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Pregnant Paloma Faith reveals she was hospitalised after fearing she’d gone into labour

Paloma Faith has revealed she was hospitalised once again with ‘cramping’ after fearing she’d gone into labour with her second child.

The singer, 39, said she was told by doctors that she had a ‘super thin’ womb lining due to ‘scarring’ from the birth of her first child four years ago, but ruled out the possibility of pre-term labour.

Paloma said she’s ‘focused’ on carrying her baby to full-term and protecting herself from COVID-19 after announcing she was pregnant following six rounds of IVD.

Close call: Paloma Faith, 39, has revealed she was hospitalised once again with ‘cramping’ after fearing she’d gone into labour with her second child

Paloma shared a snap of her growing bump covered in a 70s-inspired brown printed shirt and a paisley frilled skirt as she told fans about her hospital dash.

She wrote: ‘Had a little trip to the MFAU this week with some cramping but they ruled out preterm labour (phew) and rigged me up to the machine for a bit. 

‘In the scan, it shows that the womb lining is super thin around the scarring from the last birth and that means it’s pretty weak. 

‘Maybe the baby being so big (everyone says wow super long legs when they scan me) is putting pressure on it and making it a bit crampy, who knows. 

No baby yet: The singer said she was told by doctors that she had a 'super thin' womb lining due to 'scarring' from the birth of her first child four years ago

No baby yet: The singer said she was told by doctors that she had a ‘super thin’ womb lining due to ‘scarring’ from the birth of her first child four years ago

‘But what I do know is the hospitals are doing an incredible job in all this at keeping the maternity-related wards so clean and so calm given that the other day we had the highest death toll of covid related deaths so far. 

‘It’s really incredible, and when I also find out that the tories have just signed away the protection of the NHS in future trade deals internationally. Devastating! 

‘I’m just focusing on keeping my baby in for full-term and not catching COVID, and how amazing the staff of the hospitals are for now. 

‘Anyone else having a baby in this mess, I stand with you all, we can do this and live to tell the tale! Hugs for everyone xxx.’

It comes after it was revealed that Paloma is set to star in a new BBC documentary about balancing the demands of her music, launching an acting career and being a first time mum. 

Small screen: It comes after it was revealed that Paloma is set to star in a BBC documentary about balancing the demands of music, launching an acting career and being a first time mum

Small screen: It comes after it was revealed that Paloma is set to star in a BBC documentary about balancing the demands of music, launching an acting career and being a first time mum

She will star in Paloma Faith: As I Am for BBC2 and iPlayer following her IVF struggles.

The documentary will also explore the hitmaker’s difficulties in getting pregnant for a second time after six rounds of IVF, as it takes a deep dive into the star’s life behind the scenes.

Paloma, who has a four-year-old daughter with boyfriend Leyman Lahcine, worked with director Jane Mingay over the course of a year on the film. 

She said: ‘I was very reluctant to let a camera into the very personal experience of working as a first time mum but Jane Mingay who made the film is also a mother and a friend so I felt safe. 

‘The result is very telling, exposed and at times emotional for me to watch. Also, I hope it’s a testament to all working mothers out there. As a feminist, I don’t believe in aiming for patriarchal ideals in order to be a success. 

‘I believe in embracing our feminine strengths and abilities in order to try and navigate success in a male dominated and judged world. The film I hope gives some insight into this.’

TV: She will star in Paloma Faith: As I Am for BBC2 and iPlayer as she prepares to welcome her second child

TV: She will star in Paloma Faith: As I Am for BBC2 and iPlayer as she prepares to welcome her second child

Jane told how there is a moment in the film where Paloma doesn’t know where she’s going to be able to get pregnant after two rounds of IVF.

She said: ‘Obviously a lot of women go through this and it’s really difficult. She does talk about it a lot and it will help many women to see it. It’s a journey that people don’t talk about.’ 

Jan Younghusband, Head of Commissioning, BBC Music Television says: ‘Paloma Faith – As I Am, from first time director Jane Mingay, shines a light on Paloma’s incredible achievements in her career to date, whilst also taking an honest look at the reality of balancing the commitments of parenthood with a demanding career. 

‘It’s a warm and often moving film and I’m delighted that we’ll be able to bring Paloma’s inspiring story to viewers on BBC Two.’ 

Elsewhere in the documentary, Paloma will also reportedly discuss her father Ramon, who she has not spoken to in over 10 years.  

Couple: Paloma, who has a four-year-old daughter with boyfriend Leyman Lahcine, worked with director Jane Mingay over the course of a year on the film (pictured in 2018)

Couple: Paloma, who has a four-year-old daughter with boyfriend Leyman Lahcine, worked with director Jane Mingay over the course of a year on the film (pictured in 2018)

The film observes Paloma’s life, both front and backstage, in the midst of a pivotal year in her career. 

It features appearances and contributions from Rag’n’Bone Man, Ty Taylor and Jonas Blue as well as her band, management and family members. We see her struggling with choices every mum will be familiar with, whilst embarking on enormous career challenges in a cut-throat business.

Paloma not only returns to work after having her baby, but also to huge expectations to break Australia and America.

MailOnline has contacted a representative for Paloma Faith for comment. 

Birth: The singer welcomed her first child with Leyman, 33, in 2016 and told fans at the time that she had endured a 'difficult' birth (pictured)

Birth: The singer welcomed her first child with Leyman, 33, in 2016 and told fans at the time that she had endured a ‘difficult’ birth (pictured) 

It comes after Paloma revealed revealed she spent Monday night in the Maternal Fetal Assessment Unit (MFAU) after suffering with lower abdominal cramps.

Paloma also admitted that she had been ‘praying’ her baby doesn’t come early after she endured a ‘difficult’ birth and emergency caesarean with her four-year-old daughter.

She captioned the snap with: ‘We were in the MFAU last night cause I’ve had some lower abdominal cramps… b****y praying this one doesn’t come early like the last!’

Paloma also shared a photo of the ‘water retention’ in her feet, she penned: ‘Look at this water retention!!! I just pressed my ankle and this remained imprinted for a good 3 mins.’ 

The singer welcomed her first child with partner Leyman in 2016 and told fans at the time that she had endured a ‘difficult’ birth.

She wrote: ‘After a difficult birth resulting in an emergency caesarean I gave birth to my first child with whom I am over the moon, in love and delighted. What a trip!’

‘It was with all the help of some incredible doctors, midwives and nurses at UCH NHS Hospital.

‘The devotion, kindness and commitment shown by all of them was second to none and I am humbled by the whole experience.

‘I really believe the NHS to be one of the greatest achievements of this country and it should be respected and protected by all.

‘So thank you to the NHS, Melissa Whitten, Georgia Seiti, Wendy Hill, all in the Fetal Assessment Unit and the Maternity Care Units. And God bless the NHS.’

Documentary: The project came about when Jane begged Paloma to tell her story on camera, believing it would inspire other women (pictured with partner Leyman Lahcine in 2015)

Documentary: The project came about when Jane begged Paloma to tell her story on camera, believing it would inspire other women (pictured with partner Leyman Lahcine in 2015) 

HOW DOES IVF WORK?

In-vitro fertilisation, known as IVF, is a medical procedure in which a woman has an already-fertilised egg inserted into her womb to become pregnant.

It is used when couples are unable to conceive naturally, and a sperm and egg are removed from their bodies and combined in a laboratory before the embryo is inserted into the woman.

Once the embryo is in the womb, the pregnancy should continue as normal.

The procedure can be done using eggs and sperm from a couple or those from donors. 

Guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommends that IVF should be offered on the NHS to women under 43 who have been trying to conceive through regular unprotected sex for two years.

People can also pay for IVF privately, which costs an average of £3,348 for a single cycle, according to figures published in January 2018, and there is no guarantee of success.

The NHS says success rates for women under 35 are about 29 per cent, with the chance of a successful cycle reducing as they age.

Around eight million babies are thought to have been born due to IVF since the first ever case, British woman Louise Brown, was born in 1978.

Chances of success

The success rate of IVF depends on the age of the woman undergoing treatment, as well as the cause of the infertility (if it’s known).

Younger women are more likely to have a successful pregnancy. 

IVF isn’t usually recommended for women over the age of 42 because the chances of a successful pregnancy are thought to be too low.

Between 2014 and 2016 the percentage of IVF treatments that resulted in a live birth was:

29 per cent for women under 35

23 per cent for women aged 35 to 37

15 per cent for women aged 38 to 39

9 per cent for women aged 40 to 42

3 per cent for women aged 43 to 44

2 per cent for women aged over 44


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