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Selma Blair reveals she’s currently in remission from her multiple sclerosis battle

Selma Blair says she’s currently in remission amid ongoing multiple sclerosis battle after stem cell transplant: ‘My prognosis is great’

  • Blair, 49, revealed the news on Monday while promoting new documentary that follows her battle with MS 
  • The Cruel Intentions star first went public with her health issues in October 2018 
  • Last week, she supported her friend Christina Applegate, 49, who is also suffering from the autoimmune disease
  • ‘My prognosis is great. I’m in remission. Stem cell put me in remission,’ Blair said at the TCAs 

Selma Blair has revealed that she is currently in remission in her ongoing battle with multiple sclerosis. 

The 49-year-old – who went public with her autoimmune disease diagnosis in October 2018 – gave the health update when appearing virtually at the discovery+ TCA panel on Monday.

‘My prognosis is great. I’m in remission. Stem cell put me in remission,’ Blair said, according to People. ‘It took about a year after stem cell for the inflammation and lesions to really go down.’

According to HealthLine, MS sufferers who undergo treatment will go through periods of relapses and remissions. 

Health update: Selma Blair has revealed she is now in remission from her MS battle 

The remission period can last for weeks, months, or in some cases, years, but it doesn’t mean the patient no longer has MS. 

Blair was promoting her upcoming documentary ‘Introducing Selma Blair’, directed by Rachel Fleit, that follows her health issues and battle with MS. 

The actress has been dealing with debilitating symptoms from the disease, including difficulty in speaking, and losing the ability to use her left leg fully, resulting in her using a cane to walk. 

Tough: The actress has been dealing with debilitating symptoms from the disease, including difficulty in speaking, and losing the ability to use her left leg fully

Tough: The actress has been dealing with debilitating symptoms from the disease, including difficulty in speaking, and losing the ability to use her left leg fully

Blair – who is a mother to her 10-year-old son Arthur – decided to try a stem cell transplant, in addition to an ‘aggressive’ course of chemotherapy to treat the disease and restart her immune system. 

She also recently came out in support of her friend, Christina Applegate, who went public with her MS battle earlier this month. 

Blair said during the interview that her health has been progressing positively over the past few months, but wanted to wait until she was sure to share the latest news.

‘I was reluctant to talk about it because I felt this need to be more healed and more fixed,’ she said at the panel.

What is multiple sclerosis (MS) and what are the symptoms?

MS is a condition that can affect the brain and spinal cord, causing a wide range of potential symptoms, including problems with vision, arm or leg movement, sensation or balance. 

The immune system attacks the protective sheath (myelin) that covers nerve fibers and causes communication problems between your brain and the rest of your body.

It’s a lifelong condition that can sometimes cause serious disability, although it can occasionally be mild.

A study of the incidence of MS, developed in conjunction with Public Health England (PHE), estimates that 18% of total MS diagnoses in the UK are in people age 30 or under. This is compared to the previous estimate of only 12%.

There are 130,000 people living with MS in the UK and, in the last year alone, the charity estimates more than 1,250 people under 30 have been diagnosed. It is the most common progressive neurological condition in young people today.

When diagnosed with MS, no one can predict how the condition will affect you, how disabled you will become, or how quickly, and tens of thousands of people still have no treatment to help as their MS advances.

Between flare-ups of symptoms, MS sufferers may also have phases of recovery after treatment, that are called remissions.

‘I’ve accrued a lifetime of some baggage in the brain that still needs a little sorting out or accepting. That took me a minute to get to that acceptance. It doesn’t look like this for everyone.’

‘I have really felt unwell and misunderstood for so long that it’s just, me,’ she added.

‘It’s not that MS was on a path killing me. I mean it was killing me with this flare lasting so long,’ she continued.

Battle: Blair underwent an 'aggressive' course of chemotherapy to treat the disease and restart her immune system (pictured above in her new documentary)

Battle: Blair underwent an ‘aggressive’ course of chemotherapy to treat the disease and restart her immune system (pictured above in her new documentary) 

Pulling through: Blair said how an MS diagnosis can be 'isolating' but was determined to get through it for her son Arthur, 10 (Pictured above)

Pulling through: Blair said how an MS diagnosis can be ‘isolating’ but was determined to get through it for her son Arthur, 10 (Pictured above) 

Blair said how an MS diagnosis can be ‘isolating’ but was determined to get through it for her son Arthur.

‘I was so burnt out. If there was an option to halt me, to rebalance after being hit so hard with that last flare, it’s absolutely for my son. I have no desire to leave him alone right now.’  

The Cruel Intentions star also praised the wealth of support she received from her friends and family.

‘People took great care of me. I never really like life. I do now – strange, huh?’ she went on. ‘Just because life’s so weird. I was so scared in life. To suddenly start to find an identity and a safety in me, to figure out boundaries, time management and energy. I’m having the time of my life.’

'Loving you always': Selma recently showed her support for her friend Christina Applegate who is also suffering from MS (the pair pictured together in 2002)

‘Loving you always’: Selma recently showed her support for her friend Christina Applegate who is also suffering from MS (the pair pictured together in 2002)

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