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Kate Middleton and Prince William give glimpse into Anmer Hall’s £1.5 million renovation

Kate Middleton’s virtual video calls show how she is able to inject her ‘contemporary classic’ style into every space she inhabits, interior design experts have revealed. 

In recent months the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have taken part in video calls and sent recorded messages from their home at Kensington Palace and at the Queen’s home of Sandringham, in Norfolk, where they set up a temporary office while living at nearby Anmer Hall over lockdown. 

There are striking similarities between the two spaces, revealing how Kate Middleton is able to bring her personal design flair and sense of ‘calm’ and ‘harmony’ to every home office. The couple also brought their favourite family photos between London and Norfolk, creating a sense of unity between the two spaces. 

Yesterday Kate and William offered another glimpse of Apartment 1A at Kensington Palace, where they live with Prince George, seven, Princess Charlotte, five, and Prince Louis, two, when they shared a video message for a mental health campaign.  

Analysing the spaces exclusively to FEMAIL, Deirdre Mc Gettrick, Founder and CEO of ufurnish.com, commented: ‘Colours can evoke different feelings or emotions and historically, primary colours such as rich reds, deep blues and dark greens would have coloured the walls. 

Deirdre explained that the royal couple have delicately embraced the regal heritage of their property by adding a touch of red into their cushions. Pictured, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge during a message recorded at Kensington Palace this week

Deirdre Mc Gettrick, Founder and CEO of ufurnish.com explained Prince William and Kate Middleton have opted for a muted neutral tone of earthy cream to keep the rooms 'fresh, calm and modern' while working at Sandringham over lockdown. Pictured, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge recorded a video message from their Sandringham office earlier this year

Deirdre Mc Gettrick, Founder and CEO of ufurnish.com explained Prince William and Kate Middleton have opted for a muted neutral tone of earthy cream to keep the rooms ‘fresh, calm and modern’ while working at Sandringham over lockdown. Pictured, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge recorded a video message from their Sandringham office earlier this year

According to interior design expert Deirdre Mc Gettrick, Kate's use of a nature-inspired trend is known to improve our wellbeing and bring harmony into our homes. Pictured, the Duchess in her temporary office at Sandringham

According to interior design expert Deirdre Mc Gettrick, Kate’s use of a nature-inspired trend is known to improve our wellbeing and bring harmony into our homes. Pictured, the Duchess in her temporary office at Sandringham 

‘William and Kate have opted for a muted neutral tone of earthy cream to keep their rooms fresh, calm and modern.’ 

Interior design expert Benji Lewis agreed that the tone that Kate has struck with the interiors at both Sandringham and Kensington Palace is ‘neutral contemporary classic.’

‘Clearly there’s an enjoyment of timeless chalky – almost ballet pink – with her choice of wall colour, which has been interjected with accent colours that are distinctly harmonious and calm,’ he explained. 

‘Absolutely no colour clashes here, it’s actually a very well executed, absolutely inoffensive, colour scheme because whilst it’s clearly lovely taste, it also works brilliantly with her wardrobe choices and sets her up very well backdrop-wise for her virtual appointments.’

Deirdre pointed out that the royal couple have incorporated a trend which has proven popular during lockdown – by bringing plants and greenery into their decor. 

Pictured, The Duchess of Cambridge during her video call to Little Village, the London based charity which provides clothes, toys and equipment for babies and children up to the age of five, on their fifth anniversary on 12 February 2021. The video call took place at Sandringham, where the Duchess worked while living at Anmer Hall over lockdown

Pictured, The Duchess of Cambridge during her video call to Little Village, the London based charity which provides clothes, toys and equipment for babies and children up to the age of five, on their fifth anniversary on 12 February 2021. The video call took place at Sandringham, where the Duchess worked while living at Anmer Hall over lockdown

The interior design experts also added that the use of family photographs offers a more personal feel to the Sandringham room - which has been the backdrop of several Zoom videos amid the Covid-19 pandemic (pictured). The same photos are seen in the Kensington Palace appearances

The interior design experts also added that the use of family photographs offers a more personal feel to the Sandringham room – which has been the backdrop of several Zoom videos amid the Covid-19 pandemic (pictured). The same photos are seen in the Kensington Palace appearances 

‘This use of a nature-inspired trend is known to improve our wellbeing and bring harmony into our homes,’ she explained.  

The interior design experts also added that the use of family photographs offers a more personal feel to the living room and the Sandringham office – which has been the backdrop of several Zoom videos amid the Covid-19 pandemic.

‘This is calm, well-curated polish that’s gentle and traditional and the family photos on the sideboard behind her suggest an approachability, “we’re letting you into our personal space” type feel,’ Benji explained.

Deirdre added: ‘Whilst dark furniture would have also been used previously to accessorise the space, the Duke and Duchess have chosen to continue this heritage feel of using natural wooden materials, but instead accessorising the work surfaces with modern gold photo frames, adding a homely ambiance and personal touch by displaying their family photographs and favourite artwork. 

‘Certain patterns capture the essence of nature in a subtle way and these can actually have a positive effect on our wellbeing and reduce stress levels, because of our desire to be closer to nature.’ 

Benji explained that the manner in which the upholstered pieces have been handled 'isn't overly elaborate.' Pictured, the Duchess of Cambridge at Sandringham during a video call last month

Benji explained that the manner in which the upholstered pieces have been handled ‘isn’t overly elaborate.’ Pictured, the Duchess of Cambridge at Sandringham during a video call last month

Benji went on to say that while it would be easy to assume the budget for decoration would likely have been generous, the manner in which the upholstered pieces have been handled ‘isn’t overly elaborate.’ 

‘The tailoring on the sofas is great, nothing loose covered, or baggy – and yet a possible little contrast piping aside, added embellishment like nailhead detail has been left out, so it really is contemporary classic,’ he explained.

‘Layering colour and tone has been thought through, because the soft mint green is echoed by the sharper colour in the super healthy looking plants behind Kate.’  

He adds that the artwork on the walls suggests grandeur but it’s not being ‘shoved in our faces.’

‘Likewise the antique furniture indicates that there’s a kind of make do with what we have approach rather than ‘blank canvas/blank cheque – let’s go shopping,’ he continued. ‘Considering the home to whom this belongs it’s clever because it’s absolutely not flashy but it’s unquestionably got gloss, and it’s smart and considered.’

Interior design expert Benji Lewis added that the artwork on the walls suggests grandeur but it's not being 'shoved in our faces.' Pictured, Kate at home at Kensington Palace, London, in November last year

Interior design expert Benji Lewis added that the artwork on the walls suggests grandeur but it’s not being ‘shoved in our faces.’ Pictured, Kate at home at Kensington Palace, London, in November last year

‘By conducting her virtual appointments from the comfort of her sofa – rather than over a desk – this again suggests that we’re engaging with an off duty, affable and approachable Royal.’

Deirdre also explains that many different textures forming our surroundings, and that the royal couple appear to have taken inspiration from this, layering their homes with different textures in the form of embroidered floral cushions. 

‘Incorporating a touch of red into these accessories, they have delicately embraced the regal heritage of their property through the use of this colour,’ she explained. 

Benji added: ‘Dipping into pattern is a decorative detail that has been embraced via the inclusion of the multiple cushions – embroidered in a kind of Ottoman fashion with scrolling foliage – but this could be off the peg shopping rather than bespoke.’ 


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