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Close call! Terrifying moment a huge python lunges at zookeeper’s face as she protects her eggs

Close call! Terrifying moment a huge python lunges at zookeeper’s face as she protects her eggs

  • Jay Brewer, who owns The Reptile Zoo in California, grappled with the python
  • He was attempting to remove rotten eggs from her nest to save healthy babies 
  • Snake lunged at him but he managed to avoid being bitten by the predator 

Terrifying footage has captured the moment a giant python lunges at a zookeeper when he tries to remove rotten eggs from underneath her. 

Jay Brewer, who owns The Reptile Zoo in Fountain Valley, California, posted the video to Instagram after he underwent the frightening experience to save the ‘few good eggs’ the snake had left.

Footage shows the python striking at the zookeeper as he keeps a safe distance, while admitting he ‘doesn’t normally get nervous, but he is now.’

As he moves closer in an attempt to retrieve the rotten eggs, the snake lunges, but Mr Brewer is able to quickly dive out of the way. 

Jay Brewer (seen with the snake), who owns The Reptile Zoo in Fountain Valley, California, posted the video to Instagram

He says: ‘She is literally waiting for me to get into the exact position that she thinks she can reach.’

But when the zookeeper continues talking, the snake strikes again, forcing Mr Brewer to jump to the side to avoid a bite.

He adds: ‘I took my guard down for one second and she took advantage of that one second. When I say this is a grumpy snake, I’m not kidding.’

Pythons are non-venomous snakes native to Africa, Asia, and Australia. 

They are largely ambush predators, laying motionless in a camouflaged position before suddenly striking at passing prey.

Pictured: The scene

Pictured: The scene

Footage shows the python striking at the zookeeper as he keeps a safe distance, while admitting he ‘doesn’t normally get nervous, but he is now’

As the clip continues, Mr Brewer is able to move the snake to one side so his daughter can take the rotten eggs away from the snake’s nest.

He explained that if they don’t remove those that have gone bad, there’s an ‘almost 100 per cent chance’ they will ‘get maggots, rot and all the eggs will die.’

The video comes to a close as Mr Brewer returns the snake to her enclosure.

In the caption, he said: ‘When I say this snake is grumpy… I mean she’s grumpy!

‘This is one of the craziest clutches I’ve pulled in a long time. She doesn’t know I’m just trying to save the few good eggs she has.

‘Without removing them even the good ones would have rotted.

‘That is why I’m willing to take the risk to save the babies’.

The Reptile Zoo allows visitors to view hundreds of reptile exhibits displaying snakes, lizards, frogs, and tortoises from around the world.

Guests are also able to interact with the Ball Python, Bearded Dragon, Sulcata Tortoise and Leopard Gecko.           

Non-venomous snakes that can grow to 33ft in length: What you need to know about pythons

Pythons are non-venomous snakes native to Africa, Asia, and Australia. 

They are largely ambush predators, laying motionless in a camouflaged position before suddenly striking at passing prey.

Pythons are some of the largest snakes in the world, ranging from 23 inches to 33ft in length, and weighing from seven ounces to 250lbs.

They can live in a range of habitats, but many seek shelter in trees as they can cling onto branches with their tails.  

Female pythons lay eggs to reproduce – anywhere from two to 100 at a time, depending on the species. 

They kill their prey by constriction, with larger species usually eating animals about the size of a house cat, but they have been known to bring down adult deer. 

The African rock python has been known to eat antelope. 

All prey is swallowed whole, and may take several days or even weeks to fully digest. 

Source: San Diego Zoo 

 

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