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Loose Women’s Kelle Bryan, 45, reveals she has received the COVID-19 vaccine

Kelle Bryan has received the COVID-19 vaccine due to suffering from an underlying health condition. 

The former Eternal singer, 45, appeared on Loose Women via video-link on Wednesday to discuss her experience with having the jab and her initial concerns about the process.  

The mother-of-two has suffered from lupus, an autoimmune condition, for over 20 years and said she ‘didn’t want to risk getting the virus’ after she previously ‘barely survived’ pneumonia.

Got the jab! Kelle Bryan, 45, appeared on Loose Women via video chat on Wednesday to speak about getting the first of her two coronavirus jabs and the after-effects of the vaccine

Speaking on Loose Women, Kelle said it was the ‘right decision’ for her to have the jab because of her condition, despite concerns in her community that that the vaccine has been rushed. 

She said: ‘In my community there’s a real worry and concern [the vaccine’s] come too quickly, has it had enough time to be developed again, so all those worries and concerns have come through my mind. 

‘But I have come to the conclusion I’ve seen the results are like when I got pneumonia. I didn’t want to risk getting the virus, I weighed it up and thought it was the right decision to make.’

The Hollyoaks actress likened the after-effects of the Covid vaccine to having an annual flu jab saying,: ‘I got a slight headache, but other than that I’ve been absolutely fine. 

Weighed the risks: The singer said it was the 'right decision' for her to have the jab because of her condition, despite concerns in her community that that the vaccine has been rushed out

Weighed the risks: The singer said it was the ‘right decision’ for her to have the jab because of her condition, despite concerns in her community that that the vaccine has been rushed out

‘My arm was slightly tender for a day or so, but no different to having my normal flu jab.’ 

Two days ago, Kelle posted a video of the moment she received the vaccine on her Instagram page, explaining how she was concerned contracting coronavirus could ‘seriously impact’ her health.

She wrote alongside the clip: ‘Ok so that’s part 1 of my #covid_19 #vaccinocovid19 complete. 

‘I know there are many especially in the #blackcommunities that are anti the vaccine and this is not to tell anyone what they should and shouldn’t do. I think its a personal decision that will be taken by all of us. 

‘As a person that barely survived pneumonia due to #lupus I didn’t want to contract a virus that could seriously impact my health and could like other viruses be fatal. 

Going for it:  Kelle posted a video of the moment she received the vaccine on her Instagram, explaining how she was concerned contracting coronavirus could 'seriously impact' her health

Going for it:  Kelle posted a video of the moment she received the vaccine on her Instagram, explaining how she was concerned contracting coronavirus could ‘seriously impact’ her health

‘My experience of the #nhsstaff and volunteers that made it possible was positive. Home to rest . Stay safe and God bless.’ (sic)

This Morning’s Dr Zoe Williams was also on the lunchtime talk show to answer questions about whether the vaccine could trigger any side effects and said that in order for a vaccine ‘to be deemed to be safe’, it ‘has to be extremely safe’. 

‘What we’ve seen – and now millions of people have been vaccinated with this vaccine – is that we’re not seeing any long-term effects. People after those first couple of days all feel fine.’ 

She explained that there has been a ‘small number’ of instances where patients have had ‘allergic reactions’ to the vaccine. 

Medical advice: Dr Zoe Williams was also on the lunchtime talk show to answer questions about whether the vaccine could trigger any side effects

Medical advice: Dr Zoe Williams was also on the lunchtime talk show to answer questions about whether the vaccine could trigger any side effects

Last year, Kelle spoke out on Loose Women about her twenty-year battle with lupus, after contracting the autoimmune condition over 20 years ago.

The singer was first diagnosed with lupus after her girlband Eternal performed at Party in the Park in 1999. 

The diagnosis coincided with her departure from pop group Eternal and her parents’ divorce. Lupus is often bought on by stress. 

The singer and actress said she was proud of the way she has learned not to let lupus control her life but she came close to death in 2016 after she contracted a virus causing her organs to shut down.  

Suffering: Kelle contracted the autoimmune condition over 20 years ago and came close to death in 2016 after she contracted a virus causing her organs to shut down

Suffering: Kelle contracted the autoimmune condition over 20 years ago and came close to death in 2016 after she contracted a virus causing her organs to shut down

She recalled: ‘I was coughing up blood from a cold to pneumonia, because my child had this infection.’

Worryingly Kelle’s organs and kidneys began to shut down, so doctors were forced to administrate adrenaline to kick-start her body.

The lupus then spread to her brain, causing her to suffer a seizure and harrowingly lose three days of her life.

Kelle has since recovered from the infection but said it’s been a tough road physically and mentally.

WHAT IS LUPUS?

What is lupus?

It is one of the chronic autoimmune conditions, where the body makes antibodies against itself and starts to attack it. Lupus – Systemic Lupus Erythematotsus (SLE) – has a range of severity. Some sufferers will have only mild problems, others have life-threatening organ damage to the heart and the kidneys.

What are the symptoms?

Tiredness, joint pains and muscle aches. A common first symptom is joint stiffness, particularly in the mornings. Skin and hair problems are a major feature of SLE – a rash in the shape of a butterfly over the cheeks and nose is common, as is hair loss and sensitivity to the sun. Other problems include depression and lung and heart disease, as well as kidney inflammation.

What can it be mistaken for?

It is often mistaken for other joint problems such as rheumatoid arthritis which is also characterised by morning joint stiffness. It can also be misdiagnosed as a skin or blood disease.

How is it diagnosed?

If your GP suspects SLE they will request a blood test. The specific antibodies that attack the body can be measured in the blood. The diagnosis is made when there is the combination of typical symptoms and high antibodies.

Who is at risk?

SLE is ten times more common in women than men and usually develops between the ages 12 and 25.

What is the treatment?

Controlling the symptoms, as there is no cure, using anti-inflammatories and steroid tablets in more severe cases. 


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