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Lisa Curry weighs in on whether the Tokyo Olympics should be CANCELLED over Covid-19

‘I value my life and health more than a race’: Australian swimmer Lisa Curry weighs in on whether the Tokyo Olympics should be CANCELLED over Covid-19 concerns

Lisa Curry is an award-winning swimmer and veteran of three Olympic Games. 

But the athlete would not go to the upcoming Tokyo Olympics – and believes its too big a risk of becoming a Covid-19 super-spreader event. 

In an interview with Stellar on Saturday, the 59-year-old old didn’t mince words when she declared it’s simply not worth it. 

Risky? Lisa Curry is an award-winning swimmer and veteran of three Olympic Games. But the athlete would not go to the upcoming Tokyo Olympics – and believes its too big a risk of becoming a Covid-19 super-spreader event. Pictured with her grandson 

‘Would I go to Tokyo Olympics? Probably not because I value my life and health more than a race,’ Lisa said. ‘It’s an athlete’s dilemma.’

‘At this stage, the Games are still going ahead. The big question is: should the world’s greatest athletes be entering a country that has experienced four waves of the pandemic?’ Lisa added. 

Curry added that as it stands, the Olympics are a ‘bad option’ and she ‘feels really sorry’ for the athletes that are going.   

No way: 'Would I go to Tokyo Olympics? Probably not because I value my life and health more than a race,' Lisa said. 'It's an athlete's dilemma'

No way: ‘Would I go to Tokyo Olympics? Probably not because I value my life and health more than a race,’ Lisa said. ‘It’s an athlete’s dilemma’ 

‘It only takes one person in the athletes’ village, media village or transport hub to have the virus, and it could spread to everyone,’ she said. 

‘Then those thousands of athletes, support staff, officials and media return home and spread the virus to the world.’ 

The former Ironwoman is a veteran of three Olympic Games – Moscow in 1980, Los Angeles in 1984 and Barcelona in 1992.

Lisa’s comments come as concerns are raised that Tokyo may be in the grips of a fifth wave of coronavirus as infections continue to increase – just weeks before the Olympics are set to start on July 23.  

Star: The former Ironwoman is a veteran of three Olympic Games - Moscow in 1980, Los Angeles in 1984 and Barcelona in 1992.  Pictured in 1990 with her daughter Jaimi Kenny after winning gold in the Womens 100 Metres Butterfly during the 1990 Commonwealth Games

Star: The former Ironwoman is a veteran of three Olympic Games – Moscow in 1980, Los Angeles in 1984 and Barcelona in 1992.  Pictured in 1990 with her daughter Jaimi Kenny after winning gold in the Womens 100 Metres Butterfly during the 1990 Commonwealth Games

Japan is moving ahead with staging the multi-billion-dollar Games, which were delayed by a year due to pandemic, despite public opposition and the warnings from health officials.   

A maximum of 10,000 spectators will be allowed at events during this month’s Tokyo Olympics, but they must wear masks and cannot cheer.

Spectators will not have to provide proof of vaccination or a negative Covid-19 test to enter venues and there will be a lottery of existing ticket-holders to decide who attends.

Super-spreader? 'It only takes one person in the athletes' village, media village or transport hub to have the virus, and it could spread to everyone,' Lisa said. 'Then those thousands of athletes, support staff, officials and media return home and spread the virus to the world'

Super-spreader? ‘It only takes one person in the athletes’ village, media village or transport hub to have the virus, and it could spread to everyone,’ Lisa said. ‘Then those thousands of athletes, support staff, officials and media return home and spread the virus to the world’

Tokyo 2020 chief executive Toshiro Muto said delegates and sponsors would be classed as organisers, and therefore not part of the spectator cap.  

Japanese prime minister Yoshihide Suga warned that having no fans was ‘definitely a possibility’ if the coronavirus situation worsens in Japan. 

Japan’s public remains opposed to holding the Games this summer, a June 19-20 poll from Asahi News Network (ANN) found, with 65 per cent of respondents saying they wanted the event postponed again or cancelled. 

Issues: Japanese prime minister Yoshihide Suga (pictured) warned that having no fans was 'definitely a possibility' if the coronavirus situation worsens in Japan

Issues: Japanese prime minister Yoshihide Suga (pictured) warned that having no fans was ‘definitely a possibility’ if the coronavirus situation worsens in Japan

Read more: In this week's issue of Stellar Magazine

Read more: In this week’s issue of Stellar Magazine 

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