Entertainment

Monique Morley attends an event in Sydney after experiencing an alleged Pfizer side effect 

The Bachelor‘s Monique Morley is well and truly on the mend after revealing she was hospitalised and diagnosed with pericarditis, or inflammation of the sac-like tissue that surrounds the heart after getting the Pfizer jab.

The blonde was spotted mingling with other guests at a swanky bar opening in Manly on Thursday. 

She looked the epitome of health in a figure-hugging grey gown that accentuated her curves.

On the mend: Monique Morley turned heads in a risqué gown as she attended a swanky event in Sydney on Wednesday – after claiming she had a ‘heart attack’ from the Pfizer vaccine 

The 29-year-old’s risqué look turned heads as her itsy bitsy frock included a thigh-split, a very busty display and cut-outs on the mid section.

Following the event, Monique took to Instagram to share a picture alongside a friend, declaring she was back in action after the health scare.

‘She’s back… kinda… Celebrating the launch of the new @manlywharfhotel with my honey…. beautiful views of manly wharf with great food + drinks & even better company – what more can a girl want!’ she began. 

‘I would have liked more than one marg because they’re so delicious! But baby steps for me,’ she added.

She's back! Following the event, Monique took to Instagram to share a picture alongside a friend, declaring she was back in action after the health scare. 'She’s back... kinda... Celebrating the launch of the new @manlywharfhotel with my honey,' she wrote

She’s back! Following the event, Monique took to Instagram to share a picture alongside a friend, declaring she was back in action after the health scare. ‘She’s back… kinda… Celebrating the launch of the new @manlywharfhotel with my honey,’ she wrote

Monique first went public with her suspected side effects on October 27 , saying she’d been hospitalised and diagnosed with pericarditis, or inflammation of the sac-like tissue that surrounds the heart. 

Morley, who was a contestant on the Channel Ten dating show in 2019, told Daily Mail Australia that because of her condition she doesn’t have to get another shot until next year, which gives her time to consider other vaccine options as they become available. 

Exemption: In October, Monique (pictured) claimed she suffered a 'heart attack' as a result of her first Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine. She has since said she has obtained a medical exemption meaning she doesn't have to get the second shot

Exemption: In October, Monique (pictured) claimed she suffered a ‘heart attack’ as a result of her first Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine. She has since said she has obtained a medical exemption meaning she doesn’t have to get the second shot

‘I have an exemption until next year, and have to reassess other vaccine options when my pericarditis is better. It’s all the unknown at the moment,’ she said at the time. 

She shared an update on her health in a lengthy Instagram post in late October, after being hospitalised in Sydney several weeks earlier.

‘I’m sharing my story hoping to help others not feel so alone, to bring awareness that this is real. It does happen. It’s not rare anymore,’ the lingerie designer said. 

Morley shared an update on her health in a lengthy Instagram post in October, after being hospitalised in Sydney several weeks earlier

Morley shared an update on her health in a lengthy Instagram post in October, after being hospitalised in Sydney several weeks earlier 

She claims that 15 minutes after getting her vaccine she began to ‘fit uncontrollably’ for 45 minutes, but her doctor said her symptoms weren’t caused by the jab. 

Morley, who says she has no history of seizures, agreed to ‘go home and rest’.

She had another fit the next day, and called an ambulance after experiencing symptoms including lockjaw, clammy hands, heart palpitations and blurred vision. 

Morley accompanied the post (above) with a photo of herself lying in a hospital bed 'shortly after getting her first Pfizer shot'. She contrasted this with another photo, taken a week before she received the vaccine, of herself posing in a swimsuit

Morley accompanied the post (above) with a photo of herself lying in a hospital bed ‘shortly after getting her first Pfizer shot’. She contrasted this with another photo, taken a week before she received the vaccine, of herself posing in a swimsuit

During her ordeal, Morley said the ambulance workers who arrived at her home once again told her the symptoms were unrelated to the Pfizer vaccine, and that she continued to experience chest pain and shortness of breath. 

She then allegedly woke up the next day at 4.30am having ‘a heart attack’.

She was rushed to hospital and diagnosed with pericarditis, an inflammation of the sac-like tissue that surrounds the heart, which holds it in place and helps it function.

Serious claims: The lingerie designer claims that 15 minutes after getting her vaccine she began to 'fit uncontrollably' for 45 minutes, but her doctor said her symptoms weren't caused by the jab

Serious claims: The lingerie designer claims that 15 minutes after getting her vaccine she began to ‘fit uncontrollably’ for 45 minutes, but her doctor said her symptoms weren’t caused by the jab

What is pericarditis?  

Pericarditis is swelling and irritation of the thin, saclike tissue surrounding your heart (pericardium). 

This condition often causes sharp chest pain and sometimes other symptoms. The chest pain occurs when the irritated layers of the pericardium rub against each other.

Pericarditis is usually mild and goes away without treatment. Treatment for more-severe cases may include medications and, rarely, surgery. Early diagnosis and treatment may help reduce the risk of long-term complications from pericarditis.

Source: MayoClinic.org  

After her diagnosis, doctors supposedly told Morley there was nothing she could do except ‘rest and take Panadol’.

‘It’s just so defeating having everyone tell you that it’s not related [to the vaccine] when really it is,’ she added, describing the experience as ‘traumatic’.

Morley, who has reported her symptoms to the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA), said she hopes her story inspires people to have an open mind when it comes to vaccine side effects.

One of her Instagram followers asked if she had any preexisting health conditions that could have caused the pericarditis.

She replied: ‘Absolutely nothing. Don’t smoke. Don’t drink. Don’t take drugs. Don’t even have caffeine.’ 

Morley accompanied the post with a photo of herself lying in a hospital bed ‘shortly after getting her first Pfizer shot’.

She contrasted this with another photo, taken a week before she received the vaccine, of herself posing in a swimsuit. 

In other recent social media posts, she claims she is recovering thanks to naturopathic care and IV vitamin drips.

These aren’t medically recommended treatments for pericarditis.

In the  24 hours since she posted about her suspected side effect, her Instagram account became a flashpoint for anti-vaxxers, who grossly exaggerate the number of adverse reactions to the vaccine.

Pericarditis – inflammation of the outer lining of the heart – and myocarditis – inflammation of the heart muscle – have been observed in an extremely small number of people after receiving mRNA vaccines, of which Pfizer is one. 

The cases were disproportionately teenagers and men under the age of 30 after their second dose of the jab.

British data released in August found the rate of pericarditis was 3.8 cases per one million doses of the Pfizer shot – a rate of one in 263,157.

By July 8, the TGA was notified of 50 cases of pericarditis in Australia as a result of 3.2 million Pfizer doses.

The risk of suffering a heart condition as a result of Covid-19 is much higher.

Morley (pictured on The Bachelor in 2019) said the ambulance workers who arrived at her home once again told her the symptoms were unrelated to the Pfizer vaccine, and that she continued to experience chest pain and shortness of breath

Morley (pictured on The Bachelor in 2019) said the ambulance workers who arrived at her home once again told her the symptoms were unrelated to the Pfizer vaccine, and that she continued to experience chest pain and shortness of breath  

Morley previously spoke about her pericarditis diagnosis on October 8, but did not share specific details about her symptoms until October 27.

In her earlier Instagram post, she made it clear she was ‘not anti-vax or pro-vax’ and insisted she was ‘open-minded’ and ‘pro personal choice, whatever that may be’.

‘I’m pro being kind and considerate, and not trolling and bullying on those who… just don’t agree with you,’ she wrote at the time.

Morley previously spoke about her pericarditis diagnosis on October 8. In her earlier Instagram post (pictured), she made it clear she was 'not anti-vax or pro-vax' and insisted she was 'open-minded' and 'pro personal choice, whatever that may be'

Morley previously spoke about her pericarditis diagnosis on October 8. In her earlier Instagram post (pictured), she made it clear she was ‘not anti-vax or pro-vax’ and insisted she was ‘open-minded’ and ‘pro personal choice, whatever that may be’ 

In a follow-up post, Morley thanked fans for their concern and said the adverse reactions she experienced 'do not happen to the majority'

In a follow-up post, Morley thanked fans for their concern and said the adverse reactions she experienced ‘do not happen to the majority’ 

The former reality star also said she wasn’t looking for sympathy.  

In a follow-up post, Morley thanked fans for their concern and said the adverse reactions she experienced ‘do not happen to the majority’.

She then said she hopes her story doesn’t frighten people into not getting vaccinated, but instead raises awareness so they can make an informed decision for themselves.

Professor Jason Kovacic, the Executive Director of the Victor Change Cardiac Research Institute, told Daily Mail Australia at the time that pericarditis can happen after Covid vaccines but only in ‘very, very rare’ cases. 

No fear: She said she hopes her story doesn't frighten people into not getting vaccinated, but instead raises awareness so they can make an informed decision for themselves

No fear: She said she hopes her story doesn’t frighten people into not getting vaccinated, but instead raises awareness so they can make an informed decision for themselves 

‘Covid-19 vaccines can cause specific heart problems such as myocarditis and pericarditis, and particularly in males less than 30 years of age – but only very, very rarely,’ Professor Kovacic said.

‘About 60 people per one million can get myocarditis with the mRNA vaccines (Pfizer and Moderna) and it is generally a mild, short-lived illness. These complications cause inflammation of the heart muscle or inflammation of the lining around the heart muscle. 

‘These complications have been reported in just a handful of people around the world and to the best of our knowledge most of them have recovered.’

Professor Kovacic said the risks of getting heart conditions as a result of Covid are much higher, and that the vaccine is the best safeguard to preventing these illnesses. 

‘In contrast, the risk of having some form of heart complications if you contract Covid-19 is about 1000 times higher at ~5-10%,’ he said.

Ms Morley (right) rose to fame on The Bachelor in 2019, vying for the heart of astrophysicist Matt Agnew (left). Pictured centre: fellow contestant Abbie Chatfield

Ms Morley (right) rose to fame on The Bachelor in 2019, vying for the heart of astrophysicist Matt Agnew (left). Pictured centre: fellow contestant Abbie Chatfield

‘A very recent observational study has shown that young males infected with the virus are up to six times more likely to develop myocarditis as opposed to those who received the vaccine.

‘Covid-19 vaccines are incredibly safe and incredibly effective at preventing people from getting seriously unwell with Covid-19 infection. 

‘The benefits for being vaccinated far outweigh any risk to the heart, especially given the highly infectious nature of the Delta variant which is now affecting an increasing number of young people.’ 


Source link

Related Articles

Back to top button