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Olivia Attwood has mole on her back removed and urges her fans to be vigilant over their skin

Olivia Attwood revealed that she had a mole on her back removed on Thursday as she urged her fans to be vigilant over changes to their skin.

The former Love Island star, 29, said that her doctor examined the mole and noted that it ‘looks fine’ but he decided to go ahead with the removal ‘just in case’.

Taking to her Instagram Stories on Thursday, Olivia told her 1.9 million followers to be vigilant over changes to their skin and to always check their moles.

Careful: Olivia Attwood revealed that she had a mole on her back removed on Thursday as she urged her fans to be vigilant over changes to their skin

The reality star started her video by showing a small plaster on her back, she said: ‘My tiny little war wound there. I had to get a mole removed this morning. 

‘He [her doctor] thinks it’s fine but he just said let’s get it off, just in case, but he’s not too concerned.’

Olivia added that she always does mole mapping, which tracks your skin and any changes, once a year before summer and has done it since a teenager.  

Candid: The former Love Island star, 29, said that her doctor examined the mole and noted that it 'looks fine' but he decided to go ahead with the removal 'just in case'

Candid: The former Love Island star, 29, said that her doctor examined the mole and noted that it ‘looks fine’ but he decided to go ahead with the removal ‘just in case’

Important: Taking to her Instagram Stories on Thursday, Olivia told her 1.9 million followers to be vigilant over changes to their skin and to always check their moles

Important: Taking to her Instagram Stories on Thursday, Olivia told her 1.9 million followers to be vigilant over changes to their skin and to always check their moles

Mole mapping can help to detect melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, early on and can also ensure markings aren’t life-threatening.   

Olivia said: ‘It reminds me, guys, always get your moles checked. I do it once every year, especially before summer, they call it mole mapping.

The alphabet mole guide

A – Asymmetry: Look out for details that your mole is uneven in shape.

B – Border: Notice whether the edges of your mole are irregular, jagged or blurred.

C – Colour: Is the colour of your mole even, patchy or different shades? Does it contain hints of pink, red or brown?

D – Diameter: Is your mole less than six millimetres and is it raised?

E – Evolution: Has your mole changed in size, shape, thickness or colour?

‘I check all my freckles, moles, check if there’s any changes in my skin and it’s a really good thing to do once a year. It’s really important and that’s that.’

Olivia revealed later in the day that her DMs had gone ‘mental’ over her chat about mole removal and checking skin.

Answering some of her 1.9million fans’ questions, she revealed that the mole removal didn’t hurt and was a speedy process.

She said: ‘It didn’t hurt at all, couple of stitches, was in there about half an hour.’ 

Olivia, who has always had a dermatologist, also revealed that she went privately and paid for the procedure herself.

In November, fellow Love Island star Molly-Mae Hague revealed that she had a cancerous mole removed as she too encouraged her followers to get any unusual marks checked as ‘you just never know.’ 

Olivia has always candidly spoke about her health and procedures on social media.

Late last year, the reality star had surgery to remove a non-cancerous lump on her right breast which she documented on her TV show, Olivia Meets Her Match. 

Talking on her way to the appointment, Olivia said: ‘It’s been a rough couple of weeks where I’ve been for surgery again. I found a lump at the top of my right breast, it was quite hard and I could really feel it on the top of the surface.’

Safe: The reality star started her video by showing a small plaster on her back, she said: 'My tiny little war wound there. I had to get a mole removed this morning. He [her doctor] thinks it's fine but he just said let's get it off, just in case, but he's not too concerned.'

Safe: The reality star started her video by showing a small plaster on her back, she said: ‘My tiny little war wound there. I had to get a mole removed this morning. He [her doctor] thinks it’s fine but he just said let’s get it off, just in case, but he’s not too concerned.’

Important: Olivia added that she always does mole mapping, which tracks your skin and any changes, once a year before summer and has done it since a teenager

Important: Mole mapping can help to detect melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, early on and can also ensure markings aren't life-threatening

Important: Olivia added that she always does mole mapping, which tracks your skin and any changes, once a year before summer and has done it since a teenager

Advice: Olivia revealed later in the day that her DMs had gone 'mental' over her chat about mole removal and checking skin as she answered fans' questions

Advice: Olivia revealed later in the day that her DMs had gone ‘mental’ over her chat about mole removal and checking skin as she answered fans’ questions 

She added: ‘It’s causing me quite a lot of pain and discomfort.’ 

It then showed Olivia meeting her surgeon as she explained to viewers: ‘Chances are it’s going to be nothing but it still sits in the pit of your stomach.’

The reality star then underwent an ultrasound scan on the lump, to which her surgeon said: ‘I’m confident that this isn’t breast cancer.’

Regardless of the outcome, Olivia decided to have surgery to remove the non-cancerous lump as she encouraged her viewers to be in tune with their bodies.

She said: ‘It’s just made me really sure now that I want it out. I don’t want whatever that is in there that keeps growing at this rapid rate. I want it gone.’

Raising awareness: In November, fellow Love Island star Molly-Mae Hague (pictured) revealed that she had a cancerous mole removed as she too encouraged her followers to get any unusual marks checked as 'you just never know'

Raising awareness: In November, fellow Love Island star Molly-Mae Hague (pictured) revealed that she had a cancerous mole removed as she too encouraged her followers to get any unusual marks checked as ‘you just never know’ 

Olivia added: ‘I’ve got an audience of girls from 13-25. If I could encourage them to be more in tune with their bodies and female health, then that is a good thing.’

Millions of women have lumps in their breasts checked out for cancer every year. Nine out of ten turn out to be benign but such lumps can be recurring and worrying.

Possible non-cancerous causes can include fibroadenomas, cysts and lipoma. Always visit a doctor if you are worried about a lump. 

Olivia’s eight-episode series followed the reality star and her Blackburn Rovers footballer fiancé Bradley Dack, as they plan their wedding and buy their first home in Cheshire. It has recently been renewed for series two. 

Love story: Olivia's reality series followed the reality star and her Blackburn Rovers footballer fiancé Bradley Dack, as they plan their wedding and buy their first home in Cheshire. It has recently been renewed for series two.

Love story: Olivia’s reality series followed the reality star and her Blackburn Rovers footballer fiancé Bradley Dack, as they plan their wedding and buy their first home in Cheshire. It has recently been renewed for series two. 

MELANOMA IS THE MOST DANGEROUS FORM OF SKIN CANCER

Melanoma is the most dangerous form of skin cancer. It happens after the DNA in skin cells is damaged (typically due to harmful UV rays) and then not repaired so it triggers mutations that can form malignant tumors. 

Around 15,900 new cases occur every year in the UK, with 2,285 Britons dying from the disease in 2016, according to Cancer Research UK statistics. 

Causes

  • Sun exposure: UV and UVB rays from the sun and tanning beds are harmful to the skin
  • Moles: The more moles you have, the greater the risk for getting melanoma 
  • Skin type: Fairer skin has a higher risk for getting melanoma
  • Hair color: Red heads are more at risk than others
  • Personal history: If you’ve had melanoma once, then you are more likely to get it again
  • Family history: If previous relatives have been diagnosed, then that increases your risk

Treatment 

This can be done by removing the entire section of the tumor or by the surgeon removing the skin layer by layer. When a surgeon removes it layer by layer, this helps them figure out exactly where the cancer stops so they don’t have to remove more skin than is necessary. 

The patient can decide to use a skin graft if the surgery has left behind discoloration or an indent. 

  • Immunotherapy, radiation treatment or chemotherapy: 

This is needed if the cancer reaches stage III or IV. That means that the cancerous cells have spread to the lymph nodes or other organs in the body. 

Prevention

  • Use sunscreen and do not burn
  • Avoid tanning outside and in beds 
  • Apply sunscreen 30 minutes before going outside
  • Keep newborns out of the sun
  • Examine your skin every month
  • See your physician every year for a skin exam 

 Source: Skin Cancer Foundation and American Cancer Society


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