UK

Map shows Britain’s huge income divide – how well off are people where YOU live?

Britain’s wealth divide was laid bare today as new figures mapped the nation’s rich and poor.

The Office for National Statistics set out to local authority level the income of people across the country.

It revealed that in some areas people are earning six-tenths of the national average income, whereas in others they are earning three times it. 

The map shows that the higher income areas are mainly in London and the South and South East, plus Cheshire, North Yorkshire and East Cumbria in northern England, plus Edinburgh, Aberdeen and much of Eastern Scotland. 

Within London, wealth was concentrated in Kensington and Chelsea, Hammersmith and Fulham, Camden, the City and Westminster.

In contrast the lowest income areas were mainly urban areas in the Midlands, North West, North East, Yorkshire and the Humber.

At the same time the ONS released details of the rate of ‘income deprivation’, the proportion of people living in a council area who are unemployed or on a low income.

Use the drop down menu below to find out how your local area ranks within England.  

Income deprivation is the per cent of people living in a local authority area who are unemployed or on low income. 

The income deprivation ranking is the local authority area’s position relative to the rest of the country.   

The ONS today revealed that in some areas people are earning six-tenths of the national average income, whereas in others they are earning three times it.

England's poorest and richest local authority areas. Source: ONS

England’s poorest and richest local authority areas. Source: ONS

Perhaps not surprisingly the top 10 areas with the lowest income were urban areas in the North and Midlands, while the 10 with the highest income are in leafier parts of the South and East. 

All the figures date from 2019, the latest period for which they are available. 

At the same time the ONS mapped the UK’s productivity to show the ‘commuter effect’. 

This sees large urban areas are rated as highly productive but with very low incomes compared to rural/urban areas around them because of the diffuse workforce.

But because of the commuter effect some of these low wealth areas are also shown to be highly productive, with workers in well-paid jobs commuting in from surrounding towns and suburbs. 

A closer look: Areas with the highest rates of income deprivation 

By Henry Martin for MailOnline  

#1: Knowsley

Knowsley ranked joint first in the ONS figures, with an income deprivation rate of 25.1%. It had a population of 11,343 in 2001, according to that year’s Census.  

Located in Lancashire, just east of Liverpool, the metropolitan borough takes its name from the parish of Knowsley, the seat of the earls of Derby and home to the Stanley family since the 1300s.  

But it was in the 20th century when Knowsley saw most of its industrial development, apart from Prescot – a significant watchmaking centre in the 18th century. 

The parish includes Knowsley Hall and Knowsley Safari Park. It features  three main built-up areas: the village of Knowsley, the nearby business park in the north west, and a suburban area including Stockbridge Village and the northern fringe of Huyton.

Its Parliamentary constituency, Knowsley, was created in 2010 from two seats – Knowsley South, and Knowsley North and Sefton East, both Labour Party strongholds. 

The current constituency’s MP is Labour’s George Howarth.  

Joint #1: Middlesbrough

Middlesbrough, a large town in North Yorkshire located on the River Tees’s southern bank, came joint first with Knowsley in the ONS list of areas with the most income deprivation. 

It was historically a rural, farming area until the coal industry sparked significant industrial development in the early 19th century. 

Ironworks in the town also brought about a large demand for labour, spurring large numbers of settlers from Wales and Ireland to flock to the area, which officially became a town by the mid-1800s, in part due to the population boom. 

Middlesbrough became strongly associated with steel, iron and shipbuilding for the next century, which led to the German air force, the Luftwaffe, targeting it during World War Two. 

But trade fell in the late 1990s, and now the local economy is known for its contribution to digital enterprise.  

The Parliamentary constituency of Middlesbrough has been a Labour stronghold since its creation in 1974. 

The Parliamentary constituency of Middlesbrough has been a Labour stronghold since its creation in 1974 (pictured: Middlesbrough town centre)

The Parliamentary constituency of Middlesbrough has been a Labour stronghold since its creation in 1974 (pictured: Middlesbrough town centre)

#3: Blackpool

Blackpool, a large town and seaside resort in north west England, has an income deprivation rate of  24.7%, according to the ONS figures. 

The unitary authority of Blackpool in the north west of England has a population of 139,720, and the wider built-up area has 239,409 inhabitants – the second largest in Lancashire, according to 2011 Census figures. 

Blackpool was a coastal hamlet until the mid-1700s, when travel to the coast became more popular. 

But it was the construction of the railway in the 1840s that saw Blackpool rise to the forefront of English tourism, having been connected to the industrial heartland of northern England. 

It was incorporated as a borough in 1876 following an influx of settlers, and it first became known as Britain’s premier seaside resort by the start of the 20th century.

Its main attractions and landmarks include Blackpool Tower, Blackpool Illuminations, the Pleasure Beach, Blackpool Zoo, Sandcastle Water Park, the Winter Gardens, and Britain’s only surviving first-generation tramway.

Paul Maynard was elected as the Conservative MP for Blackpool North and Cleveleys in 2010 when the constituency was created. 

Scott Benton MP, also a Conservative, is the Member of Parliament for Blackpool South, having assumed office in December 2019, taking it from Labour’s Gordon Marsden. 

Blackpool, a large town and seaside resort in north west England, has an income deprivation rate of 24.7%, according to the ONS figures (pictured: Blackpool Tower, March 23)

Blackpool, a large town and seaside resort in north west England, has an income deprivation rate of 24.7%, according to the ONS figures (pictured: Blackpool Tower, March 23)

#4: Liverpool

Liverpool has an income deprivation rate of 23.5%, according to the recent ONS statistics.

The Merseyside city and metropolitan borough was ranked as the tenth largest English district with a population of nearly 500,000, according to 2019 figures. 

Its metropolitan area is Britain’s fifth largest, boasting a population of 2.24 million. 

Liverpool became a borough in 1207, a city in 1880, and a county borough independent of Lancashire in 1889. 

Its expansion as a major port was paralleled by the growth of the city throughout the Industrial Revolution, becoming associated with general cargo, freight, raw materials such as coal and cotton, along with the slave trade. 

In the 1800s Liverpool was home to the Cunard and White Star Lines, and was the port of registry of the ocean liners RMS Titanic, RMS Lusitania, RMS Queen Mary, and RMS Olympic.

It was also a major port of departure for English and Irish emigrants to North America. 

Liverpool, which is notable for its close association with the arts, was ranked fifth on the list of the most visited UK cities in 2019.

The city’s five Members of Parliament are all affiliated with the Labour Party.  

Liverpool became a borough in 1207, a city in 1880, and a county borough independent of Lancashire in 1889 (pictured: A statue of the Beatles is seen in Albert Dock, April 2020)

Liverpool became a borough in 1207, a city in 1880, and a county borough independent of Lancashire in 1889 (pictured: A statue of the Beatles is seen in Albert Dock, April 2020)

#5: Hartlepool

Hartlepool’s income deprivation rate stands at 22.8%, ONS figures show.

The port town, located 17 miles southeast of Durham, dates back to the 7th century. 

It was founded around the monastery of Hartlepool Abbey, and grew throughout the Middle Ages.

But its expansion took off significantly in the early 19th century following the establishment of a railway link, and industrialisation saw the boom of the region’s shipbuilding industry up until the First World War – when it became the target of the German Navy, 

But following a decline in shipbuilding following World War Two, the region suffered high unemployment rates until the 1990s.  

The Parliamentary constituency of Hartlepool is represented by the Conservative Party’s Jill Mortimer, who took the seat from Labour’s Mike Hill on May 6, 2021. 

Pictured: The National Museum of the Royal Navy Hartlepool and the tall ship HMS Trincomalee at Jackson Dock in Hartlepool

Pictured: The National Museum of the Royal Navy Hartlepool and the tall ship HMS Trincomalee at Jackson Dock in Hartlepool


Source link

Related Articles

Back to top button