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Trisha Goddardreveals hot flushes help her to run in cold temperatures

She famously has a gruelling exercise regime. 

And Trisha Goddard revealed on Wednesday that going through menopause was an unlikely aid to her relentless fitness training. 

Speaking to Runners’ World UK, the legendary TV presenter, 63, said the hot flushes caused by the biological change helped her to run in-11°C temperatures in Boston. 

Bright side: Trisha Goddard revealed on Wednesday that going through the menopause was an unlikely aid to her gruelling exercise regime as it meant she could run in colder temperatures 

Many women experience hot flushes while going through the menopause, which are caused by changes in your hormone levels that affect your body’s temperature.  

Trisha detailed that her unpredictable waves of warmth actually worked in her favour when it came to pounding the pavement, saying: ‘I was running in Boston when I was going through the menopause, and the hot flushes were great because the temperature was -11°C. I’ll run in snow, sleet, rain.’ 

However, it wasn’t all smooth sailing for the star who has previously detailed how she began the menopause just 48hrs after being diagnosed with breast cancer in 2008. 

She explained: When I was diagnosed with breast cancer, I was terrified. I went for a run, and it was sleeting, and I remember holding my head up, letting it sting my face, thinking, ‘I may never feel this again.’ I’d never felt so alive.”  

Helpful: The legendary TV presenter said the hot flushes caused by the biological change meant it was easier to run in chilly conditions

Helpful: The legendary TV presenter said the hot flushes caused by the biological change meant it was easier to run in chilly conditions 

She continued: ‘Running helped my recovery from breast cancer. I ran all the way through my treatment, and it was bloody hard, but it kept my head together, and because the doctors were constantly checking on me, they could see the physical benefits. 

‘Chemotherapy and cancer drugs leach the calcium from you, so your bone density is checked before and after treatment. Mine was optimum at the start, and a year later, I’d only lost half a per cent. 

‘I was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2008 and had a year of chemo, radiotherapy and operations. My default was to run every day, so I’d park my car, then run 20 minutes to the hospital, on the other side of the park. 

‘When I ran there for my first session, the radiotherapy technician said, “You won’t be doing that anymore. Most people can barely walk through the door. Don’t get any ideas about running every day, just rest.” 

‘I was so angry with him that I made sure I did run every day. Now I remember him with fondness because I need people like that. I only need to be told I can’t and then I do.’    

Full on: However, it wasn't all smooth sailing for the star who has previously detailed how she began the menopause just 48hrs after being diagnosed with breast cancer in 2008

Full on: However, it wasn’t all smooth sailing for the star who has previously detailed how she began the menopause just 48hrs after being diagnosed with breast cancer in 2008 

Trisha has long been an exercise fanatic and shocked fans during her stint on Dancing On Ice with her gruelling work out schedule. 

The chat show queen was enduring daily 10k cycles and runs, and three weight training ­sessions every week.

‘I always like to take up a new ­challenge before every birthday,’ she said. ‘Every now and then I like to do a mad ­physical.’

‘Most days I get up at 6am, get on my bike, ride 5km to the park, run between 7km and 10km, then get back on my bike. I run every day. I weight train three times a week. I love constant physical activity. 

Trisha said her fitness journey helped her through her breast cancer. She had to undergo chemotherapy and previously said the drugs made her weight rocket. 

But since taking up running at the ripe age of 42, she dropped 2st 7lbs between 2008 and 2013. 

Fighting fit: Trisha has long been an exercise fanatic and shocked fans during her stint on Dancing On Ice with her weight training, 10k cycles, and runs

Fighting fit: Trisha has long been an exercise fanatic and shocked fans during her stint on Dancing On Ice with her weight training, 10k cycles, and runs

The 62-year-old popped up on ITV with her show in 1998 and regularly attracted over one million viewers. 

Out now: Read the full Trisha Goddard interview in the January issue of Runner’s World UK, on sale from today

Out now: Read the full Trisha Goddard interview in the January issue of Runner’s World UK, on sale from today

Speaking on Loose Women in November, Trisha said she had fillers after her face ‘fell in’ following her cancer treatment.

In a segment on plastic surgery, she said: ‘I believe in being honest. When I was going through chemotherapy and I was on air, my face literally fell in so I had fillers there.’

Trisha previously told MailOnline: ‘I had some very low moments during chemotherapy. How can I describe the pain? It’s similar to chronic arthritis and you feel as if you’re 103 years old.

‘Every connective tissue is screaming out and, one day, I could not stand up. I started panicking.

‘But then I remember being told how it helps to breathe deeply and slowly through pain. I was skeptical but I did breathing exercises for about ten minutes and then, thankfully, it started to work.’

Read the full Trisha Goddard interview in the January issue of Runner’s World UK, on sale from today 

One in ten women has had suicidal thoughts because of perimenopause

A survey by the women’s health website Health and Her found that one in ten women has had suicidal thoughts directly related to perimenopause.

The survey of 2,000 UK women aged 46-60 who have experienced perimenopause was carried out by OnePol. 

It found that nine per cent of women who went through perimenopause admitted to having suicidal thoughts.

Meanwhile, 86 per cent said they had suffered mental health issues as a result of their menopause symptoms. 

The same survey found that 37 per cent of women did not seek any help with their symptoms, and eight out of ten said they had not discussed them with their partners.    

  


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