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Robert Irwin, 16, is rushes to the aid of a melon-headed whale left stranded on Noosa Shore

He’s the youngest offspring of the late animal conservationist, Steve Irwin.

And Robert Irwin, 16, would certainly have made his father proud this week- as he was amongst a team of quick responders who rushed to the aid of a melon-headed whale stranded on Noosa North Shore.

Bindi’s brother said he was ‘so thankful’ to the public for raising the alarm about the stranded mammal on Friday, with Robert travelling to help alongside an emergency response team from Australia Zoo and Wildlife Warriors as fast as possible.

Making dad proud: Robert Irwin, 16, would certainly have made his father Steve proud on Friday, as he was amongst a team of quick responders who rushed to the aid of a melon-headed whale stranded on Noosa North Shore

‘We knew we had to respond straight away – strandings are incredibly stressful for whales and dolphins,’ Robert said.

The team travelled an hour north to the whale’s location, where they were met by Queensland Parks and Wildlife Rangers.

Tragically, when the team reached the animal – less often known as the ‘little killer whale’ – it was already severely ill, with a condition commonly suffered by melon-headed whales called cetacean morbillivirus.

Rescue mission: Robert was said he was 'so thankful' to the member of the public who found the stranded mammal on Friday, with Robert attending with an Emergency Response Team from Australia Zoo and Wildlife Warriors as fast as possible

Rescue mission: Robert was said he was ‘so thankful’ to the member of the public who found the stranded mammal on Friday, with Robert attending with an Emergency Response Team from Australia Zoo and Wildlife Warriors as fast as possible

Not well: Tragically, when the team reached the animal it was already severely ill, with a condition commonly suffered by melon-headed whales called cetacean morbillivirus

Not well: Tragically, when the team reached the animal it was already severely ill, with a condition commonly suffered by melon-headed whales called cetacean morbillivirus

Distance: The team travelled an hour north to the whale's location, where they were met by Queensland Parks and Wildlife Rangers

Distance: The team travelled an hour north to the whale’s location, where they were met by Queensland Parks and Wildlife Rangers

Not good: 'It was underweight, chronically sick and had minor shark bites due to its weak state,' Dr Rosie Booth, Chief-of-Staff at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital, said

Not good: ‘It was underweight, chronically sick and had minor shark bites due to its weak state,’ Dr Rosie Booth, Chief-of-Staff at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital, said

‘It was underweight, chronically sick and had minor shark bites due to its weak state,’ Dr Rosie Booth, Chief-of-Staff at the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital, said.

While Robert and the team did their best to make the animal comfortable, sadly, there was no other option that to humanely euthanise the whale.

‘It’s incredibly sad to lose such a beautiful animal, but we’re glad she didn’t have to suffer alone on the beach,’ Robert added.

‘We’re so thankful to the public and Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service for their help.

Tragedy: While Robert and the team did their best to make the animal comfortable, sadly, there was no other option that to humanely euthanise the whale

Tragedy: While Robert and the team did their best to make the animal comfortable, sadly, there was no other option that to humanely euthanise the whale

Tragedy: While Robert and the team did their best to make the animal comfortable, sadly, there was no other option that to humanely euthanise the whale

Always here to help: 'It’s incredibly sad to lose such a beautiful animal, but we’re glad she didn’t have to suffer alone on the beach,' Robert added.

Always here to help: The rescue team operates seven days a week, in transporting sick, injured and orphaned wildlife to the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital

Incredible: Recently, the animal hospital treated its 100,000th patient

Incredible: Recently, the animal hospital treated its 100,000th patient

Runs in the family: Just like his father, Robert has been committed to wildlife conservation throughout his life

Runs in the family: Just like his father, Robert has been committed to wildlife conservation throughout his life

‘A whale stranding is incredibly emotional, and their support was great.’

The rescue team operates seven days a week, in transporting sick, injured and orphaned wildlife to the Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital.

Recently, the hospital treated its 100,000th patient.

Just like his father, Robert has been committed to wildlife conservation throughout his life – as has his mum Terri and sister Bindi, who is expecting her first child with husband Chandler Powell in 2021.

Tragic loss: Steve (pictured) died in September 2006 at the age of 44, after being pierced in the chest by a stingray barb while filming a wildlife documentary in Batt Reef, Queensland

Tragic loss: Steve (pictured) died in September 2006 at the age of 44, after being pierced in the chest by a stingray barb while filming a wildlife documentary in Batt Reef, Queensland


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