Entertainment

Katherine Heigl signs on to play Victoria Woodhull, the first woman ever to run for President

Katherine Heigl signs on to play Victoria Woodhull, the first woman ever to run for President of the United States in new limited series

Katherine Heigl is returning to the small screen in a big way, portraying historical figure Victorial Woodhull in the new limited series Woodhull.

The series, which hails from Oakhurst Entertainment, will follow the life of Woodhull, who became the first woman to run for President of the United States in 1872.

She ran under the Equal Rights Party, with famed abolitionist Frederick Douglass as her running mate. 

New role: Katherine Heigl is returning to the small screen in a big way, portraying historical figure Victorial Woodhull in the new limited series Woodhull

Historic: The series, which hails from Oakhurst Entertainment, will follow the life of Woodhull, who became the first woman to run for President of the United States in 1872.

Historic: The series, which hails from Oakhurst Entertainment, will follow the life of Woodhull, who became the first woman to run for President of the United States in 1872.

Heigl will portray the title character and also serve as executive producer on the project, which is currently out to showrunners.

While no creator has been named, the project will be based on multiple biographies of Woodhull, which Oakhurst Entertainment, founded by Jai Khanna and Marina Grasic, optioned earlier this year.

Woodhull was also the first female ever to address the United States Congress and, with her sister Tennessee, was the first woman to run a brokerage firm on Wall Street.

Star and producer: Heigl will portray the title character and also serve as executive producer on the project, which is currently out to showrunners

Star and producer: Heigl will portray the title character and also serve as executive producer on the project, which is currently out to showrunners

Groundbreaker: Woodhull was also the first female ever to address the United States Congress and, with her sister Tennessee, was the first woman to run a brokerage firm on Wall Street

Groundbreaker: Woodhull was also the first female ever to address the United States Congress and, with her sister Tennessee, was the first woman to run a brokerage firm on Wall Street

The sisters founded their own newspaper – Woodhull & Claflin’s Weekly – in 1870, which would land her in jail just days before the election. 

Woodhull published a rather provocative piece in her paper detailing an adulterous affair between prominent preacher Henry Ward Beecher and Elizabeth Richards Tilton.

Since the piece had more salacious details than was considered appropriate at the time, the sisters were arrested on obscenity charges.

Newspaper: The sisters founded their own newspaper - Woodhull & Claflin's Weekly - in 1870, which would land her in jail just days before the election

Newspaper: The sisters founded their own newspaper – Woodhull & Claflin’s Weekly – in 1870, which would land her in jail just days before the election

This lead Congress to pass what became known as the Comstock Laws in 1873, governing obscene content.

She was a staunch women’s rights activist although she frequently clashes with noted feminists such as Susan B. Anthony and other notable figures like Cornelius Vanderbilt and Harriet Beecher Stowe.

This project is said to not just focus Woodhull’s life, but is described as ‘the story of the time in which she lived’ along with the famous and infamous lives she touched.

Story of a time: This project is said to not just focus Woodhull's life, but is described as 'the story of the time in which she lived' along with the famous and infamous lives she touched

Story of a time: This project is said to not just focus Woodhull’s life, but is described as ‘the story of the time in which she lived’ along with the famous and infamous lives she touched

‘The moment I discovered the almost too big to be true story of Victoria I have been enthralled and deeply invested in bringing her life story to the screen,’ Heigl said in a statement.

‘Victoria’s outrageous courage, determination, intelligence and hutzpah would be remarkable in our modern times but was downright revolutionary in hers. Her name and her story has not been celebrated nearly enough for the trails she blazed and the paths she forged for all the women who came after her,’ she added. 

‘I cannot wait to tell the story of this woman who would not be stopped in a time that forbade her to even start,’ Heigl concluded.

Invested: 'The moment I discovered the almost too big to be true story of Victoria I have been enthralled and deeply invested in bringing her life story to the screen,' Heigl said in a statement

Invested: ‘The moment I discovered the almost too big to be true story of Victoria I have been enthralled and deeply invested in bringing her life story to the screen,’ Heigl said in a statement

Cannot wait: 'I cannot wait to tell the story of this woman who would not be stopped in a time that forbade her to even start,' Heigl concluded

Cannot wait: ‘I cannot wait to tell the story of this woman who would not be stopped in a time that forbade her to even start,’ Heigl concluded

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