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Graduate who was battling Covid woke from nine-day coma to find NHS staff had delivered her baby

Heavily-pregnant university graduate, 22, who was battling Covid woke from nine-day coma to find NHS staff had delivered her baby daughter

  • Mehpara Naqvi was seven months pregnant when she was rushed to hospital
  • 22-year-old developed Covid symptoms in October before struggling to breathe 
  • Medics performed a C-section, during which Ms Naqvi’s oxygen levels dropped
  • She is now reunited with baby and making a recovery after waking from coma

A heavily-pregnant university graduate who was battling Covid-19 woke from a nine-day coma to find that NHS staff had delivered her baby daughter. 

Mehpara Naqvi, 22, was seven months pregnant when she was rushed to Bradford Royal Infirmary, West Yorkshire, in October after suffering from breathing difficulties.

She had developed coronavirus symptoms, including a cough, headache and loss of taste and smell, before her condition rapidly worsened within the next few days.

Ms Naqvi was placed in the intensive care ward on her first night in the hospital and was told by the maternal critical care lead, Debbie Horner, that her baby may have to be delivered via Caesarean section and kept in an incubator.

Mehpara Naqvi (pictured with her baby), 22, was heavily pregnant when she was rushed to Bradford Royal Infirmary, West Yorkshire, in October after suffering from breathing difficulties

As her condition deteriorated, concerns were raised over the baby’s oxygen needs placing additional strain on Ms Naqvi’s lungs, and medics decided to perform the C-section.

However, the graduate’s blood oxygen levels dropped dramatically low as she was taken to the operating theatre and staff chose to carry out the operation while placing her under general anaesthetic.

While she was under the anaesthetic, her oxygen levels dipped even lower but medics still managed to deliver her baby, Noor, before placing Ms Naqvi back in intensive care in an induced coma.

The mother, who attended Bedfordshire University, told the BBC: ‘I was on the ventilator for nine days, I think. I didn’t know I’d given birth, I didn’t know anything.’

Ms Naqvi was told by the maternal critical care lead, Debbie Horner (pictured above), that her baby may have to be delivered via Caesarean section and kept in an incubator

Ms Naqvi was told by the maternal critical care lead, Debbie Horner (pictured above), that her baby may have to be delivered via Caesarean section and kept in an incubator

She was released from the hospital on November 3 with Noor, who was born weighing 3lb 5oz (1.5kg).

The pair were reunited after Ms Naqvi awoke from her coma and was transferred to the woman and newborn unit.

She said: ‘I could touch her and see her – I couldn’t believe that she was actually alive, and that she was well.’

Ms Naqvi is still getting to grips with going on long walks and sometimes suffers from breathlessness, but is making a steady recovery.

Ms Horner added: ‘I’m really pleased that things worked out for them, actually, because it was a really difficult case, and it was stressful for everyone.’

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