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Chow Chow puppy has his leg amputated after he was delivered to unsuspecting new owners

Adorable Chow Chow puppy has his leg amputated at 10 weeks old after being delivered to unsuspecting new owners wrapped in a towel by breeder who denied there was anything wrong

  • Ten-week-old Gus was purchased by owners online before being sent to Essex
  • Family had suspicions about the puppy’s health but were unable to return him
  • They were also unable to afford vet bills and gave pooch to a rehoming centre
  • Gus has since had his leg, which was deformed and ulcerated, amputated

A Chow Chow puppy was forced to have his leg amputated after he was delivered to unsuspecting new owners wrapped in a towel.

Ten-week-old Gus was purchased by his new family online before being delivered to their home in Essex earlier in December.

But the family soon had their suspicions about the puppy’s health after seeing him struggling to walk on his front paw, even though the breeder denied there was anything wrong. 

The family, who were unable to return the pooch to the breeder, were forced to hand Gus over to Dogs Trust Basildon Rehoming Centre after being unable to afford vet bills for treatment. 

He has since had his leg amputated and remains at the centre ahead of his physiotherapy treatment. 

He was delivered to his unsuspecting new owners wrapped in a towel (pictured after amputation)

Ten-week-old Chow Chow puppy Gus was forced to have his leg amputated after he was delivered to unsuspecting new owners wrapped in a towel. Pictured: Before (left) and after (right)

The family, who were unable to return the pooch to the breeder, were forced to hand Gus (pictured) over to Dogs Trust Basildon Rehoming Centre after being unable to afford vet bills for treatment

The family, who were unable to return the pooch to the breeder, were forced to hand Gus (pictured) over to Dogs Trust Basildon Rehoming Centre after being unable to afford vet bills for treatment

Lisa Cooper, who manages the Basildon centre, said: ‘Gus’s owners told us that they called the breeder who denied there was anything wrong with him, and refused to take him back, or help.

‘They took Gus to a vet who told them that the problem with his leg was so severe that it would need to be amputated or he would have to be put to sleep.

‘They couldn’t afford the unexpected veterinary care he needed, but they also couldn’t bear the alternative. 

‘That’s when they did the best thing they could do for Gus and called Dogs Trust for help.’

Basildon Rehoming Centre staff immediately took Gus to the local veterinary hospital where x-rays confirmed that his leg (pictured) was deformed and ulcerated and sadly could not be repaired

Basildon Rehoming Centre staff immediately took Gus to the local veterinary hospital where x-rays confirmed that his leg (pictured) was deformed and ulcerated and sadly could not be repaired

Basildon Rehoming Centre staff immediately took Gus to the local veterinary hospital where x-rays confirmed that his leg was deformed and ulcerated and sadly could not be repaired.

He is now recovering from his leg amputation surgery in one of the centre’s experienced foster homes and will start physiotherapy once his wound has healed. 

Gus is currently not available for rehoming.

Gus (pictured before surgery) will soon begin his physiotherapy programme once his wound has healed

Gus (pictured before surgery) will soon begin his physiotherapy programme once his wound has healed

Gus (pictured after surgery) is currently not available for rehoming but is being cared for in one of the centre's experienced foster homes while he recovers

Gus (pictured after surgery) is currently not available for rehoming but is being cared for in one of the centre’s experienced foster homes while he recovers

Owen Sharp, Dogs Trust CEO, said: ‘Thanks to the phenomenal support we’ve had from supporters throughout this pandemic, we are able to ‘Change the Tale’ for Gus.

‘I met Gus at Basildon a few days ago and saw first-hand the incredible care that he is getting. His story is a perfect example of what our amazing teams across the country do every day.

‘If people have taken on a puppy and are struggling, please contact us here at Dogs Trust. You can call us on 0300 303 2188.

‘We won’t judge, we just want to help.’

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