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Broom-wielding Chinese grandmother, 95, busts out of Shanghai quarantine THREE TIMES

An elderly broom-wielding Chinese woman busted out of quarantine in Shanghai three times and evaded guards wearing hazmat suits trying to enforce the city’s zero-Covid lockdown, video has shown.

The 95-year-old was seen in one video walking down the street in an attempt to break free of the city-wide lockdown when she was stopped by one of the guards.

But the man, who tried to block her path with a wooden broom, was in for a surprise when she jumped into action and pushed her way past him.

The flustered guard again positioned himself in front of the woman to stop her from getting any further down the street, but she grabbed the broom handle and tried snatch it from his grasp.

An elderly broom-wielding Chinese woman (pictured) busted out of quarantine in Shanghai three times and evaded guards wearing hazmat suits trying to enforce the city’s zero-Covid lockdown. Pictured: The woman is shown grabbing the broom of a medical workers in the city

This sparked a tug-of-war between the pair, with the guard – wearing full PPE – being forced to retreat backwards down the small residential backstreet.

The bewildered medical worker continued to stand in her way, but she marched towards him while angrily pointing at him and gesturing to an onlooker. 

The guard is also seen gesturing towards the elderly man watching the scene unfold, as if the guard is asking for his help with dealing with the women.

Eventually, the 95-year-old appears to give up and a second video taken nearby showed the women was put into a small confinement area nearby.

But this did not deter her, as she was able to break free of a corrugated iron cage.

The medical worker who tried to block her path with a wooden broom was in for a surprise when she pushed her way past him.

This sparked a tug-of-war between the pair, with the guard - wearing full PPE - being forced to retreat backwards down the small residential backstreet

The medical worker who tried to block her path with a wooden broom was in for a surprise when she pushed her way past him (pictured left). The woman grabbed the boom, sparking a tug-of-war between the pair, with the guard – wearing full PPE – being forced to retreat backwards down the small residential backstreet

Eventually, the 95-year-old appears to give up as the man orders her away (pictured). A second video taken nearby showed the women was put into a small confinement area nearby

Eventually, the 95-year-old appears to give up as the man orders her away (pictured). A second video taken nearby showed the women was put into a small confinement area nearby

She was then reported to have returned home by jumping over the wall of the quarantine centre. According to The Daily Telegraph, the woman staged three daring escapes in total.

In one photo of the determined woman, six guards in hazmat suits can be seen running away from her as she marches towards them – a metal pole in hand.

Finally, another video showed the woman being carted off in the back of a yellow tricycle by a group at least six of the hazmat-wearing medical workers, escorting her down an otherwise empty road.

One neighbour posted on social media: ‘The old lady was taken away by a tricycle yesterday; she climbed the wall of the quarantine centre and got back the same evening.’ 

It is believed that the woman lived in a flat close to where the videos were filmed, and that she came to the attention of local police when her neighbours reported her walking around outside – having recently tested positive for Covid-19.

China’s ‘zero-COVID’ strategy shut down most businesses in the city on March 28, while millions of residents have been locked down in their homes in an attempt to contain the spread. 

‘The old lady is trying everything to ‘prison break’,’ the video’s description said, as it was posted to Chinese social media.

One user wrote in response to the video: ‘We all should learn from this lady. There is no need to wait for or depend on anyone, but gain our freedom with action.’

The lady was not the only rebellious elderly woman in China. In another video, a medical worker was seen trying to take a PCR test from an old woman sitting on a wall. Every time their hand came near her, she swatted them away with a stick.

The persistent medical worker tried a number of times, but with each try, they were met with an even fiercer riposte.

Earlier this month, a Chinese medical worker in Shanghai made headlines when they chased down a pet corgi and beat it to death with a shovel because its owner was infected with Covid-19.

In one photo of the determined woman, six guards in hazmat suits can be seen running away from her as she marches towards them - a metal pole in hand

In one photo of the determined woman, six guards in hazmat suits can be seen running away from her as she marches towards them – a metal pole in hand

Video shows a Covid prevention worker, who is wearing a full PPE suit, chasing the small dog down a street in the residential area in the Pudong district of the city.

The corgi is seen trying to hide behind a car but the health worker lunges forward and hits the dog three times with a large shovel. The pet is then seen lying motionless on the street.

Footage of the attack has gone viral on Weibo and sparked outrage amongst locals, who are growing frustrated of the harsh lockdown conditions that are leading to shortages of food and basic necessities.  

Photos show the corgi running after a bus that is said to be taking its owner to an isolation centre for quarantine after they tested positive for Covid. The dog was then beaten to death by the health worker, with its body later placed in a yellow bag.

The corgi’s owner had released the dog onto the streets after they could not find anyone to care for his pet whilst he was in quarantine, reported China News Weekly. 

The dog’s owner wrote on a community Weibo chat: ‘We hoped to let him outside and be like a stray dog. We didn’t want him to starve to death. 

‘As long as he could live it would be ok. We never expected that he would be beaten to death the moment we had left.’  

Pictured: The horrifying moment that a health worker in Shanghai chased down a pet corgi and beat it to death with a shovel because its owner was infected with Covid earlier this month

Pictured: The horrifying moment that a health worker in Shanghai chased down a pet corgi and beat it to death with a shovel because its owner was infected with Covid earlier this month

The dead corgi's body lays next to the health worker

The health worker stands next to the dead corgi

The health worker is seen in the footage beating the corgi to death 

Covid prevention worker chases corgi

The health worker then beats corgi to death

Video shows a Covid prevention worker, who is wearing a full PPE suit, chasing the small dog down a street (left) in the residential area in the Pudong district of the city before hitting it with a shovel (right)

Photos show the corgi running after a bus that is said to be taking its owner to an isolation centre for quarantine after they tested positive for Covid. The dog was then beaten to death by the health worker, with its body later placed in a yellow bag

Photos show the corgi running after a bus that is said to be taking its owner to an isolation centre for quarantine after they tested positive for Covid. The dog was then beaten to death by the health worker, with its body later placed in a yellow bag

The dog’s owner has claimed the neighbourhood committee refused to help care for the the corgi, whilst the committee said it was concerned the pet could have been infected too.

Several cases of Covid spreading from humans to pets including dogs and cats have been recorded but there has not been any confirmed cases of animals then passing the virus back to humans, despite anecdotal reports. 

The footage of the 95-year-old woman came as Officials in Shanghai promised Friday to ease anti-virus controls on truck drivers that are hampering food supplies and trade – that has resulted in huge backlash from the city’s residents.

But streets in Shanghai were largely empty on Friday despite an easing of restrictions that confined most of its 25 million people to their homes. Many residents still were barred from leaving their neighborhoods.

A deputy mayor, Zhang Wei, promised ‘every effort’ to resolve problems that prompted complaints about lack of food and fears the shutdown of China’s most populous city might disrupt global trade.

Shanghai leaders are scrambling to ease the impact of a ‘zero-COVID’ strategy that shut down most businesses starting March 28.

Pictured: A worker in protective suit disinfects the ground in front of a residential compound amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Shanghai, China April 21, 2022

Pictured: A worker in protective suit disinfects the ground in front of a residential compound amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Shanghai, China April 21, 2022

Most factories and offices remained closed despite changes in anti-virus curbs since last week that have allowed 12.3 million people out of their homes.

In one neighborhood, a woman rode a skateboard and a couple took a child’s photo outside a park. Delivery drivers rode past on scooters while government employees in white suits sprayed disinfectant on trash bags.

‘You can only walk the dog,’ said resident Isabella Kao, who cannot leave her apartment compound because nearby areas are quarantined. ‘There’s no point in going out because all your stores are closed, right?’

On Friday, the government reported 11 coronavirus deaths and 17,529 new cases in Shanghai. All but 1,931 had no symptoms. Shanghai accounted for 95% of the 18,598 new cases on China’s mainland, of which 2,133 had symptoms.

China’s infection numbers in its biggest outbreak since the start of the pandemic in 2020 are low compared with other major countries. But the ruling Communist Party has suspended access to Shanghai and some other major cities to isolate every case, fueling public frustration and warnings about the rising cost.

Truck drivers who bring food to Shanghai and goods to its port, the world’s busiest, are hampered by multiple checkpoints and virus tests. That has led to long waits and reports that some shipping companies and drivers are avoiding Shanghai.

Under the new system, drivers are allowed through if they have had a negative virus test within the past 48 hours, no fever and a ‘green health code’ on their smartphone that shows they haven’t been to areas with outbreaks, according to Wu Chungeng, director of the Highway Bureau of the Ministry of Transportation.

‘All localities should directly release them,’ Wu said, according to news reports.

Pictured: A worker in a protective suit sits near a police line outside a store, following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Shanghai, China April 21, 2022

Pictured: A worker in a protective suit sits near a police line outside a store, following the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Shanghai, China April 21, 2022

Meanwhile, some 80,000 small enterprises in government-owned buildings in Shanghai will be given six months’ free rent, the director of the city’s commission for state-owned assets, Bai Tinghui, said at the news conference with Zhang, according to state media.

The government has made 65 billion yuan ($10 billion) in ‘support loans’ to Shanghai businesses and distributed other financial aid, the online news outlet The Paper reported, citing city officials.

Officials said the Shanghai port is operating normally, according to news reports. But they cited daily cargo volume equivalent to 100,000 containers, down almost 30% from the normal level of 140,000 containers.

Authorities are enforcing a three-tier system that allows residents out of their homes if their area has had no new infections in the past week. They can leave the neighbourhood after two weeks without a case. Supermarkets and pharmacies are reopening.

Some residents say they came close to being allowed out before a new case was found in a neighbouring building and the wait started from scratch.

Kao, 38, who runs a trading company, said she and her partner have spent most of the six weeks since March 11 in their apartment. She said they were allowed to go to other parts of the city for only four days during that time.

Kao said her building is a ‘control area,’ which means they are allowed outside, but around it is a ‘closed area’ whose residents are confined to their homes. ‘I feel the people of Shanghai are puzzled by the current anti-epidemic policy,’ Kao said.      


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