Health

COVID-19 death rates in almost every US state have flattened to record-low levels

Even as COVID-19 cases rise across the U.S., deaths have not done the same and – in fact – have remained relatively flat. 

On Wednesday, the country recorded 68,771 new cases with a seven-day rolling average of 63,842, which is a 322 percent increase from the 15,126 average recorded three weeks ago. 

Comparatively, the U.S. recorded 387 virus-related deaths and a rolling average of 281, which is 27 percent higher than the 220 three weeks prior.

In fact, the average has remained below 300 since June 25. 

In most states, COVID-19 fatalities have plateaued with a death rate below 1.0 per 100,000 – proving the effectiveness of vaccines.

But in recent virus hot spots – such as Arkansas, Florida and Missouri, deaths are finally increasing behind cases due to the spread of the Indian ‘Delta’ variant with some at their highest since February.  

Scroll down below to see how well the death rate is in your state. 

While average U.S. coronavirus cases rise by 322% over the last three weeks, deaths have risen just 27%

Average virus-related has remained below 300 since June 25, showing the effectiveness of vaccines (above)

Average virus-related has remained below 300 since June 25, showing the effectiveness of vaccines (above)

ALABAMA

In Alabama, deaths remained relatively flat at around a rolling average of two or three deaths.

However, they have slightly increased over the past week, from an average of two on July 20 to an average of four on July 27.

The seven=day average rate per 100,000 people remains low, currently sitting at 0.98 deaths per 100,000

During the state’s peak in January, Alabama was recording an average of 11.91 deaths per 100,000.

ALASKA

Alaska’s deaths have maintained a consistent peaks and valleys pattern throughout the course of the pandemic.

Currently, the state is among its lowest levels ever, recording no new deaths for the past four days and maintaining a seven-day rolling average of zero since February 26, 2021, CDC dat show.

The seven-day death rate per 100,000 currently sits at 0.41 per 100,000 – far below the peak of 4.51 per 100,000 recorded on December 3 of last year.

ARIZONA 

Since May of this year, COVID-19 deaths in Arizona have remained relatively flat.

Over the last week, deaths ever so slightly rose from a seven-day rolling average of eight on July 20 to an average of nine on July 27.

Similarly, the death rate has minimally increased from 0.85 per 100,000 to 0.91 per 100,000.

During the winter surge of 2021, Arizona was recording about 175 deaths per day with a rate of 16.88 per 100,000. 

ARKANSAS

For the past few weeks, Arkansas has been one of the nation’s COVID-19 hotspots seeing all metrics, including deaths, rise.

In the last month, the seven-day rolling average has risen more than five-fold from two per day to 11 per day.

At the beginning of July, Arkansas was recording 0.63 deaths per 100,000. Now, the rate is 2.65 per 100,000.

Arkansas Gov Asa Hutchinson said on Monday he’s calling a meet with state House and Senate leaders to potentially lift a law banning mask mandates.

CALIFORNIA 

Despite California COVID-19 cases increasing eight-fold from below 1,000 a day to more than 7,000 in just one month, deaths have not done the same.

Data show that virus-related fatalities have risen, but not by as much from a seven-day rolling average of eight per day to an average of 21 per day.

What’s more, the death rate per 100,000 has barely doubled from 0.14 per 100,000 on July to 0.37 per 100,000 on July 27.

This is far and away below the peak of 12.2 per 100,000 in January.

COLORADO

COVID-19 deaths have been declining in Colorado since mid-June and have consistently remained low. 

The state is currently recording a seven-day rolling averages of five per days and a rate of 0.63 per 100,000.

These figures are consistent with numbers reported during September 2020 at the send of the second wave during the summer.

By comparison, Colorado recorded a record-high average of 101 deaths per day and a rate of 12.38 per 100,000 in mid-December 2020.

CONNECTICUT  

Connecticut is recording its lowest level of virus-related deaths seen since the start of the pandemic.

No deaths have been reported in five of the last seven days, according to CDC data. 

In fact, since June 30, the state has been reporting a seven-day rolling average of zero average deaths per day and a seven-day death rate of 0.17 per 100,000 deaths. 

Unlike most states, because it was among the earliest hit, Connecticut’s record was seen in April 2020 with seven-day rolling average of  116 deaths per day and a rate of 22.86 per 100,000.

DELAWARE 

Similarly to Alaska, Delaware has seen a peaks and valleys pattern when it comes to COVID-19 deaths.

Deaths are currently at their lowest ever, with a seven-day rolling average of zero per day since June 29.

Throughout the month of July, officials have reported just four fatalities linked to the virus for a death rate of 0.1 per 100,000 – a sharp drop from the February peak of 13 per 100,000.

FLORIDA

After seeing consistent declines in deaths since the end of March, Florida is seeing a rise once again.

The state is currently reporting a seven-day rolling average of 57 deaths per day, more than double the 22 per day reported on July 6.

Similarly, the death rate has increased from 0.73 per 100,000 to 1.88 per 100,000 – not seen since early June.

However, the office of Florida Gov Ron DeSantis says he will not declare a state of emergency and has no plans to issue new restrictions.

GEORGIA

Deaths in Georgia continue to remain low, reaching levels similar to those seen in late July 2020.

For the last month, the seven-day rolling average has hovered between six per day and 10 per day.

Similarly, the death rate sits at 0.69 per 100,000, which is an exponential decline from the 10.93 per 100,000 record hit in mid-November 2020.

HAWAII  

The millions of tourists flocking to the tropical destination, have not affected death rates, which have remained consistently low since late February.

Hawaii has been recording a seven-day rolling average of zero since June 22 and has reported just 12 deaths this months.

The death rate has risen from 0.14 per 100,000 to 0.41 per 100,000 this month, but remains far below the record-high of 5.58 per 100,000 in January.

IDAHO

For the past month, Idaho has been recording some of its lowest levels of COVID-19 deaths to date.

Since June 28, the seven-day rolling average has sat between zero per day and two per day.

The death rate currently remains the same figure it was at the beginning of the month at 0.67 deaths per 100.000. 

The record was hit in December 2020 when Idaho was reporting 7.83 deaths per 100,000. 

ILLINOIS 

Illinois’s COVID-19-related deaths are at their lowest since the pandemic first struck last year.

The state’s seven-day rolling average sits at five per day, which was  figure not recorded since March 28, 2020. 

Meanwhile, the death rate is 0.32 per 100,000, a drop of 0.45 per 100,000 this month and a massive fall from 10.14 reported in December 2020.

INDIANA

In nearby Indiana, deaths are also flattening with a seven-day rolling average of two per day.

The death rate has fallen since the beginning of the month from 0.48 per 100,000 to 0.25 per 100,000.

This rate is a far cry from the winter surge of 2020-2021 when the state saw 11 deaths per 100,000 in mid-December 2020. 

IOWA 

COVID-19 deaths in Iow have remained consistently flat since the beginning of May with few increases.

The state has been recording a seven-day rolling average of one per day since July 14 and reported 32 deaths this month.

The death rate is among its lowest ever, sitting at 0.38 per 100,000, which represents a decline from 0.51 per 100,000 at the start of the month.

At its peak in early December, Iowa reported 18.76 deaths per 100,000. 

KANSAS 

Deaths linked to the virus in Texas had flattened before starting to rise this week.

Over the last seven days, the rolling average has exponentially risen from one per day to six per day.

What’s more, the death rate has risen from 0.34 per 100,000 on July 20 to 1.54 per 100,000 on July 27.

It’s the first time since May 13, that the death rate has surpassed 1.0 per 100,000. 

KENTUCKY

Virus-related deaths have remained flat since the beginning of June in The Bluegrass State.

Over the last month, the seven-day rolling average has never risen above two per day and the death rate currently sits at 0.43 per 100,000.

Comparatively, in late December, Kentucky reported a record 9.36 per 100,000 deaths and a rolling average of 59 per day. 

LOUISIANA 

Louisiana has recently been dealing with a rapid rise in cases due to the Delta variant and deaths have started to rise as well.

At the beginning of July, Louisiana was recording an average of four deaths per day and a rate of 0.67 per 100,000.

Now the average is 10 deaths per day and the rate is 1.57 per 100,000, making first time since May 20, that the rate has surpassed 1.0.

Health officers that of all the deaths that occurred since vaccines rolled out, just 30 have been in fully vaccinated people. 

MAINE

COVID-19 deaths in Maine have followed a pattern of peaks and valleys since the start of the pandemic.

Currently, the state is at a peak seven-day rolling average sit at one with a death rate of 0.89 per 100,000.

This is a dramatic rise of an average of no deaths at the start of the month with a death rate of 0.15 per 100,000.

However, it’s still far below the peak of 6.03 per 100,000 seen in mid-January.

MARYLAND 

In Maryland, deaths continue to remain low, with a rolling average of three deaths per day, which has been consistent for most of June and July and far below the slowdown seen after the summer 2020 surge.

Meanwhile, the death rate is at 0.35 per 100,000 – higher than the 0.26 recorded at the beginning of July but below the rates seen for most of the pandemic.

Maryland saw the worst of the pandemic during the first wave with an average of 58 deaths per day and a rate of 6.75 per 100,000.

MASSACHUSETTS

Since mid-June, Massachusetts’s seven-day rolling average has remained flat, not recording above four per day.

There has been a rise, however, from 0.16 deaths per 100,000 at the start of the month to 0.46 per 100,000 as of July 27.

Notably, this is nowhere near the record-high figures recorded on April 24, 2020 of 179 deaths per day and 8.22 per 100,000. 

MICHIGAN 

After dealing with a surge in cases during spring 2020, deaths in Michigan have consistently declined. 

Currently, the seven-day rolling average sits at two per day, which is the lowest figure seen since March 20, 2020.

Meanwhile, the death rate of 0.16 per 100,000 is also at a record-low level.  

MINNESOTA

Throughout the month of July, virus-related deaths in Minnesota have remained relatively flat.

The seven-day rolling average has declined from five per day on July 1 to two per day as of July 27.

Over the same period, the death rate has been slashed by more than half from 0.67 per 100,000 to 0.28 per 100,000.

The state peaked in mid-December with a rolling average of 66 and a death rate of 8.36 per 100,000. 

MISSISSIPPI 

The South continues to remain a COVID-19 epicenter rand Mississippi is no exception.

The seven-day rolling average has not risen by much from zero new deaths per day to two per day but the death rate has more than doubled from 0.2 per day to 0.47 per day.

State Health Officer Dr Thomas Dobbs told reporters at a press conference last week that 89 percent of all COVID-19 deaths in the past month have been among unvaccinated individuals.

MISSOURI

Missouri has been battling an outbreak linked to the Indian ‘Delta’ variant and has seen deaths rise since then.

The state was recording a seven-day rolling average at the beginning of the month with a death rate of 1.25 per 100,000.

These figures have since risen to 15 deaths per day and a rate of 1.76 per 100,000, the highest recorded since February.

MONTANA

Deaths in Montana are close to reaching the lowest levels seen since the start of the pandemic.

For the past six days, the seven-day rolling average has sat at zero and the dearth rate is currently 0.47 per 100,000.

Both are a far cry from the 17 deaths per day and 11.51 per 100,000 recorded at the height in late January 2021.

NEBRASKSA

Since mid-June, virus-related deaths in Nebraska have flattened to levels similar to those seen in March 2020.

For the majority of July, the state has been reporting a seven-day rolling average of zero deaths and the lowest death rate of any state at zero deaths per 100,000.

At its peak in early December 2020, the state saw 31 average deaths per day and 11.27 per 100,0000 

NEVADA

After a straight decline from late April to early July, deaths are once again on the rise in Nevada, similar to cases.

The seven-day rolling average has quadrupled from three per day on July 9 to 12 per day on July 27.

Similarly, over the same time period, the death rate has risen from 0.75 deaths per 100,000 to 2.76 per 100,000 

More states will be added. 


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