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Noni Hazlehurst’s ‘first paid job since March’ in compelling murder mystery series Winding Road

TV veteran Noni Hazlehurst reveals her ‘first paid job since March’ has her lending her voice to play a role in a compelling murder mystery series

She recently accused Australian networks of ‘taking advantage’ of the coronavirus pandemic to cut quotas on homegrown content.

But two months on from labelling the entertainment industry’s actions as ‘very, very disturbing’, Noni Hazlehurst has detailed her ‘first paid job offer since March.’ 

The TV veteran has been lending her voice to the fictional podcast Winding Road, which is a murder mystery series following the disappearance of musician William Hamilton.

Current project: Two months on from accusing Australian networks for ‘taking advantage’ of the coronavirus pandemic to cut quotas on homegrown content, Noni Hazlehurst (pictured) has detailed her ‘first paid job offer since March’

‘I just want to tell good stories,’ the 67-year-old, who is playing William’s half-sister Rachel in the podcast, told 9Honey Celebrity on Tuesday.

Celebrities starring alongside Noni in Winding Road include Dacre Montgomery, Yael Stone, David Berry and Anna McGahan, and singer-songwriter Bernard Fanning.

Noni also told the publication she wouldn’t be where she is today without her start in Play School as a presenter. She worked on the show from 1978 to 2001.

On screen: Noni (pictured) is best known for presenting children's program Play School from 1978 to 2001

On screen: Noni (pictured) is best known for presenting children’s program Play School from 1978 to 2001

‘I’m very, very, very proud of because it really taught me how to communicate,’ she said.

‘If you can keep the interest of a three or four-year-old child for half an hour and get them to interact with the screen, adults are a breeze after that.’ 

Noni, who is a fierce advocate for those working in the arts and entertainment industries, is also known for her roles on TV dramas including The Sullivans, City Homicide and A Place to Call Home.

'If you can keep the interest of a three or four-year-old child for half an hour and get them to interact with the screen, adults are a breeze after that,' Noni said about working on Play School

‘If you can keep the interest of a three or four-year-old child for half an hour and get them to interact with the screen, adults are a breeze after that,’ Noni said about working on Play School

In September, she told TV Tonight the industry bigwigs were throughout the coronavirus pandemic ‘just taking advantage of the fact they can say, “Now we’ve got the perfect excuse to cut all these quotas”.’

‘It’s very, very disturbing,’ Noni said. ‘They’ve been trying to do that for years.  

‘The reality is they put so much money into sport, which certainly came back to bite them on the bum, and stretching the boundaries of what constitutes Australian content.’

In character: In September, Noni (pictured on A Place to Call Home) told TV Tonight: 'The reality is they put so much money into sport, which certainly came back to bite them on the bum, and stretching the boundaries of what constitutes Australian content'

In character: In September, Noni (pictured on A Place to Call Home) told TV Tonight: ‘The reality is they put so much money into sport, which certainly came back to bite them on the bum, and stretching the boundaries of what constitutes Australian content’

Commercial free-to-air television licensees must broadcast an annual minimum of 55 per cent Australian programming between 6am and midnight.

Noni acknowledged the networks were not entirely to blame for the dearth of local content, saying they were experiencing tough financial times.

However, she blamed the government for its lack of support for the creative industries during the coronavirus recession at the time.

The end of Aussie drama? Noni said she was doubtful the next great Australian production would receive any funding by the major networks, even after the economic recovery

The end of Aussie drama? Noni said she was doubtful the next great Australian production would receive any funding by the major networks, even after the economic recovery 

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