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John Lydon picks up groceries in Malibu as he prepares to leave wife Nora for book tour

John Lydon was seen heading to his local supermarket to pick up groceries in Malibu on Thursday, as he prepares to leave wife Nora at home to begin his UK book tour.

The Sex Pistols star, 65, has been caring for his wife since she was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, and previously said it will be ‘full of heartache’ to leave her in LA.

John cut a casual figure in one of his signature printed shirts and a medical face mask as he headed to the market to stock up on groceries.

Solo: John Lydon, 65, was seen heading to his local supermarket to pick up groceries in Malibu on Thursday, as he prepares to leave his beloved wife Nora at home to begin his UK book tour

John was seen loading his purchases into his parked car, along with multiple bottles of Mountain Dew as he prepared to travel back to the UK to begin his book tour.

The 70s hitmaker first revealed his wife’s devastating diagnosis back in 2018, and is set to tour his book I Could Be Wrong, I Could be Right from September 7 after being forced to postpone it for a year due to Covid.

Speaking to The Mirror last week he said: ‘It’s gonna involve a lot of heartache. I need to have monitors in the home.

‘Being away for lengths of time will be tough and I need to make that as brief as possible.’

Low-key: The Sex Pistols hitmaker cut a casual figure in one of his signature printed shirts and a medical face mask as he headed to the market to stock up on groceries

Low-key: The Sex Pistols hitmaker cut a casual figure in one of his signature printed shirts and a medical face mask as he headed to the market to stock up on groceries

John added: ‘You can’t take situations like my domestic situation on the road, it’s not gonna work. I’ve tried and it drove everybody insane.’

He told how Nora now needs ’24/7 attention’ with her condition, adding: ‘That’s my duty and I’m more than happy to do that. It’s difficult when there’s a workload, but I have to cope with it.’

The former frontman also said he finds Nora’s struggle a ‘strange blessing’ because it’s brought them closer together and he’s learned a lot about himself.

Difficult: John has previously admitted it will be 'tough' leaving his wife Nora who has Alzheimer's at home when he goes on UK book tour next month (pictured in 2017)

Difficult: John has previously admitted it will be ‘tough’ leaving his wife Nora who has Alzheimer’s at home when he goes on UK book tour next month (pictured in 2017)

Loving: The singer married the German publishing heiress, 78, in 1979 and first revealed his wife's devastating diagnosis in 2018

Loving: The singer married the German publishing heiress, 78, in 1979 and first revealed his wife’s devastating diagnosis in 2018

Earlier this year John candidly discussed becoming a full-time carer for his wife Nora.

The star said that he has now accepted that his beloved wife’s condition is ‘incurable’ and will ‘never improve’.

Speaking to The Times he explained how her Alzheimer’s is a ‘wicked and debilitating’ disease and, although she forgets most things, she ‘doesn’t forget me’.

He said: ‘Alzheimer’s is a wicked, debilitating, slow, deliberate process, but we’re going through that together. She doesn’t forget me. She forgets everything else but not me.’

Work: John is touring his book I Could Be Wrong, I Could be Right from September 7 after being forced to postpone it for a year due to Covid (pictured together in 1984)

Work: John is touring his book I Could Be Wrong, I Could be Right from September 7 after being forced to postpone it for a year due to Covid (pictured together in 1984) 

He added: ‘I know it’s going to deteriorate into something really, really terrible, but we’re facing it with a sense of dignity.

‘I mean, it would be easy enough to run away and say, “Oh, it’s not my responsibility; things aren’t the same”. B***cks to that.’

The icon went on to explain that when he made a commitment to her it was ‘forever’ and that he still stands by that, adding that he is ‘proud to do the best I can for her.’ 

In the interview he detailed how there isn’t a huge amount of help available for her type of illness and that its progression is still a ‘huge unknown’.  

Candid: Speaking to The Mirror he said: 'It's gonna involve a lot of heartache. I need to have monitors in the home (pictured in 2005)

Candid: Speaking to The Mirror he said: ‘It’s gonna involve a lot of heartache. I need to have monitors in the home (pictured in 2005) 

John said that she carries a pink teddy for comfort and gets disorientated easily if she is in a new place, but that they spend quality time together at home watching comedies to keep her brain ‘alert’. 

He went on to say that as a full-time carer you can get ‘quite suicidal’ and there are moments when he is ‘overwhelmingly sad’ but that he just has to accept it.     

The couple never had children but John became stepfather to her daughter Ariane, The Slits singer Ari Up.

John believes Nora showed the first signs of Alzheimer’s after Ariane died of breast cancer 11 years ago, at the age of 48.

WHAT IS DEMENTIA? THE KILLER DISEASE THAT ROBS SUFFERERS OF THEIR MEMORIES

Dementia is an umbrella term used to describe a range of neurological disorders

Dementia is an umbrella term used to describe a range of neurological disorders

A GLOBAL CONCERN 

Dementia is an umbrella term used to describe a range of progressive neurological disorders (those affecting the brain) which impact memory, thinking and behaviour. 

There are many different types of dementia, of which Alzheimer’s disease is the most common.

Some people may have a combination of types of dementia.

Regardless of which type is diagnosed, each person will experience their dementia in their own unique way.

Dementia is a global concern but it is most often seen in wealthier countries, where people are likely to live into very old age.

HOW MANY PEOPLE ARE AFFECTED?

The Alzheimer’s Society reports there are more than 850,000 people living with dementia in the UK today, of which more than 500,000 have Alzheimer’s.

It is estimated that the number of people living with dementia in the UK by 2025 will rise to over 1 million.

In the US, it’s estimated there are 5.5 million Alzheimer’s sufferers. A similar percentage rise is expected in the coming years.

As a person’s age increases, so does the risk of them developing dementia.

Rates of diagnosis are improving but many people with dementia are thought to still be undiagnosed.

IS THERE A CURE?

Currently there is no cure for dementia.

But new drugs can slow down its progression and the earlier it is spotted the more effective treatments are.

Source: Alzheimer’s Society 


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