UK

Charing Cross constable had conviction for threatening to murder female colleague 

James McLoughlin-Goodchild, a PC at Charing Cross police station, threatened to stab the woman and two other officers if they came to arrest him

One of the police officers whose disturbing messages formed part of an inquiry into the culture of racism and misogyny in the Met threatened to murder a female colleague while under investigation for sexually harassing her.

James McLoughlin-Goodchild, a PC at Charing Cross police station, threatened to stab the woman and two other officers if they came to arrest him during a phone call with a sergeant to discuss an upcoming gross misconduct hearing. 

A trial heard he said: ‘I will kill them, I will murder them if I see them, I know where they live and what cars they drive.

‘If they come to my home and arrest me they are going to get stabbed. I will not go to prison alive.’ 

The officer was found guilty of sending an offensive, indecent, obscene or menacing communication after a trial at Hendon Magistrates Court in January 2019. He was handed a 12-month conditional discharge and an indefinite restraining order. 

The grim revelations are just the latest in a series of scandals for beleaguered Met Police chief Dame Cressida Dick – who is already under pressure over her late decision to investigate the Downing St Partygate scandal.

Home Secretary Priti Patel blamed a ‘failure of leadership’ for the culture that has taken hold in the force – while a ‘furious’ Sadiq Khan called the Met Commissioner in for an urgent meeting. 

McLoughlin-Goodchild - who served at Charing Cross police station - was later sacked by the Met

McLoughlin-Goodchild – who served at Charing Cross police station – was later sacked by the Met

The report is just the latest scandal to hit crisis-prone Cressida Dick, and makes particularly chilling reading in light of the murder of Sarah Everard by serving Met officer Wayne Couzens - who himself was allegedly nicknamed as 'the rapist'

The report is just the latest scandal to hit crisis-prone Cressida Dick, and makes particularly chilling reading in light of the murder of Sarah Everard by serving Met officer Wayne Couzens – who himself was allegedly nicknamed as ‘the rapist’

Ms Patel added that she was ‘appalled and sickened’ by the findings of yesterday’s report into the disgraceful behaviour of more than a dozen officers – including McLoughlin-Goodchild – at Charing Cross police station, including sick jokes about rape, ‘killing black children’, and ‘f****** gays’. 

McLoughlin-Goodchild was later sacked by the Met, but remained under investigation for a series of offensive messages that were the subject of an inquiry by the Independent Office of Police Conduct, The Times reported.

The watchdog found officers at Charing Cross had exchanged sickening messages about rape, ‘killing black children’, and ‘f****** gays’.

‘I’d happily rape you’: Vile WhatsApp exchanges between Charing Cross officers  

WhatsApp conversation between two police officers:

  • Officer 1: ‘And my bird won’t stop taking the p***. Swear to got [sic] I’m going to smack her’
  • Officer 2: ‘Slap her one… say you didn’t’
  • Officer 1: ‘I`ll f****** do it. She`s f***** off home.’

A separate WhatsApp conversation between two police officers:

  • Officer 1: ‘I f****** need to take my bird out, won’t see her until next Saturday. Then I have to work. Promised to take her out the Friday after. Making it up to her from when I backhanded her’
  • Officer 2: ‘Grab her by the p****’
  • Officer 1: ‘You ever slapped your missus?’
  • Officer 1: ‘It makes them love you more. Seriously since I did that she won’t leave me alone. Now I know why these daft c**** are getting murdered by their s****** boyfriends. Knock a bird about and she will love you. Human nature. They are biologically programmed to like that s***.’
  • Officer 1: ‘I’m right though’

A further WhatsApp conversation between two police officers:

  • Officer 1: ‘I had that massive fight with my bird because she found out I’d been out on the piss with this girl who’s a high class hooker a couple of weeks ago Hahahah’
  • Officer 1: ‘Make friends with high class hookers’
  • Officer 2: ‘I had one in Watford from adult work. Used to f*** her all the time’
  • Officer 2: ‘used just hang out and blast her on the sly’
  • Officer 2: ‘when I was on roids and needed it every hour’

Messages sent by a male officer to a female officer:

  • ‘I would happily rape you’
  • ‘If I was single I would actually hate f*** you’
  • ‘If I was single I would happily chloroform you’

Further messages sent about women, include:

  • ‘Getting a woman in to bed is like spreading butter. It can be done with a bit of effort using a credit card, but it’s quicker and easier just to use a knife.’
  • ‘F*** knows what she’s on about I just wanna sp*** on her’ (sent by an officer in reference to another police officer’s girlfriend).
  • ‘Mate my Mrs is driving me mad – come and shag a baby into her it might shut her up bro.’

A male officer told a female colleague ‘I would happily rape you’ and ‘if I was single I would happily chloroform you’. 

Another officer was known as ‘mcrapey raperson’ because of his reputation for ”harassing [women], getting on them, do you know what I mean being like, just a d***”.’ 

Home Secretary Priti Patel told the Commons Home Affairs Committee today that the problem was not isolated and there had been ‘too many instances where, in policing, we just see the most appalling behaviours’.

Asked by committee chairwoman Diana Johnson if she thinks police forces are ‘institutionally misogynistic’, Ms Patel said: ‘There are problems with the culture, and some aspects of the culture, within the Metropolitan Police.

‘I do think there are some very, very serious and significant matters that need, not just following up, but further investigation.

‘We’re not seeing one-off incidences. I think we should just be quite clear about that. We are not seeing one-off incidences, this is not isolated. We have seen now too, too many times, too many instances where, in policing, we just see the most appalling behaviours, the most appalling conduct.

‘I also think it shows a failure of leadership in some quarters.

‘So you’ve asked me the question about institutional misogyny within policing. There are cultural issues there. What we saw in the IOPC report absolutely points to, I’m not even going to say just misogynistic behaviours, I think it’s cultural and attitudinal.’

The Home Secretary said she has confidence in Metropolitan Police boss Dame Cressida Dick but ‘change is required’.

Ms Patel said: ‘I’ve always said that I’m confident in her and her work, but that also means that change is required.

‘There are lots of issues, it’s not straightforward with the Met, and there are lots of issues there where we need to see major, major significant improvements: culture, delivery, accountability and protecting the streets.’

Two inquiries are under way looking at the culture within the Met – one by Baroness Casey that was organised by the force itself, and a Home Office probe headed by Dame Elish Angiolini that is looking at the failures behind the rape and murder of Sarah Everard by a serving officer.

Shadow home secretary Yvette Cooper said the IOPC’s report had uncovered ‘truly appalling behaviour’ and urged the Home Office to address issues in policing.

She told the BBC’s Today programme: ‘Officers talking and joking about raping or beating their wives, and using homophobic insults and awful racism – you cannot ever tolerate this kind of abuse, racism or misogyny, it must have no place in policing and be rooted out.’

She called for action not just from the police, but also from the Home Office, saying there must be an overhaul of training and faster vetting of officers.

The IOPC published the messages after a series of nine investigations into the behaviour of Metropolitan Police officers based in a now disbanded Westminster team between 2016 and 2018, sparked by a later disproven claim that an officer had sex with a drunk person at a police station.

Fourteen officers were investigated by the watchdog, of whom two were found to have a case to answer for gross misconduct. One was sacked and another resigned before he would have been dismissed.

Nine remain serving officers, while another is working as a contractor in a staff role.

IOPC regional director for London Sal Naseem said that the two accused of gross misconduct were the worst perpetrators, but could not confirm whether those still serving were responsible for any of the offensive comments published.

He told Good Morning Britain: ‘What I do know is that there were nine investigations here. The two officers who were sacked for gross misconduct were the worst perpetrators of some of these exchanges.’

In response to an urgent question about the report in the Commons, policing minister Kit Malthouse said the document ‘makes for extremely disturbing reading’ and that he ‘cannot begin to describe my horror’ at the revelations it contains.

He said he will look at a request by MP Dr Matthew Offord for a new offence to be created to make it illegal for anyone in a position of trust to try to have sexual contact with someone they have met through work.

These are MailOnline mock-ups of WhatsApp conversations that were published in the IOPC report. Warning: Graphic language

These are MailOnline mock-ups of WhatsApp conversations that were published in the IOPC report. Warning: Graphic language 

A mock-up of messages sent by a male officer to a female colleague, as revealed in the IOPC investigation

A mock-up of messages sent by a male officer to a female colleague, as revealed in the IOPC investigation 

Further mock-ups of messages sent by a male officer during another shocking conversation on WhatsApp

Further mock-ups of messages sent by a male officer during another shocking conversation on WhatsApp 

The IOPC report included messages by an officer bragging about sleeping with a sex worker he had met while on duty.

The latest developments in the Met Police provoked a swift rebuke from Home Secretary Priti Patel today. 

Appearing in front of the Home Affairs Select Committee, Ms Patel said she was ‘appalled and sickened’ by the findings of yesterday’s report, blaming a ‘failure of leadership’ for the rotten culture of racism, misogyny and homophobia at Scotland Yard.

In her comments today, Ms Patel also suggested a Royal Commission could eventually be set up to explore failings across the police and wider criminal justice system. She also said spiking could be made a specific criminal offence following a series of reported incidents in nightclubs, although she warned the public ‘not to expect an announcement tomorrow’. 

Asked specifically about the report on the behaviour of officers at Charing Cross police station, she said: ‘There are problems with the culture within the Metropolitan Police. I touched on this last year after the murder of Sarah Everard, which also exposed a range of issues

‘There are some very serious and significant matters that need further investigation, primarily because we’re not seeing one-off instances. We’ve seen now too many instances of the most appalling behaviours. I also think is shows a failure of leadership in some quarters.’ 

Home Secretary Priti Patel blamed a 'failure of leadership' for the culture that has taken hold in the force - while a 'furious' Sadiq Khan called the Met Commissioner in for an urgent meeting. Pictured: London Mayor Mr Khan, Met Chief Dick and Home Secretary Ms Patel at the National Police Memorial

Home Secretary Priti Patel blamed a ‘failure of leadership’ for the culture that has taken hold in the force – while a ‘furious’ Sadiq Khan called the Met Commissioner in for an urgent meeting. Pictured: London Mayor Mr Khan, Met Chief Dick and Home Secretary Ms Patel at the National Police Memorial

Asked to clarify what she meant by this, Ms Patel said:  ‘In terms of failure of leadership, the fact that those behaviours were allowed to take place, there were no disciplinary actions, no-one saying that’s wrong, that is actually about leadership in policing. So that’s superiors, that’s seniors, line managers calling that behaviour out and actually stopping it in the first place.’ 

When chairwoman Diana Johnson asked whether that included the commissioner, Ms Patel replied: ‘It is across the board.’ 

The Home Secretary said she would continue to be ‘very challenging’ with Dame Cressida but still had confidence in her. 

A spokesperson for Sadiq Khan confirmed he had had a ‘very frank discussion’ with the commissioner earlier today ‘which lasted for well over 90 minutes’.

‘The mayor made clear to the commissioner how angry he is with a return to the bad days of the Met of his childhood in the 1970s and 80s, and that neither he nor Londoners will put up with this,’ they added.

‘He has put the commissioner on notice. He said the Met needs to urgently show it has an effective plan for restoring the trust and confidence of Londoners in the police and to drive out the culture of racism, homophobia, bullying and misogyny which clearly still exists within its ranks.’

A source close to Mr Khan also said: ‘If the commissioner is not able to do so, then the mayor will have to consider whether she is the right person to lead the change needed at the Met.’

Meanwhile, Leroy Logan, founder of the Black Police Association and a former superintendent, said ‘the rot had set in’ at the Met, which had created ‘safe havens for predators’. 

Calling for ‘ethical leadership and systemic changes’, he told the BBC’s Newsnight programme: ‘Over the last few years you’ve had Met officers doing amazingly bad things like photographing dead bodies, and then the Sarah Everard case. 

‘I was at Charing Cross from 2000 and 2004 and we never had a hint of that. Then again, we were supervisors on top of our game who had to know what was happening with our teams so we could spot these things early.

‘I think the culture has become more immoral. There seems to be safe havens for predator types – sexists, misogynists and racists that aren’t being challenged – so I’m wondering what’s happened to the inspectors and supervisors.’ 

How shattering report is latest in a string of disasters for scandal-ravaged Met chief  

Cressida Dick’s reign as Metropolitan Police commissioner has been overshadowed by controversy over bungled operations and investigations:

April 2017: Appointed as first female Metropolitan Police commissioner with a brief to modernise the force and keep it out of the headlines.

April 2019: Extinction Rebellion protesters bring London to a standstill over several days with the Met powerless to prevent the chaos. Dame Cressida says the numbers involved were far greater than expected and used new tactics but she admits police should have responded quicker.

September 2019: Her role in setting up of shambolic probe into alleged VIP child sex abuse and murder is revealed but she declines to answer questions.

2020: Official report into Operation Midland said Met was more interested in covering up mistakes than learning from them.

February 2021: Lady Brittan condemns the culture of ‘cover up and flick away’ in the Met and the lack of a moral compass among senior officers.

  • The same month a freedom of information request reveals an extraordinary spin campaign to ensure Dame Cressida was not ‘pulled into’ the scandal over the Carl Beech debacle.

March: Criticised for Met handling of a vigil for Sarah Everard, where officers arrested four attendees.

  • In the first six months of the year, London was on course for its worst year for teenage deaths – 30 – with knives being responsible for 19 out of the 22 killed so far. The youngest was 14-year-old Fares Matou, cut down with a Samurai sword. Dame Cressida had told LBC radio in May her top priority was tackling violent crime.

June: A £20million report into the Daniel Morgan murder brands the Met ‘institutionally corrupt’ and accuses her of trying to block the inquiry. Dame Cressida rejects its findings.

July: Police watchdog reveals three Met officers being probed over alleged racism and dishonesty.

  • The same month the Yard boss is at the centre of another storm after it emerged she was secretly referred to the police watchdog over comments she made about the stop and search of Team GB sprinter Bianca Williams. Dame Cressida is accused of pre-empting the outcome of an independent investigation.
  • Also in July she finds herself under fire over her woeful security operation at the Euro 2020 final at Wembley where fans without tickets stormed the stadium and others used stolen steward vests and ID lanyards to gain access.

August Dame Cressida facing a potential misconduct probe over her open support for Deputy Assistant Commissioner Matt Horne who could stand trial over alleged data breaches.

January 2022: She faces a barrage of fresh criticism for seeking to ‘muzzle’ Sue Gray’s Partygate report by asking her to make only ‘minimal’ references to parties the Met were investigating. 

February 2022: Details of messages exchanged by officers at Charing Cross Police Station, which included multiple references to rape, violence against women, racist and homophobic abuse, are unveiled in a watchdog report.


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