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Anti-social orders fall by a THIRD in six years… despite incidents soaring, news figures show 

Anti-social orders fall as cases rocket: Moves to prevent yobbish behaviour fall by a THIRD in six years… despite incidents soaring, news figures show

  • From April 2019 to March 2020, number of anti-social incidents rose by 675,580
  • Record two-fifths of people experienced anti-social behaviour in past 12 months 
  • Criminal Behaviour Orders were introduced in 2014, replacing so-called ASBOs

The number of criminal orders to prevent anti-social behaviour has fallen by a third in six years – despite cases rocketing, figures show.

The use of criminal behaviour orders –the updated ‘Asbo’ – has even fallen by up to two-thirds in parts of the country.

However, figures show that the number of anti-social incidents has surged by 50 per cent in a year. 

The revelation will be embarrassing for Boris Johnson who pledged a blitz on crime last month, saying ‘yobs’ should work in ‘chain gangs’.

In 2015, 952 criminal behaviour orders (CBOs) were issued in England and Wales, compared with just 607 in 2020. 

This is a fall of one-third, with the number dropping by almost two-thirds in Avon and Somerset and North Wales. 

But two-fifths of people have experienced anti-social behaviour in the past year – the highest on record, according to data.

David Lammy, the Labour justice spokesman, said: ‘The Government is failing to tackle sky-rocketing anti-social behaviour because its 11 years of cuts have pushed the justice system to the brink of collapse.’ 

From April 2019 to March 2020, anti-social incidents rose from 1,346,691 to 2,022,271.

Two-fifths of people have experienced anti-social behaviour in the past year – the highest on record, according to data (file photo of teenage group of boys in Manchester)

Launching the crime fightback, the PM said he wanted to see greater numbers of criminals wearing hi-vis jackets being put to work cleaning streets and open spaces.

He said he aimed to see many more offenders ‘visibly paying their debt to society’ after being found guilty of anti-social behaviour.

It came after the Home Secretary said offenders should make public reparations for their crimes by tidying up estates and doing other work valuable to their local areas.

Police chiefs, however, dismissed the plans as a ‘gimmick’ – and the Home Office said there was no question of offenders being shackled.

Other announcements include expanding stop and search and electronically tagging burglars to prevent reoffending.

Criminal Behaviour Orders were introduced in 2014, replacing Anti-Social Behaviour Orders, and are aimed at preventing anti-social behaviour.

ASBOs were said to have become a ‘badge of honour’ under Labour before Theresa May junked them while she was Home Secretary.

CBOs are given to offenders sentenced to a crime by the courts and ban them from engaging in specified activities or going to certain places.

The latest statistics will be embarrassing for Boris Johnson who pledged a blitz on crime last month, saying ‘yobs’ should work in ‘chain gangs’

The latest statistics will be embarrassing for Boris Johnson who pledged a blitz on crime last month, saying ‘yobs’ should work in ‘chain gangs’

Every area in England and Wales saw an increase in people being subjected to yobbishness and vandalism in the past five years

Every area in England and Wales saw an increase in people being subjected to yobbishness and vandalism in the past five years 

Earlier this year, figures revealed that nearly 20per cent of people had experienced anti-social behaviour in the past year during the pandemic.

The number is the highest on record and means anti-social behaviour affected a million more people in that time.

The number of people suffering incidents also jumped 5.5million in the past decade, according to analysis of crime figures.

Every area in England and Wales saw an increase in people being subjected to yobbishness and vandalism in the past five years.

Anti-social behaviour reported to the police normally relates to incidents such as large groups being noisy in residential areas at night, or reports of verbal abuse.

It can also include more serious issues, such as drug use and dealing, and graffiti and other damage to property.

The rise – found in an analysis of the Crime Survey in England and Wales (CSEW) – showed the jump is an exception in a year in which nearly all other kinds of crime have fallen.

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