UK

Furious travellers say they’d rather stay with family abroad than return to the UK over quarantine

Furious travellers have hit out at the government’s new quarantine plan for arrivals coming into the UK. 

Under the new rules, people arriving in Britain from 22 countries on the so-called  ‘Red List’ will have to quarantine in government selected hotels for 10 days.

Portugal is the only European country on the list, though there are fears it could be extended with Home Secretary Priti Patel thought to favour closing borders to new arrivals completely.   

If the ban is extended, only British and Irish nationals, long-term visa holders and residents will be able to enter the country, though they’ll then have to immediately quarantine at hotels. 

However, travellers at London’s St Pancras station headed to France hit out at the rules today and claimed they would not come back to Britain if they have to quarantine. 

France isn’t on the list but Ms Patel singled out Britons travelling to Paris from St Pancras to ski in a fiery speech yesterday.   

Jules Coles, 22, from Hampstead, north London, who was travelling to see his family near Paris and will be returning next week, says having to stay in a hotel is a ‘sticking point’

Charlotte, 23, is visiting her family in France. She said she won't be returning to the UK if she has to isolate in a hotel

Charlotte, 23, is visiting her family in France. She said she won’t be returning to the UK if she has to isolate in a hotel

Pablod Villacampo, 19, in his second year of biochemistry studies, is going to visit his father in Lyon, and will not be coming back if travel regulations get any stricter

Pablod Villacampo, 19, in his second year of biochemistry studies, is going to visit his father in Lyon, and will not be coming back if travel regulations get any stricter

Charlotte, 23, who has lived in the UK for 10 years and is studying Art Law, travels to France regularly to visit her family.

Charlotte said: ‘Well I won’t be coming back if there’s the 10 day hotel quarantine.

‘It’s too expensive. I’d be happy to declare why I’m travelling but I wouldn’t travel if I had to stay in a hotel.

‘It’s the financial thing. To be fair I wouldn’t travel anywhere during lockdown, it’s just my parents live in Paris.

‘I think the 10 days works in places like Australia and islands like Guernsey, but not here. It’s good for those who can make the effort because the travel industry can get an income from it.’ 

Jules Coles, 22, from Hampstead, north London, who was travelling to see his family near Paris and will be returning next week, said: ‘To be honest, it should have happened before I believe.

‘The way it is, self-isolation at home, I think most people do it. I know that most people travelling to England from France do it.

‘I don’t know if people travelling from abroad do it, but definitely most people from France so I wouldn’t go as far as asking people to stay in a hotel.

‘As it stands, having to come home and you know self-isolate for 10 days, that’s fine.

‘Now you have to have a negative PCR test as well, which is absolutely fair. But the sticking point is the hotel part, that’s fine if you’re travelling from Australia or wherever.

‘But you have to pay for the yourself, which is a bit of a problem. Of course the government didn’t respond particularly well, but what can we do, we’ve got the vaccines coming.

Annette Hultzsch, 49, a fashion designer living in Hackney who was visiting Paris for work, said: 'I want to say it's a f***ing joke'

Annette Hultzsch, 49, a fashion designer living in Hackney who was visiting Paris for work, said: ‘I want to say it’s a f***ing joke’

France isn't on the list but Ms Patel singled out Britons travelling to Paris from St Pancras to ski in a fiery speech yesterday

France isn’t on the list but Ms Patel singled out Britons travelling to Paris from St Pancras to ski in a fiery speech yesterday

‘If the hotels were used for European travel, I think that would be step to far.’ 

Annette Hultzsch, 49, a fashion designer living in Hackney who was visiting Paris for work, said: ‘I want to say it’s a f***ing joke.

‘For one year they haven’t done anything and obviously you have to do something, I agree, but they should have done it last year.

‘Still wearing a mask in this country is not enforced anywhere, it’s a total disaster.

‘If they ask me to stay in a hotel and sign a form, I would have to make a decision between this and losing my job.

‘I would probably stay in Paris for longer, but yes, I would be risking my job.’

Boglette Koabo, 40, from Luton, was also travelling to Paris for work and says 10 days in a hotel is ‘too much’ and ‘who’s going to pay for it?’

Ms Koabo said: ‘If the 10 days applied to Europe, then excuse me, I work.

‘If I go to Paris for two days and then come back and on the Monday I’ve got work.

‘If you’re telling me I have to stay in a hotel for 10 days, what kind of sense is that?

‘And if I have to stay in a hotel, who’s going to pay for that, I’m not going to pay for that!

At Heathrow terminal 5 this morning, people were generally accepting of the new restrictions and information that they now have to give to the authorities

At Heathrow terminal 5 this morning, people were generally accepting of the new restrictions and information that they now have to give to the authorities

Portugal is the only European country on the list, though there are fears it could be extended with Home Secretary Priti Patel thought to favour closing borders to new arrivals completely

Portugal is the only European country on the list, though there are fears it could be extended with Home Secretary Priti Patel thought to favour closing borders to new arrivals completely

‘Who is going to pay for the meals and all that? There are too many rules, it’s unbelievable and it’s just mad.

‘I’m only going today and coming back on Saturday, and still, I have to do a test and as soon as I get to Paris I have to do another test to come back.

‘It’s too much, and everything is too much.

‘Can you imagine if I don’t have time to get a test in Paris? That means they are going to charge me 140 euros. It’s a lot.’

If travel is restricted further some Eurostar users say they simply won’t come back.

Pablod Villacampo, 19, in his second year of biochemistry studies, was going to visit his father in Lyon, and will not be coming back if travel regulations get any stricter.

Fines for holidays with police checking your passport at the airport 

How can the Government stop Britons from going on holiday?

Lockdown rules already ban people from international travel unless it is for work. Leaving home is only permitted for a small number of reasons. 

Under the lockdown laws introduced at the start of January and which will run until March 31, people in England are allowed only to leave the house for a very slim range of activities. 

But the rules, which are largely the same as for the second lockdown in November, also ban foreign leisure travel, just as they prohibit domestic leisure travel.

What happens if I want to travel abroad?

People wanting to leave the UK will have to fill out a form giving the reason for their trip. 

Anyone who turns up at ports and airports without a valid reason for travel will be directed to return home and may face a fine. 

Priti Patel said today: ‘Going on holiday is not a valid reason, so we will introduce a new requirement so that people wishing to travel must first make a declaration as to why they need to travel.

‘This reason for travel will be checked by carriers prior to departure.’

Travel operators are also expected to face fines if they fail to inspect these forms. 

What will I have to prove if I went to travel? 

Work trips are allowed, so you will have to show some proof that your flight or sea crossing is vital for your employment.

However, there are a range of other reasons for ‘essential travel.

These are the same at the reasons for leaving your house: medical care, to escape harm, compassionate visits –  for example a funeral – and weddings. 

The list of travel exemptions will be urgently reviewed so that only the most important and exceptional reasons are included. 

Who is going to enforce these rules?

It is not clear whether airlines and other travel operators will have the unilateral ability to decide whether someone has given a genuine reason for a trip on their forms, or it will end up being referred to police. There will also be an increased police presence at ports and airports, fining those in breach of the stay at home regulations. 

Why is this being highlighted now?

The Home Secretary lashed out at social media influencers who have been posting images of themselves in sunny parts of the world like Dubai during the lockdown. 

Many have claimed they were travelling for work, but have attracted a backlash from people stuck at home after also enjoying the nightlife and beaches. 

Ms Patel also singled out people ‘turning up with their skis’ at London’s St Pancras station to catch the Eurostar to European resorts, adding: ‘That is clearly not acceptable.’ 

 

Mr Villacampo said: ‘It doesn’t affect me too much because I probably won’t be coming back, and I definitely won’t be coming back if I have to stay in a hotel.

‘I’m a student, and just look how London is right now, the response is pretty embarrassing.

‘I’m pretty disappointed as a University student by my whole experience here.

‘I won’t be coming back if I have to stay in a hotel for 10 days.

‘I’m just getting all these different stories from the government, whether it’s like an £800 fine for parties over 15. There shouldn’t be any parties to begin with.

‘It shows deficiencies and how incompetent the government response has been.’   

At Heathrow terminal 5 this morning, people were generally accepting of the new restrictions and information that they now have to give to the authorities.

Terence Peters, 58, from Catford, south east London, is flying on his own to Miami after his mother died.

Mr Peters, who works in construction, is staying with family in Florida for three weeks and knows he will have to quarantine when he gets back but hopes not to end up in a hotel.

He said: ‘I have no problem with these new plans, if it stops people from living it up and going on holiday then I think it’s a good thing.

‘It doesn’t bother me too much to let the Government now where I’m going and what the reason is.’

Marcus Ulf, a 41-year-old Swedish diplomat who is relocating back to Stockholm with his wife Liang, 39, and children Elias, 3, August, 1, said he felt the new requirements were far more stringent than in Sweden.

‘I think it does seem a little excessive compared to Sweden however this is a very serious situation and thousands of people are dying so what choice do the government have?

‘The virus is spreading in Sweden too but perhaps the problem is a little worse in the UK so I can understand why they need to take a tough approach.

‘People are getting used to wading through red tape when they get to airports and this is just a little bit extra.’

Humza Hussain, from Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, is flying to university in Germany because he is studying there.

As he waited at the airport testing centre, the 20-year-old said: ‘I’d rather not fill out all these forms because it is a little invasive into my private life, however I completely understand why the Government are doing this.

‘We have seen countries where the restrictions have been much aggressive and they have suffered far fewer deaths.

‘We recently passed the 100,000 mark so if filling out a form, however irritating, means that I help to save a life or help the authorities get a grip on the coronavirus than I am of course more than willing to do so.’

Sri Much and his wife Shalu, from Basildon in Essex are going to Hyderabad, southern Indian abroad with their sons Avan, 5 months and Anvit, aged 3.

He said: ‘Personally I have no issue with filling out the forms because I think we should be restricting the amount of trouble that is going on at the moment.

‘Far too many people have been going on holiday and at this particular time during the pandemic that is wrong.

‘We are travelling to India due to a family emergency – my grandmother has a problem with her kidneys which is very serious and we don’t think she is going to survive it. Her wish is to meet my youngest son, her great grandson who was born last year, before she passes away.’   

Priti Patel was facing a furious backlash from Tory MPs and airlines today over her ‘shambolic’ holiday ban announcement amid fears it will leave airport staff facing the full anger of travellers.

They accused the Home Secretary of launching a broadside at Instagram influencers and holidaymakers after being ‘humiliated’ over her attempts to close the UK border completely to foreign arrivals. 

She read the riot act to would-be travellers last, warning that people on fake work jaunts and social media attention-seekers heading for sunny destinations will be turned away from airports.

But foreign travel – apart from some exceptions – has been illegal since the lockdown law was passed on January 5. There was  also confusion today over what would constitute an acceptable journey abroad and who would police the policy.

Michel Gove added to the anger this morning by suggesting people might not be allowed to go abroad even for legitimate work trips

Michel Gove added to the anger this morning by suggesting people might not be allowed to go abroad even for legitimate work trips

One angry airline source told MailOnline enforcing the restrictions would ‘present challenges’ amid fears check-in staff will be told to make judgements on what constitutes a legitimate journey. 

Michel Gove added to the anger this morning by suggesting people might not be allowed to go abroad even for legitimate work trips. 

The senior Cabinet minister said that there needed to be a ‘powerful business reason’ to leave the UK and that such journeys would be reviewed on a ‘case-by-‘case basis. 

A senior Tory MP told MailOnline that Ms Patel had obviously been ‘humiliated’ over the decision to apply hotel quarantine only to arrivals from 30 ‘red list’ nations, instead of all arrivals.

They said she was just trying to ‘save face’ with the enforcement crackdown, adding:  ‘Priti has always been tough talking. There is an element of more mouth than substance. 

‘Clearly the view in Downing Street has been to target the countries already on the red list… what she is doing now is face saving.

The Tory MP added: ‘This is a public humiliation … politics isn’t all about tough talking, it’s about delivery as well. 

‘I’ve been in meeting where she is just isolated. She just doesn’t get the mood of the meeting, and then she will leave calling everyone ”effing useless” because we haven’t agreed with her.’  

The Home Secretary heralded a huge squeeze on ‘non-essential’ journeys last night as she revealed that even during lockdown individuals have been flouting the rules – including by turning up to go abroad carrying skis. 

In a statement to MPs, she said such people now face being sent home again, and will have to fill out a legal declaration saying that they are going for essential purposes.

‘Going on holiday is not a valid reason to travel,’ she swiped.

Allies of of the Home Secretary today insisted the Cabinet had been ‘evenly split’ over whether to impose tougher quarantine rules. Responding to the criticism of her handling, one source said: ‘There have always been some MPs who think you should throw open our nations borders. They can moan all they like, but that is not going to stop her taking the tough decisions needed to protect our nation and stop people needlessly dying.’ 

It was believed that business travel  would be permitted, under rules that allow people to go to work in the UK if they are unable to work from home. But Mr Gove contradicted that today.

The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster also warned couples with foreign weddings they would have to cancel or rearrange them for some other time. But in the same BBC interview he confirmed that ‘natural human sympathy’ would be shown to people needing to go abroad on ‘compassionate’ grounds.

What is a ‘valid reason’ to leave the UK, what forms do I need to fill in and what is happening with quarantine hotels? Vital Q&A on latest foreign travel rules 

By James Gant for MailOnline

Lockdown-weary Britons are dreaming of being on an exotic beach or taking a city break on the Continent to escape the daily grim Covid news in the UK.

But taking a trip away in the next few months is going to be tricky, with travellers needing to have a ‘valid reason’ to leave their homes.

Only today Home Secretary Priti Patel warned those trying to leave country on fake work jaunts they will be turned back at airports.

Meanwhile Boris Johnson said legitimate travellers returning from ‘red list’ countries will be sent to quarantine hotels for 10 days.

The limited Australian-style quarantine scheme follows concerns about new Covid variants entering Britain.

Confusingly, Boris Johnson told the House of Commons earlier 22 countries will be on the quarantine list.

But the current ‘red list’ of countries from where only British nationals can come to the UK is much wider than that.

Here, MailOnline answers some of the key questions on the latest foreign travel rules that would-be passengers need to know:

A man is pictured pushing his luggage at Heathrow airport in west London on Wednesday

A man is pictured pushing his luggage at Heathrow airport in west London on Wednesday

For what reason can I travel to another country?

You can only travel internationally when you have a legally permitted reason to leave home.

People are also advised to consider the public health advice in the country they are visiting before they go.

Anyone who does not have a valid reason for travel will be directed to return home and may face a fine as their reason for travel will be checked.

The Home Office said there will be an increased police presence at ports and airports fining those in breach of the stay at home regulations.

Priti Patel said: ‘Going on holiday is not a valid reason, so we will introduce a new requirement so that people wishing to travel must first make a declaration as to why they need to travel.

‘This reason for travel will be checked by carriers prior to departure.’ Travel operators are also expected to face fines if they fail to inspect these forms.

How can the Government stop Britons from going on holiday?

Lockdown rules already ban people from international travel unless it is for work. Leaving home is only permitted for a small number of reasons. 

Under the lockdown laws introduced at the start of January and which will run until March 31, people in England are allowed only to leave the house for a very slim range of activities.

But the rules, which are largely the same as for the second lockdown in November, also ban foreign leisure travel, just as they prohibit domestic leisure travel.

These are the daily average of cases per million people in the countries on the UK quarantine list

These are the daily average of cases per million people in the countries on the UK quarantine list

Who is going to enforce these rules?

It is not clear whether airlines and other travel operators will have the unilateral ability to decide whether someone has given a genuine reason for a trip on their forms, or it will end up being referred to police.

There will also be an increased police presence at ports and airports, fining those in breach of the stay at home regulations.

Why is this being highlighted now?

The Home Secretary lashed out at social media influencers who have been posting images of themselves in sunny parts of the world like Dubai during the lockdown.

Many have claimed they were travelling for work, but have attracted a backlash from people stuck at home after also enjoying the nightlife and beaches. 

Ms Patel also singled out people ‘turning up with their skis’ at London’s St Pancras station to catch the Eurostar to European resorts, adding: ‘That is clearly not acceptable.’

What does the hotel quarantine mean for arrivals in the UK?

Priti Patel said Britons returning from around 30 ‘red list’ Covid countries will be forced to quarantine in hotels for 10 days at their own expense.

Hundreds of arrivals each day are expected to be escorted directly from airports to rooms.

They will have to stay there for the duration of their isolation and pay a bill estimated at £1,500.

It will only affect British travellers, as foreign citizens who have been in the countries are already banned from entering altogether. It has not kicked in yet.

What places require a ten-day quarantine in a hotel after?

  • Angola
  • Argentina
  • Bolivia
  • Botswana
  • Brazil
  • Cape Verde
  • Chile
  • Colombia
  • Democratic Republic of Congo
  • Ecuador
  • Eswatini
  • French Guiana
  • Guyana
  • Lesotho
  • Malawi
  • Mauritius
  • Mozambique
  • Namibia
  • Panama
  • Paraguay
  • Peru
  • Portugal (including Madeira and the Azores)
  • Seychelles
  • South Africa
  • Suriname
  • Tanzania
  • Uruguay
  • Venezuela
  • Zambia
  • Zimbabwe

What will happen on arrival at the hotel?

Travellers who face enforced quarantine will be taken by bus to a hotel where they will have to remain for ten days.

Officials have begun talks with hotel groups about block-booking rooms that can be used for isolating.

In Australia, people are required to stay in their room the entire time with security guards patrolling the corridors. Hotel staff are forbidden from cleaning the rooms during a person’s stay.

Can you upgrade your hotel?

Travellers will not get a choice of hotel, meaning it does not matter if you paid for a more expensive trip away.

In Australia, people do not know in advance where they will be staying and are warned there is no guarantee of access to a balcony or open window.

What are you supposed to do all day?

In Australia, exercise outside is not allowed so guests are encouraged to do stretches or yoga in their room. 

A guide given to travellers to help prepare for hotel isolation suggests planning different activities to break up the day.

Examples given include getting in contact with different friends and family, learning a foreign language on a mobile phone app, trying out a new hobby such as knitting and calligraphy, and catching up on ‘life admin’.

The advice recommends planning ‘rewards’ to look forward to such as a phone call with a loved one or the delivery of a treat.

People sharing rooms with partners and family members are encouraged to set ground rules for the stays such as scheduling a time each day when everyone does a ‘quiet’ activity to help avoid disagreements.

Last summer an outbreak of coronavirus in Melbourne was blamed on security guards having sex with guests at one of the quarantine hotels.

Mr Johnson is expected to sign off on plans this evening to divert travellers entering the UK from high-risk Covid countries into hotels to stop new mutant strains of coronavirus like the ones from Brazil and South Africa entering the UK.

Mr Johnson is expected to sign off on plans this evening to divert travellers entering the UK from high-risk Covid countries into hotels to stop new mutant strains of coronavirus like the ones from Brazil and South Africa entering the UK.

Who pays the hotel bill?

The Government will arrange transport for travellers to their accommodation, but they will have to cover the cost of their hotel room, estimated to be about £1,500.

The cost of 14 days in a quarantine hotel is £1,692 for an adult in Australia, £1,630 in New Zealand and £642 in Thailand.

What if I am a Brit abroad now?

UK residents currently abroad do not need to return home immediately. But you should check with your airline or travel operator on arrangements for returning.

What should foreign nationals in the UK do to get home?

Foreign nationals are subject to the ‘Stay at Home’ regulations. You should not travel abroad unless it is permitted. This means you must not go on holiday.

If you are visiting the UK, you may return home. You should check whether there are any restrictions in place at your destination.

What do I need on return to the UK?

Passengers arriving in the UK need to provide evidence of a negative pre-departure Covid test.

People arriving from abroad also have to self-isolate on arrival and they have to complete a passenger locator form, with fines for those who do not.

What is a passenger locator form?

Earlier this month the government announced passengers had to complete online passenger locator forms to tell officials where they are staying after arriving in the UK.

It has to have the person’s address on it where they will isolate for ten days or five days if they take another test which comes back negative. 

Coming back to the UK without a locator form will result in a £1,000 fine.

What do I need for a passenger locator form?

You will need: your passport details, Your travel details, including times and dates, the address where you will stay in the UK (if applicable), a booking reference number and the name of the test provider, if you’re using Test to Release to find out if you can end self-isolation early.

You can include multiple journeys in your form if you’ll enter the UK more than once in a 48-hour period.

Where can I get one?

Passenger locator forms are available to download from gov.uk here.

What happens then?

After you complete the form you will receive a QR code via email. You can print this out or show it on your phone as proof of completion.

What if you are travelling with other people?

Each adult must complete their own form. You can include someone under 18 years old who is travelling with you on your form, if you are staying together at the same UK address. If you’re entering Scotland, they must be under 16.

When do you not need to fill one out?

If you are travelling from Ireland, the Channel Islands or the Isle of Man and were there for more than ten days.

Passenger locator forms are available to download from the UK government website

Passenger locator forms are available to download from the UK government website

Do any jobs qualify for travel exemptions?

Yes, if you do one of the following you may qualify for an exemption from one or more of the travel restrictions.

  • Aerospace engineers
  • Aircraft pilots and crew
  • BBC broadcasting transmission network and services
  • Border security duties – UK officials and contractors
  • Border security duties – non-UK officials and contractors
  • Bus and coach drivers
  • Channel Tunnel system workers
  • Civil aviation inspectors
  • Clinical trials or studies
  • Crown servants or government contractors
  • Data infrastructure maintenance
  • Defence personnel, visiting forces and government contractors
  • Diplomatic missions, international organisations and conferences
  • Downstream oil facility workers
  • Drivers of goods vehicles
  • Electronic communications networks
  • Elite sportsmen – international
  • Elite sportsmen – domestic
  • Medical examinations for elite sportsmen
  • Environment Agency relating to flood and coastal erosion risk management
  • Eurostar International workers
  • Eurotunnel workers
  • Government contractors – the conduct of negotiations
  • High-speed rail workers 
  • International prison escorts
  • IT and telecoms workers
  • Medical evacuation
  • Medical treatment
  • Urgent medical treatment
  • Medicines – human and veterinary
  • Network Rail workers
  • Nuclear personnel
  • Nuclear emergency responder
  • Offshore oil and gas workers
  • OPCW and IAEA inspectors
  • Postal workers
  • Quality assurance inspectors for human and veterinary medicines
  • Registered health or care professionals
  • Regular work abroad
  • Regular work in the UK, living abroad
  • Representatives of a foreign country or territory or British overseas territories
  • Seamen and masters and inspectors and surveyors of ships
  • Seasonal agricultural workers
  • Seasonal poultry workers
  • Specialist technical workers – sub-sea telecommunications infrastructure
  • Specialist technical workers – goods and services
  • Specialist technical workers – waste 
  • Specialist technical workers – power infrastructure
  • Specialist technical workers – space infrastructure
  • Transiting airside through the UK
  • Transporting human cells or blood
  • Water supplies and sewerage services workers

For more information visit gov.uk

What about the so-called vaccine passports?

At least eight companies have been awarded government grants to develop vaccination passport schemes, it was reported earlier this week.

The projects, worth a total of £450,000, could allow users to securely carry digital proof that they have received an approved Covid-19 vaccine.

It is hoped such a scheme would help get people back to work and also allow for the reopening of international travel.

The government on Sunday denied such a scheme was being considered, and cabinet minister Michael Gove said they were ‘not the plan’.

But ministers have contradicted each other on the issue, including Boris Johnson’s vaccine tsar Nadhim Zahawi who said they were ‘looking at the technology’.

The scheme is being considered by many countries, including Cyprus and the Seychelles, who hope their use would open up society for people who have received a jab.

EU officials have demanded vaccines made in the UK be exported to Europe to help plug shortfalls in its own jabs roll-out, which is among the slowest in the world

EU officials have demanded vaccines made in the UK be exported to Europe to help plug shortfalls in its own jabs roll-out, which is among the slowest in the world

Should I book a holiday abroad this spring?

There are two factors to consider. The first is whether concern over new strains of coronavirus will lift enough to allow quarantine-free travel – and if you can afford to come back to ten days in isolation.

The second is where can you go. It is not clear what destinations will be open to Britons, where the virus is still a major problem. 

What about in the summer?

Ministers have warned in recent days that it is ‘too early’ to speculate around future holiday plans.

But Health Secretary Matt Hancock has previously said: ‘I think we’re going to have a great British summer.’ Whether he meant a great summer at home in the UK or abroad is unclear.

A deserted Levante beach in Benidorm today as the Government urged Britons not to book summer holidays in yet another blow for struggling airlines and holiday companies

A deserted Levante beach in Benidorm today as the Government urged Britons not to book summer holidays in yet another blow for struggling airlines and holiday companies

What about ski season?

Most resorts have already cancelled the ski season in February, with Inghams, Ski Total, Esprit Ski and Flexiski among those to halt bookings until after the 27th.

Some are open with the hope government rules will change after the school half term.

How about a staycation in Britain this summer?

It is hoped restrictions will have given way enough by July for people to stay somewhere in the UK.

A surge in bookings for resorts, hotels and self-catered accommodation is anticipated.

Center Parcs, Haven and Butlins have all hiked their prices for Easter as they plan to reopen in March despite concerns that the national lockdown will still be in place.

Are lorry drivers bringing trade facing the same measures?

Hauliers are exempt from quarantine to keep trade flowing across the border.

What do airlines say?

Airline bosses have demanded that the Government provides an ‘urgent road map for the reopening of air travel’.

What do public health experts say?

Linda Bauld, professor of public health at the University of Edinburgh, said quarantine hotels are ‘absolutely essential’ and suggested the lack of quarantine measures earlier in the pandemic had been ‘a major factor’ in contributing to the current situation.

When will this all end?

The government says the list of travel exemptions will be urgently reviewed so only the most important and exceptional reasons are includedThe law under which the holiday ban falls lasts until March 31, unless it is renewed. It is reviewed every two weeks.


Source link

Related Articles

Back to top button