Science

Gardeners rejoice! Experts predict an imminent SURGE of flowers in the UK

Gardeners rejoice! Experts predict an imminent SURGE of flowers in the UK following an unusually cold April that held back blooms by up to three weeks

  • Last month saw the most overnight frosts in April since records began
  • This has held back summer flower blooms by as much as three weeks
  • Delayed summer flowers including salvias, cannas and dahlias are expected to flourish over the next few days 

If your garden is usually in full spring by this time of year, you may be feeling rather disappointed at the current display.

But before you panic, the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) has reassured that a surge of flower colour is on its way in the UK.

The RHS says that an unusually cold April has held back blooms by as much as three weeks – a phenomenon known as ‘seasonal compression.’

Thankfully, delayed summer flowers are expected to blossom in the coming days, with salvias, cannas and dahlias predicted to flourish.

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The RHS says that an unusually cold April has held back blooms by as much as three weeks – a phenomenon known as ‘seasonal compression.’ Pictured is horticulturalist Alessandra Sana sitting among the Camassias at RHS Garden Wisley

Gardening tips for May 

As bulbs fade and herbaceous borders grow in leaps and bounds, it is now clear that summer is approaching. 

Sowing and planting out bedding can begin, depending on regional weather variations, and you can take softwood cuttings. 

It’s also time to get back into the lawn mowing regime, as the lawn will be loving the warmer temperatures this month brings.

Source: RHS 

According to the RHS, last month saw the most overnight frosts in April since records began.

Spring favourites including cherry blossom and daffodils benefitted from the cold nights and a lack of heavy rain, but the frosts have delayed the blooming of summer flowers.

Guy Barter, RHS Chief, explained: ‘With so much growth and flowering held up by the cold April nights, the flowering and growing season can be compressed.

‘This means that when the weather turns around, all the pent-up growth and flowers will come out in a rush leading to a brief but colourful crossover of spring and summer flowers.’

While eager gardeners can expect a surge in flower colour this week, Mr Barter warned that the warm weather will also allow dreaded weeds to flourish.

He suggests that gardeners should have hoes at the ready to keep any unwanted weeds at bay.

Among the summer flowers expected to flourish this week are salvias, cannas and dahlias, according to the RHS. 

However, rising temperatures could see spring flowers killed off in a matter of days.

Among the summer flowers expected to flourish this week are salvias, cannas and dahlias (pictured) according to the RHS

Among the summer flowers expected to flourish this week are salvias, cannas and dahlias (pictured) according to the RHS

Paul Cook, Curator of Harlow Carr, the most northerly RHS Garden, said: ‘The cooler weather has definitely boosted the displays of Erythronium (dog’s tooth violet) and Trillium in our woodland.

‘However, if we have a sudden spell of hot weather, it could see them off in a matter of days.’

If you’re thinking of jazzing up your garden, the RHS advises only buying plants and seeds from ‘reputable British garden centres or nurseries’ to minimise the risk of introdcuing new pests and diseases. 

If you're thinking of jazzing up your garden, the RHS advises only buying plants and seeds from 'reputable British garden centres or nurseries' to minimise the risk of introdcuing new pests and diseases. Pictured is a canna

If you’re thinking of jazzing up your garden, the RHS advises only buying plants and seeds from ‘reputable British garden centres or nurseries’ to minimise the risk of introdcuing new pests and diseases. Pictured is a canna

Lisa Ward, Principal Plant Health Scientist at the RHS, said: ‘The boom in gardening has seen online sales rocket over the last year, enabling many to find solace among their plants. 

‘However, gardeners need to be made aware of the issues around buying material that has not been subject to the right checks and approvals. 

‘A plant may be readily available or perhaps cheaper to buy online but the potential for that plant to cause problems on your own and surrounding plots isn’t a risk worth taking.’ 

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