Entertainment

Netflix drops a teaser for its college admissions scandal documentary

Netlfix takes a deeper look at the college admissions scandal with a new documentary set for release next month.

The streaming giant dropped a teaser on Monday, two years after the huge nationwide scam was uncovered, with actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin among over 50 people indicted.

Operation Varsity Blues will center on Rick Singer, the mastermind behind the scheme to get the kids of wealthy parents into the colleges of their choice.

Closer look: Netlfix dropped a teaser for Operation Varsity Blues on Monday. It will center on Rick Singer, the mastermind behind the college admissions scandal which blew up in 2019

Singer allegedly set up fake charities through which he would make large donations to colleges such as Yale University, Georgetown, Stanford and the University of Southern California to secure places for the kids of his clients.

Singer allegedly helped facilitate donations amounting to $25 million from parents across the country including Loughlin and Huffman.

The teaser clip opens with a ‘real conversation’ between Singer and one of his clients concerned about the risk that it ‘blows up in my face’ if it’s discovered the ‘polo team is selling seats into the school for $250,000’.

‘Well no, because she’s a water polo player.’ Singer responds, before his client, sounding more skeptical, replies, ‘But she’s not.’

Scam: Actresses Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman were among over 50 people indicted in the case which uncovered a massive scheme with wealthy parents paying bribes to get their kids into elite colleges

Shock scandal:  The case uncovered a massive scheme with wealthy parents paying bribes to get their kids into elite colleges

Actresses Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman were among over 50 people indicted in the case which uncovered a massive scheme with wealthy parents paying bribes to get their kids into elite colleges

What was said: The teaser clip opens with a 'real conversation' between Singer and one of his clients concerned about the risk that it 'blows up in my face' if it's discovered the 'polo team is selling seats into the school for $250,000'.

What was said: The teaser clip opens with a ‘real conversation’ between Singer and one of his clients concerned about the risk that it ‘blows up in my face’ if it’s discovered the ‘polo team is selling seats into the school for $250,000’.

Deeper look: Netflix said in its announcement that the documentary will use 'an innovative combination of interviews and narrative recreations of the FBI's wiretapped conversations between Singer and his clients.'

Deeper look: Netflix said in its announcement that the documentary will use ‘an innovative combination of interviews and narrative recreations of the FBI’s wiretapped conversations between Singer and his clients.’

Netflix said in its announcement that the documentary will use ‘an innovative combination of interviews and narrative recreations of the FBI’s wiretapped conversations between Singer and his clients.’ 

Actor Matthew Modine plays Singer, the admitted mastermind of the operation who flipped and started working with investigators, secretly recording his conversations with parents and coaches.

Directed by Chris Smith, the same man behind Fyre: The Greatest Party That Never Happened and also an executive producer of Tiger King, the documentary starts streaming on March 17.

Actor Matthew Modine plays Singer (pictured March 2019), the admitted mastermind of the operation who flipped and started working with investigators, secretly recording his conversations with parents and coaches

Actor Matthew Modine plays Singer (pictured March 2019), the admitted mastermind of the operation who flipped and started working with investigators, secretly recording his conversations with parents and coaches

More than 50 people were charged in the scandal that saw parents pay bribes to have someone cheat on their children’s entrance exams or pretend their kids were star athletes for sports they didn’t play.

Singer pleaded guilty to racketeering conspiracy and several other charges, and is expected to testify at defendants’ trials. He has not been sentenced.

Loughlin was released from federal lockup at CI Dublin in California on December 28, where she served the entirety of her two month prison sentence, as stated by the Federal Bureau of Prisons.

Prison time: Loughlin was released from federal lockup at CI Dublin in California on December 28, where she served the entirety of her two month prison sentence, as stated by the Federal Bureau of Prisons

Prison time: Loughlin was released from federal lockup at CI Dublin in California on December 28, where she served the entirety of her two month prison sentence, as stated by the Federal Bureau of Prisons

Behind bars: Her husband, fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli, is still serving his five-month sentence at a prison in Lompoc near Santa Barbara, California for his role in the college admissions bribery scheme

Behind bars: Her husband, fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli, is still serving his five-month sentence at a prison in Lompoc near Santa Barbara, California for his role in the college admissions bribery scheme

The Full House star reportedly had a ‘tearful’ reunion with her daughters Olivia Jade, 21, and Bella Rose, 22, when she finally returned to their Malibu mansion.

Her husband, fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli, is still serving his five-month sentence at a prison in Lompoc near Santa Barbara, California for his role in the college admissions bribery scheme.

He is scheduled to be released on April 17. Prosecutors said Giannulli deserved a tougher sentence because he was ‘the more active participant in the scheme.’

Loughlin and Giannulli admitted in May to paying $500,000 to get their two daughters, Olivia and Isabella, into the University of Southern California as crew recruits even though neither girl was a rower

Privilege: Loughlin and Giannulli admitted in May to paying $500,000 to get their two daughters, Olivia and Isabella, into the University of Southern California as crew recruits even though neither girl was a rower

Privilege: Loughlin and Giannulli admitted in May to paying $500,000 to get their two daughters, Olivia and Isabella, into the University of Southern California as crew recruits even though neither girl was a rower

Involved: Huffman served nearly two weeks in prison last year for paying an admissions consultant $15,000 to have a proctor correct her daughter's SAT answers

Involved: Huffman served nearly two weeks in prison last year for paying an admissions consultant $15,000 to have a proctor correct her daughter’s SAT answers

Their guilty plea was a stunning reversal for the couple, whose lawyers had insisted for a year they were innocent – even and accusing investigators of fabricating evidence against them. 

Huffman, who admitted her guilt from the start, served nearly two weeks in prison last year for paying an admissions consultant $15,000 to have a proctor correct her daughter’s SAT answers. 

Of the nearly 60 parents, coaches and others charged in the case, about a dozen are still fighting the allegations. The sentences for the parents who have pleaded so far in the case range from a couple weeks to nine months. 


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