherapy is usually used.

There are also a number of medicines known as targeted therapies. 

They target a specific change in or around the cancer cells that is helping them to grow. 

Targeted therapies cannot cure lung cancer but they can slow its spread.

Source: NHS 

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