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Boris Johnson ‘declares war’ on rip-off petrol stations

Boris Johnson ‘declares war’ on rip-off petrol stations: Ministers are drawing up ways of ‘naming and shaming’ garages that fail to pass on fuel duty cut

  • Boris Johnson is pushing to name and shame garages that don’t pass on duty cut
  • The government temporarily reduced duty by 5p in March but prices keep rising
  • Transport Secretary Grant Shapps is said to have mooted ‘pump watch’ scheme

Boris Johnson has ordered ministers to find ways to ‘expose’ petrol stations that fail to pass on lower prices from the Government’s fuel duty cut.

The PM is pushing for action after figures last week showed average petrol prices exceeded £1.70 per litre for the first time – despite the Chancellor introducing a 5p per litre duty cut on March 23.

Department for Transport officials have been tasked with drawing up plans to ‘name and shame’ garages that choose to raise profit margins rather than pass on the cut to customers.

The PM is pushing for action after figures last week showed average petrol prices exceeded £1.70 per litre for the first time – despite the government introducing a 5p per litre duty cut on March 23 (picture posed by a model)

Boris Johnson has ordered ministers to find ways to 'expose' petrol stations that fail to pass on lower prices from the Government's fuel duty cut

Boris Johnson has ordered ministers to find ways to ‘expose’ petrol stations that fail to pass on lower prices from the Government’s fuel duty cut

According to Sunday Telegraph, Transport Secretary Grant Shapps has suggested a ‘pump watch’ name-and-shame scheme. 

A Downing Street source said: ‘Officials are considering mechanisms available to expose those companies that aren’t passing on tax benefits to consumers.’

Figures last week showed the average price for a litre of petrol exceeded £1.70 per litre for the first time ever.

It has increased by 41p in the last 12 months, adding around £23 to the cost of filling a typical 55-litre family car.

The average price of a litre of petrol at UK forecourts on Tuesday was 170.4p, according to data firm Experian Catalist. Diesel also reached a record high of 181.4p per litre.

Chancellor Rishi Sunak implemented a 5p per litre cut in fuel duty on March 23, two days after average prices were 166.8p for petrol and 180.3p for diesel – but retailers have since been accused of raising profit margins.

Demands to slash fuel duty and VAT by 40 per cent were raised in Parliament last after more than 102,000 signatures were collected for a petition outlining the two-year proposal to combat soaring costs for fuel.

MPs debated the petition on reducing fuel duty and VAT in Westminster Hall and, while not specifically endorsing the proposal, called for the Government to go further to help.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps (pictured) has apparently suggested a 'pump watch' name-and-shame scheme

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps (pictured) has apparently suggested a ‘pump watch’ name-and-shame scheme

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