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Cornish farmer, 76, becomes a viral sensation thanks to his VERY thick accent

‘Eed a zoo nah yah’: Cornish farmer, 76, becomes a viral sensation thanks to his VERY thick accent that ‘no one can understand’

  • Tom Warne has found fame for his very thick accent ‘no one’ can understand 
  • Farmer, 76, has been filmed for TikTok by his 18-year-old granddaughter Maria 
  • In one clip where he feeds cow, words sound like ‘eed a zoo nah yah’ but Maria confirmed he is saying ‘feeding time at the zoo’ 

A 76-year-old farmer from Cornwall has become an unlikely social media star after his granddaughter filmed him speaking in a his very thick West Country accent. 

Maria Warne, 18, shared videos of her ‘granfer’ Tom at his farm in north Cornwall, and she has even begun taking requests form her 850,000 followers for things for him to say.

In a series of videos posted to TikTok, Tom mumbles and bumbles his way through conversation which is incomprehensible to most. 

In a series of videos posted to TikTok , Tom mumbles and bumbles his way through conversation which is incomprehensible to most.

A 76-year-old farmer from Cornwall has become an unlikely social media star after his granddaughter filmed him speaking in a his very thick West Country accent.

Maria Warne, 18, shared videos of her 'granfer' Tom at his farm in north Cornwall, and she has even begun taking requests form her 850,000 followers for things for him to say.

Maria Warne, 18, shared videos of her ‘granfer’ Tom at his farm in north Cornwall, and she has even begun taking requests form her 850,000 followers for things for him to say.

One video shows him feeding cows, with Maria revealing he saying: ‘Feeding time at the zoo, now you yes, coming now. Them not chimps, them bleeding bullocks, great hellers. 

‘There’s one now come, he’s the last one, he don’t want no supper. One there now b******* around with the gate!’

In another, he explains what a Hereford cow is and in a third he says ‘what’s cooking good looking’ at the request of a fan.

Others have compared him to Harry Potter’s Hagrid and asked him to say ‘Yer a Wizard Harry,’ as Robbie Coltrane famously does in Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s  Stone. 

One video shows him feeding cows, with Maria revealing he saying: 'Feeding time at the zoo, now you yes, coming now. Them not chimps, them bleeding bullocks, great hellers.

Despite being clueless to what he's saying, fans have flocked to the comments of the videos. Maris is pictured

One video shows him feeding cows, with Maria revealing he saying: ‘Feeding time at the zoo, now you yes, coming now. Them not chimps, them bleeding bullocks, great hellers.

Despite being clueless to what he’s saying, fans have flocked to the comments of the videos.

‘I couldn’t understand a word and I love it’, said one.

 ‘Could someone translate this from farmer to English please?’ added another.

‘I can’t understand a single word, but I believe him,’ one said.

‘My man only speaks in vowels’ said another.

‘I’ve lived in Cornwall almost my whole life and this is possibly the most Cornish-sounding man I have ever heard,’ someone else added.  

Speaking to CornwallLive earlier this year, Maria described her grandfather as a ‘true Cornish gem’.   

‘Ever since we were young we have had to translate to every house guest! Him and my Gran are our family’s biggest inspiration and we treasure every moment.’

‘He could teach any Devonshire lad or lass the proper way to put jam and cream on a scone!’ 

A glossary of Cornish phrases 

Dreckly – Used as a non-specific answer to a question about when something will be done, or when someone will arrive.

Wasson? – A general greeting that is essentially a shorter version of ‘what’s going on?’

Born in a barn? – Used to encourage someone to close the door when a cold draft is let in.

Dearovim – Used to express regret at a situation, or a person’s luck, or admire their efforts, similar to ‘bless their heart’.

Scat – A threat to knock down something, or someone, aggressively.

Shag – An affectionate terms for a friend or acquaintance.

Some maid – A term of endearment when referring to someone female.

Fercrisaeik, ellydoinov – Used to express disbelief at something, essentially to mean ‘what on earth were you thinking?’

‘E’s teasy as’n’adder – A warning to keep your distance from someone in a bad mood.

Rufarzrats – Used to express feeling worse for wear, usually after drinking.

Giss on! – Used to express disbelief at a situation, similar to ‘are you pulling my leg?’

Piddledowndidda – A way of asking how much rain has fallen.

 

 

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