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Kylie Moore-Gilbert enjoys a sausage sizzle at Bunnings after Iranian prison hell

The taste of freedom: Australian academic Kylie Moore-Gilbert – who spent two years in a hellhole Iranian jail only to find out her husband was having an affair when she got home – enjoys a sausage sizzle at Bunnings

Kylie Moore-Gilbert was imprisoned in Iran for more than two years before being freed in a prisoner-swap deal brokered by Australia’s top spy.

And the 35-year-old academic looked happy to be home on Sunday as she visited a Bunnings Warehouse in Melbourne.

Moore-Gilbert, who spent 804 days behind bars before her release in November 2020, wore a striped shirt and black jeans as she walked through the hardware store.

The taste of freedom: Australian academic Kylie Moore-Gilbert, who spent more than two years in an Iranian prison on trumped-up espionage charges, looked happy to be home on Sunday as she visited a Bunnings Warehouse in Melbourne

She completed her look with black sneakers and a matching-coloured bag, and swept her brunette hair into a ponytail.

After buying some household supplies, the Islamic studies lecturer grabbed a snag from the sausage sizzle outside the store.

Moore-Gilbert was imprisoned in Iran from September 2018 to November 2020 after the country’s government falsely accused her of being a ‘Zionist spy’.

Ensemble: Moore-Gilbert, who spent 804 days behind bars before her release in November 2020, wore a striped shirt and black jeans as she walked through the hardware store

Ensemble: Moore-Gilbert, who spent 804 days behind bars before her release in November 2020, wore a striped shirt and black jeans as she walked through the hardware store

Laid-back: She completed her look with black sneakers and a matching-coloured bag, and swept her brunette hair into a ponytail

Laid-back: She completed her look with black sneakers and a matching-coloured bag, and swept her brunette hair into a ponytail 

The prisoner-swap deal that secured her release – and also saw the release of three Iranians held in Thailand – was brokered by the former boss of Australia’s spy agencies ASIS and the Office of National Intelligence, Nick Warner.

Moore-Gilbert was given a 10-year sentence for espionage but always denied the charges, which reportedly stemmed from the Iranian authorities’ belief she was a spy for Israel because of her relationship with her then-husband, an Israeli citizen.

The Australian government rejected the charges as ‘baseless and politically motivated’.

Once she arrived home, she discovered her husband Ruslan Hodorov had moved on with another woman – her former colleague at the University of Melbourne.

Lunch on the go: After buying some household supplies, the Islamic studies lecturer grabbed a snag from the sausage sizzle outside the store

Lunch on the go: After buying some household supplies, the Islamic studies lecturer grabbed a snag from the sausage sizzle outside the store

Freedom: Moore-Gilbert was imprisoned in Iran from September 2018 to November 2020 after the country's government falsely accused her of being a 'Zionist spy'

Freedom: Moore-Gilbert was imprisoned in Iran from September 2018 to November 2020 after the country’s government falsely accused her of being a ‘Zionist spy’

Her mother broke the news while she was in quarantine that her Russian-Israeli husband was having an affair with Dr Kylie Baxter, her former PhD supervisor.

Their relationship began while Moore-Gilbert was held captive in two of Iran’s most notorious prisons.

An ‘upset and disappointed’ Moore-Gilbert filed for divorce shortly after returning home, and announced it was finalised on her Twitter account in April last year.

Deal: The prisoner-swap deal that secured her release - and also saw the release of three Iranians held in Thailand - was brokered by the former boss of Australia's spy agencies ASIS and the Office of National Intelligence, Nick Warner

Deal: The prisoner-swap deal that secured her release – and also saw the release of three Iranians held in Thailand – was brokered by the former boss of Australia’s spy agencies ASIS and the Office of National Intelligence, Nick Warner

Falsely accused: Moore-Gilbert was given a 10-year sentence for espionage but always denied the charges, which reportedly stemmed from the Iranian authorities' belief she was a spy for Israel because of her relationship with her then-husband, an Israeli citizen

Falsely accused: Moore-Gilbert was given a 10-year sentence for espionage but always denied the charges, which reportedly stemmed from the Iranian authorities’ belief she was a spy for Israel because of her relationship with her then-husband, an Israeli citizen

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