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Michelle Bridges says there’s ‘no way’ The Biggest Loser could be made today

Michelle Bridges says there’s ‘no way’ The Biggest Loser could be made in today’s body-positive society

The Biggest Loser Australia was permanently axed in 2017 after over a decade on-air. 

And the show’s head trainer Michelle Bridges, 50, has now reflected on The Biggest Loser’s downfall from a top-rating program to a ratings-starved flop – and why the show could never be made in today’s body-positive society. 

‘In 10 years everything changes, the vernacular changes, the environment changes, our headspace changes, I mean, technology changes so much in 10 years,’ she told The Good Chat podcast with Anita Anabel this week.  

‘In 10 years everything changes’: Michelle Bridges, 50, has now reflected upon The Biggest Loser’s downfall from a top-rating program to a ratings-starved flop – and why the show could never be made in today’s body-positive society 

Michelle, who starred on The Biggest Loser from its inception in 2007, admitted she began realising the show was losing touch with its audience in the years before it was axed. 

‘I was very clear that we needed to change. And in the end, I decided that I was done and they were going to do one more go, and they did, and it didn’t work,’ she said, referring to The Biggest Loser’s ratings-starved final season.  

‘If we were to do something like that today, it would have to be different. There’s no question. I mean, [the show started in] 2007. A lot has changed in the world in those years,’ she conceded. 

Michelle, who starred on The Biggest Loser from its inception in 2007, admitted she began realising the show was losing touch with its audience in the years before it was axed. Pictured L-R  The Biggest Loser trainers Steve 'Commando' Willis, Tiffiny Hall, Michelle Bridges, Shannan Ponton

Michelle, who starred on The Biggest Loser from its inception in 2007, admitted she began realising the show was losing touch with its audience in the years before it was axed. Pictured L-R  The Biggest Loser trainers Steve ‘Commando’ Willis, Tiffiny Hall, Michelle Bridges, Shannan Ponton

Losing touch: 'I was very clear that we needed to change. And in the end, I decided that I was done and they were going to do one more go, and they did, and it didn't work,' she said, referring to The Biggest Loser's ratings-starved final season

Losing touch: ‘I was very clear that we needed to change. And in the end, I decided that I was done and they were going to do one more go, and they did, and it didn’t work,’ she said, referring to The Biggest Loser’s ratings-starved final season 

While a show focussed upon competitive weight-loss may no longer be in vogue, Michelle still believes there’s a space on television for programs about personal transformations.

‘People still enjoy watching others transform themselves. I mean, it’s quite extraordinary to watch someone completely transform their life and the way in which they think,’ she insisted. 

‘Not just about their weight, but the way in which they view the world and the way in which they view themselves. And I feel that that’s still very appealing.’   

'People still enjoy watching others transform themselves': While a show focussed upon competitive weight-loss may no longer be in vogue, Michelle still believes there's a space on television for programs about personal transformations

‘People still enjoy watching others transform themselves’: While a show focussed upon competitive weight-loss may no longer be in vogue, Michelle still believes there’s a space on television for programs about personal transformations 

Based on the American franchise of the same name, The Biggest Loser Australia followed a group of overweight contestants competing for a cash prize by shedding the highest percentage of body weight.    

During its 11-year stint on-air, the program attracted its fair share of criticism from viewers, contestants and even former host Ajay Rochester.

Many claimed that the program promoted ‘fat shaming’, while others argued that losing a high percentage of weight in such a short time was unhealthy and unrealistic. 

How low can they go? Based on the American franchise of the same name, The Biggest Loser Australia followed a group of overweight contestants competing for a cash prize by shedding the highest percentage of body weight

How low can they go? Based on the American franchise of the same name, The Biggest Loser Australia followed a group of overweight contestants competing for a cash prize by shedding the highest percentage of body weight 

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