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Eriksen to have ‘medical examination’ next month in hope of football return

Former Tottenham Hotspur midfielder Eriksen has not played since he suffered a cardiac arrest during a Euro 2020 match for Denmark but hopes to return to football

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Crowd roars in tribute of Christian Eriksen at Denmark’s match against Belgium

Christian Eriksen will reportedly have medical examination in October which will determine whether the former Tottenham Hotspur midfielder can return to football.

The 29-year-old, who now plies his trade for Inter Milan, collapsed during Denmark’s opening Euro 2020 match against Finland in Copenhagen.

It was due to suffering a cardiac arrest, needing life-saving CPR treatment that saw him revived on the pitch in harrowing scenes.

Eriksen was fitted with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) in his chest to regulate his heartbeat following stabilisation in hospital, but serious doubts emerged as to whether he could play the game again.

The law in Italy states that no person can play sport at any level if their heart has significant abnormalities.



Eriksen hopes to play football again following a pivotal medical examination
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Their football governing body revealed in July that Eriksen would need the ICD removed in order to feature in Serie A.

The ex-Spurs playmaker returned to Inter’s training ground last month for the first time since his cardiac arrest to undergo medical checks and the Italian champions declared that he was in ‘excellent physical and mental condition’.

Gazzetta dello Sport report that Eriksen will have a check-up in October must either stay in his body for good or can be removed.

An ICD sends an electrical pulse to correct irregular rhythms



The footballing world stood still as Eriksen was treated
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Danish doctors are said to be in in ‘constant communication’ with Inter’s medical team over whether the player can return to training.

Eriksen is currently in Milan with his family but should he be given permission, could take part in individual training and even play football in a Danish sports facility while he waits for the results.

The Italian FA’s technical scientific committee member, Francesco Braconaro, has outlined that the removal of the defibrillator would demonstrate Eriksen has no further heart problems.









Speaking to Radio Kiss Kiss in July, Braconaro stated: “Christian Eriksen cannot be given the all-clear to play in Italy.

“If the player has the defibrillator removed, therefore confirming the pathology can be resolved, then he can return to play for Inter.”

Eriksen’s collapse shocked the footballing world during the European Championships.

He collapsed late in the first half of his nation’s clash with Finland before lost 1-0 to after a highly-debated resumption of the game less than two hours after English referee Anthony Taylor had swiftly stopped play to allow medics to attend to the Dane.



Eriksen is back in Milan following his operation
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Inter via Getty Images)




He was released after six days in hospital and Denmark reached the semi-finals of the tournament, losing to England at Wembley in a valiant effort.

Taylor recently told BBC Sport of the incident: “I could tell straight away. Christian was on his own.

“The only thing that was close to him was a bouncing ball which hit his knee. I was actually looking directly at him when he fell over. I could see his face as he fell. I knew straightaway something was wrong because of how his face looked and how he fell to the floor.







“That is what concerned me the most,” he explained.

“My main priority is the safety of the players. That means if a player is injured or not well, they need medical help. That is all I did. I called a doctor on to the field.

“Nothing else hit me until the following day when I was travelling back to [the match officials’ base in] Istanbul. The real heroes on that night were the Danish captain [Simon Kjaer] and the medics who performed the initial CPR and defibrillation.”




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