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Meet the international jet-setting families making themselves at home in the UK

From Asia’s richest man to ‘the Bill Gates of Africa’ and the ‘prince of vaccines’, Tatler has revealed its definitive list of some of the world’s wealthiest families who ‘run the world’ from the UK. 

For its March issue, the British society bible delved into the international jet-setting families landing in Britain – such as Princess Diana‘s twin nieces Lady Amelia and Eliza Spencer, 29, who recently moved to London from their native Cape Town.

Elsewhere, the patriarch and matriarchs explored in the list included Asia’s wealthiest man Mukesh Ambani, who last year purchased Buckinghamshire’s Stoke Park for £57million.

The Ambani family – made up of Mukesh’s wife Nita, 58, their Ivy League-educated children, 30-year-old twins Isha and Akash, and 26-year-old Anant – sent shock waves through their home country of India after spending Diwali at the British estate rather than at their 27-storey residence in Mumbai.

Meanwhile, London-based Zimbabwean Strive Masiyiwa – dubbed the ‘Bill Gates of Africa’ – was also mentioned, having become the first black billionaire to make The Sunday Times Rich List last year.

He and his jet-setting wife Tsitsi, 57, and his six children split their time between his homes of London, Surrey and New York.

Here, FEMAIL takes a look at the international wealthy families landing in Britain…  

The Ambanis

Mukesh Ambani is the richest man in Asia, and the 10th wealthiest in the world, according to the latest figures from Forbes, with an estimated fortune of around £70billion. Pictured: Mukesh Ambani, his wife Nita Ambani, his daughter Isha and groom Anand Piramal, pose during Isha and Arnand wedding reception in Mumbai in 2018

Neeta Ambani, Anant Ambani, Mukesh Ambani and Isha Ambani attend the IPL opening celebration in March 2010 in Mumbai

Neeta Ambani, Anant Ambani, Mukesh Ambani and Isha Ambani attend the IPL opening celebration in March 2010 in Mumbai 

Mukesh Ambani is the richest man in Asia, and the 10th wealthiest in the world, according to the latest figures from Forbes, with an estimated fortune of around £70billion.

Last year, he purchased Buckinghamshire’s Stoke Park for £57million through his business Reliance Industries Limited (RIL).

The regal estate is made up of 300 acres and was turned into an English country club in 1908, with Prince Albert, Queen’s Victoria grandson, serving as its first president.

RIL’s acquisition of the estate has sparked concern in both India and the UK, with most asking whether Stoke Park will become the Ambani family’s permanent abode? 

In India, there is a worry that Ambani will leave the country (with his money) and call his new 18th-century mansion home – concerns the family has firmly denied, according to the publication.

Meanwhile, those in the UK are concerned that if Stoke Park becomes a private residence, it will stop functioning as a much-loved country club – a suggestion RIL reportedly continues to reject.

The Ambani family – made up of Mukesh’s wife Nita, 58, their Ivy League-educated children, 30-year-old twins Isha and Akash, and 26-year-old Anant – sent shock waves through their home country of India after spending Diwali at the British estate rather than at their 27-storey residence in Mumbai.

India’s five day festival of lights is the country’s biggest and most important annual celebration. 

The multi-industry magnate made headlines in 2010 when his $1billion residence Antilia was unveiled in Mumbai. 

The 27-storey abode measures 400,000 square foot, has three helicopter pads, underground parking for 160 cars, and requires some 600 staff to run.

Mukesh, who owns much of oil, retail and bio-technology Reliance Industries, paid £44million to build his dream property, but astronomical property values in the Indian city mean it is thought to be worth 15 times that amount. 

The businessman surprised many by constructing Antilia – named after a mythical island – as he built his business reputation as a private individual who avoided the flamboyance of India’s ultra-rich.

Hamish McDonald, author of a history of the family business Ambani and Sons, told The Guardian: ‘Perhaps he has been stung by his portrayal in the media as an introvert. Maybe he is making the point that he is a tycoon in his own right.’

The vast building is constructed from glass, steel and tiles and also features a four-storey hanging garden which is designed to keep the interior cooler in summer and warmer in the winter.

Multi-industry magnate Mukesh with his daughter Isha at the wedding of Bollywood actress Priyanka Chopra and Nick Jonas in Jodhpur, India

Multi-industry magnate Mukesh with his daughter Isha at the wedding of Bollywood actress Priyanka Chopra and Nick Jonas in Jodhpur, India

The interior of the property, on Altamount Road, was designed by a US firm and has been previously described as ‘Asian contemporary’.

Shiny Varghese, then deputy editor of Indian magazine Design Today, previously said: ‘It’s so obscenely lavish that I’m not sure too many people will go all that way, but we are heading into the sort of culture where money is not a question when setting up a home.’

But friends defended him against charges of excess. One told the newspaper: ‘He can’t just walk into a cinema and watch a film like you or me. It’s only a family home, just a big one. It’s a question of convenience and requirements.’

In December 2018, his daughter Isha Ambani and billionaire property mogul husband Anand Piramal tied the knot in front of VIP guests including Hillary Clinton and Priyanka Chopra at her family’s Mumbai home. 

The wedding of Yale graduate Miss Ambani and Mr Piramal was thought to cost as much as $100million (£74.9million) and involved a string of events – including a private concert from Beyoncé. Other estimates put the cost at $15million (£12million). 

Also in attendance was Miss Ambani’s close friend Priyanka Chopra and husband Nick Jonas. Miss Ambani acted as bridesmaid when Priyanka married Nick in their own extravagant Indian wedding a month earlier.  

Last year, he purchased Buckinghamshire's Stoke Park (pictured) for £57million through his business Reliance Industries Limited (RIL)

Last year, he purchased Buckinghamshire’s Stoke Park (pictured) for £57million through his business Reliance Industries Limited (RIL)

In December 2018, his daughter Isha Ambani and billionaire property mogul husband Anand Piramal tied the knot in front of VIP guests including Hillary Clinton and Priyanka Chopra at her family's Mumbai home (pictured)

In December 2018, his daughter Isha Ambani and billionaire property mogul husband Anand Piramal tied the knot in front of VIP guests including Hillary Clinton and Priyanka Chopra at her family’s Mumbai home (pictured)

Mukesh has previously been described by his wife as quiet, modest and shy and the family’s social media is kept private. He enjoys visiting wildlife parks and once said he tries to watch three Bollywood films a week.

The billionaire inherited the makings of his wealth from his father Dhirubhai, who was the son of a Gujarati village school teacher.

Said to have moved to Mumbai with just a few rupees in his pocket, according to the Times of India, his father went on to build a global-scale petroleum company in 40 years.

Mukesh was one of two sons, Anil being the other. He trained as a chemical engineer in Mumbai, and went to Stanford University, US, before working for his father.

The businessman then inherited his section of the business after his father died of a stroke in 2002.

Originally the brothers tried to run it together but, following feuding, their mother stepped in and split it into two parts.

Mukesh walked away with the petroleum, oil, gas and textiles arms while his brother got the telecommunications, asset management, entertainment and power generation parts.

But this didn’t stop the entrepreneur from entering these markets. In 2013 he signed a deal with New Delhi-based Bharti Airtel to build India’s 4G network and launched his own smartphone brand, LYF, which became the third most popular in the country.

Other business ventures include working with fashion labels such as Jimmy Choo, Paul Smith and Emporio Armani.

In May 2019, he bought the iconic British toy store Hamleys for a reported £67million. Ambani’s Reliance Brands business secured a deal to buy the world’s oldest toy retailer from Chinese fashion conglomerate C Banner International.

The move brought to an end Hamleys’ four-year spell under the Hong-Kong based firm, which bought it for £100million.

Hamleys, which was founded in 1760, has 167 stores across 18 countries. Reliance already operates 88 Hamleys stores across 29 Indian cities.

The Masiyiwas 

London-based Zimbabwean Strive Masiyiwa - dubbed the 'Bill Gates of Africa' -, pictured with his family, became the first black billionaire to make The Sunday Times Rich List last year

London-based Zimbabwean Strive Masiyiwa – dubbed the ‘Bill Gates of Africa’ -, pictured with his family, became the first black billionaire to make The Sunday Times Rich List last year

London-based Zimbabwean Strive Masiyiwa – dubbed the ‘Bill Gates of Africa’ – became the first black billionaire to make The Sunday Times Rich List last year.

He and his jet-setting wife Tsitsi, 57, and his six children split their time between his homes of London, Surrey and New York.

The Zimbabwe-born businessman, 61, sits on the boards of Netflix and Unilever, and is considered as one of Africa’s most generous humanitarians – having helped secure millions of doses of the Covid vaccine for the continent.

Mr Masiyiwa rise to wealth is a remarkable one, with his parents having fled Rhodesia when he was a child. 

He was born in the country – now modern day Zimbabwe – in 1961. When he was aged 7 his parents fled the country amid the unrest after Ian Smith’s government declared independence from Britain.

His family moved to Zambia, where Mr Masiyiwa attended primary school, before moving to the UK aged 12.

He attended a private secondary school in Scotland – paid for by his entrepreneur mother – before later earning an engineering degree from the University of Wales.

For a short time he worked in Cambridge in the computer industry, but later returned to Africa.

Upon returning to Zimbabwe in 1984, four years after it had gained independence from Britain, Mr Masiyiwa began working in telecoms. He set up his company Econet in 1993.

In 1998, despite opposition from then Zimbabwean president Robert Mugabe – who died in 2019 – he launched a mobile phone network.

Strive Masiyiwa and his wife Tsitsi Masiyiwa at the 23rd Opera Gala at Deutsche Opera in Berlin in October 2016

Strive Masiyiwa and his wife Tsitsi Masiyiwa at the 23rd Opera Gala at Deutsche Opera in Berlin in October 2016

Mugabe refused to give him a license to operate his business. But Mr Masiyiwa took on the controversial leader to the Constitutional Court of Zimbabwe.

After a five year legal battle, which took him to the brink of bankruptcy, he won and was given the green light to set up the network.

Today the company, known as Econet Wireless Zimbabwe, is the second-largest by market capitalisation.

He later told Forbes that the launch of the network took place ‘at a time when 70 per cent of the country inhabitants had never heard a ringtone’.

After fleeing persecution from the local authorities, Masiyiwa left Zimbabwe, initially to South Africa – where he launched a new Econet Wireless group.

The Econet Wireless group now operates in Africa, Europe, South America and the East Asia Pacific Rim.

After living in South Africa for several years, Mr Masiyiwa moved to London in 2010 and has lived in the capital ever since. He still maintains a significant business interest in South Africa.

While in the UK, Mr Masiyiwa lives in a detached £2.5million mansion on an exclusive private estate in Surrey.

You’ll also find him browsing book shelves in Bloomsbury or Piccadilly, telling Tatler: ‘I love London’s bookshops. They are second to none anywhere in the world.’

As well as his country estate, he owns a £24million mansion on the outskirts of the British capital, where he’s lived with his children Tanya, Vimbai, Moses, Joanna, Esther and Sarah.

Mr Masiyiwa lived in Zambia before his family moved to the UK aged 12. Strive with former US president Barack Obama in 2016

Mr Masiyiwa lived in Zambia before his family moved to the UK aged 12. Strive with former US president Barack Obama in 2016

Aged between 19 and 30, their jobs range from social entrepreneurs, journalists and CEOs. Their home reportedly has 24 rooms, a pool and 15-acres of ground.

Mr Masiyiwa also owns high profile properties in New York, including two adjacent apartments atop the 29-storey Eldorado Towers – which have been at various points home to stars such as Michael J. Fox, Moby and Alec Baldwin.

He bought the two properties for $24.5million in 2016. According to 2019 reports, he also owns a £24million mansion, with 24 rooms – including nine bathrooms with ensuite bathrooms.

Mr Masiyiwa is also known as one of the most prolific African philanthropists, focusing in particular on young people.

He founded the Higherlife Foundation together with his wife Tsitsi, which pays school fees for some 40,000 students in Zimbabwe, South Africa, Burundi and Lesotho who are either orphaned or from low-income families.

He has provided scholarships to more than 250,000 young Africans over the past 20 years through his family foundation.

The couple also established the Ambassador Andrew Young Scholarship, which enables African students to attend the Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia, US.

In 2012, President Barack Obama invited Masiyiwa and four other business leaders to attend the 38th G8 summit at Camp David to address them on strategies on how to increase food production and end poverty in parts of Africa.

And in 2014, Fortune Magazine named Masiyiwa as one of the 50 most influential business leaders in the world.

He made the Forbes billionaire sheet in 2018, with his total worth then estimated to be around $2.3billion.

The Spencer twins 

Lady Amelia Spencer and her sister Lady Eliza Spencer attend the Miss Dior launch event for Dior's new Miss Dior Eau de Parfum in Dusseldorf, Germany in September. The blue-blooded beauties are Princess Diana's nieces

Lady Amelia Spencer and her sister Lady Eliza Spencer attend the Miss Dior launch event for Dior’s new Miss Dior Eau de Parfum in Dusseldorf, Germany in September. The blue-blooded beauties are Princess Diana’s nieces 

The nieces of Princess Diana, Lady Eliza and Lady Amelia Spencer, grew up between Constantia, South Africa, and their family’s seat, Althorp in Northamptonshire.

But last year they both moved to Britain’s capital for the first time, and said they planned to ’embrace all that London has to offer’. 

Amelia and Eliza, who are both signed to Storm Model Management, are looking forward to fulfilling long-held ambitions; Amelia hopes to become a wedding planner and Eliza dreams of being an interior designer.

Earlier this year, the pair were hailed by society bible Tatler as among the hottest and most elegant socialite siblings from across the world who are used to moving in the same circles as supermodels, aristocrats and royals.

They were ranked among others as one of the most glamorous sets of twins on the elite social scene.

And in recent months, the sisters have given a host of interviews to high-profile society magazines including Tatler.

The twins, pictured at a Fortnum and Mason event in November 2021, recently moved to London from South Africa

The twins, pictured at a Fortnum and Mason event in November 2021, recently moved to London from South Africa 

They graced the cover of the society bible in March, before starring in their own photoshoot in the pages of Hello earlier this summer.

Alongside their elder sister Kitty and younger brother Louis, 27, the sisters grew up with their father and mother Victoria Aitken in Constantia, South Africa, but spent significant time in the UK after their parents split and Charles moved back to the family’s seat, Althorp.

They have two half-sisters and half-brother from their father’s second and third marriages, and half-brother from their mother’s second marriage.

But the sisters have an unbreakable bond as twins, with Lady Amelia telling Tatler she and Lady Eliza have always been close and are ‘very similar’.

‘We love doing the same things and share the same friends,’ she said. ‘You’re guaranteed to have a best friend there always – you can’t really compare it to anything else.’

The dynamic duo have admitted they are very similar and said the family is very open and values the importance of talking about mental health

The dynamic duo have admitted they are very similar and said the family is very open and values the importance of talking about mental health 

She added that they are a ‘very open family’ and value the importance of talking about mental health.

‘It was never something that we felt afraid to talk about when we had our own struggles,’ Lady Eliza said.

The society beauties also told Tatler they have very fond memories of Althorp, the Spencer family seat, where they’d stay with their father during the school holidays.

‘It is a truly special and beautiful place. Having spent the first three years of our lives at Althorp, exploring and discovering it as children, and being part of a long heritage of Spencers that have lived there, it has always felt like another home,’ Lady Eliza said.

‘And of course it conjures up memories of family Christmases as children, with our extended family all together.

Amelia’s fiancee Greg revealed earlier last summer that they would be moving to London, posting on Instagram and calling the move ’emotional’.

In the post, shared in June, Greg said: ‘My fiancé and I decided to relocate to the UK and are currently in transit in France! Whilst it may seem like we got lucky (in many ways, we did), moving countries is difficult.’

Proving their bond is ‘unbreakable’, Lady Eliza followed in her footsteps.

Speaking to Hello magazine, Amelia, who is living just 20 minutes away from her twin sister in central London, said: ‘It feels very exciting to finally have made the move. London will challenge and inspire us.’

Excited to make the most of the London social scene, the sisters added to the magazine they can’t wait to see what the future holds.

‘Kitty has always told us how much she particularly enjoys Wimbledon and the Serpentine Summer Party and we have always hoped to go. We are looking forward to our first London Fashion Week.’

‘Moving to a place like London will allow us to experience all the incredible events and opportunities that London has to offer.’

‘We can’t wait to see what the future holds,’ Amelia added. ‘I’ve always imagined I’d end up in the UK, it just took a little longer than I’d planned. We’re thrilled to finally be here. For me, this is where my future is.’   

The Poonawallas

'Vaccine Prince' Adar Poonawalla and Natasha Poonawalla attend the Dadasaheb Phalke International Film Festival Awards on February 20, 2020 in Mumbai

‘Vaccine Prince’ Adar Poonawalla and Natasha Poonawalla attend the Dadasaheb Phalke International Film Festival Awards on February 20, 2020 in Mumbai

Cyrus Poonawalla, 81, founded the world’s largest vaccine manufacturer, The Serum Institute, and has joined forces with vaccine developers including Novavax, Codagenix and AstraZeneca.

He created it in 1966, but the family has been involved in the pharmaceutical business for years.

The family background was in racehorse breeding, and after one horse was bitten by a snake, the firm was created to allow them to make treatments themselves.

The horse’s death after bureaucratic delays meant no serum was available prompted Poonawalla senior to found the company.

Part of the Poonawalla-owned campus in Pune is still a stud farm today, but it also employs hundreds of workers on its huge-scale global vaccine production.

Natasha who spends her time between Mumbai and Mayfair, here pictured with British Vogue's Editor-in-Chief Edward Enninful is well-connected

Natasha who spends her time between Mumbai and Mayfair, here pictured with British Vogue’s Editor-in-Chief Edward Enninful is well-connected

Cyrus is the chairman of the Institute, with an estimated net worth of $19billion (£14billion), and has passed the baton to his son, Adar Poonawalla, who acts as CEO, with a net worth of $16.8billion (£12.4billion).

They invested millions in Covid vaccines last year, before they knew of their effectiveness, but Adar told NPR: ‘It was just a quick five-minute chat between myself and my father.’

Adar and his wife, Natasha Poonawalla, are Mayfair and Mumbai based, with some of her best friends in the highest parts of society: the Marchioness of Bath, Priyanka Chopra Jones, and Bollywood actress Kareena Kapoor.

The family spend most of their time in their £50,000-a-week London pad, a Georgian townhouse in Mayfair and one of the largest properties in the neighbourhood.

Adar even put a £550million bid on buying the JW Marriott Grosvenor House as their second London home, with the plan to have a private residency that joins on to the five-star hotel.

They have had great influence on important matters in the UK too – during the pandemic, they joined forces with Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to speed the production line of the AstraZeneca vaccines, to help provide Covid vaccinations for poorer countries across the globe.

Cyrus S. Poonawalla, left, with his daughter-in-law Natasha and his son Adar at the Poonawalla race at Mahalaxmi race course in February 2011

Cyrus S. Poonawalla, left, with his daughter-in-law Natasha and his son Adar at the Poonawalla race at Mahalaxmi race course in February 2011

And in Oxford University – there is a research building in their name – The Poonawalla Vaccines Research Building – which they donated £50million to last year.

Their worldwide business makes 1.5billion vaccines every single year, for many diseases including measles, rubella, tetanus and more.

Meanwhile, some of the family fortune has gone on supercars including the CEO’s so-called ‘batmobile’, believed to be a £40,000 adaptation of a Mercedes S350.

The family also owns Ferraris and Rolls-Royces including a vintage Silver Shadow and a Phantom Drophead Coupe, according to Indian media.

The couple have four abodes globally that they share with their two sons, Cyrus, 12, and Darius, 6, and which are home to their collection of Rembrandts, Renoirs and Van Goghs.  

Their sons go to boarding school for half the week – and enjoy gluten-free vegan meals, visits to museums and art galleries in the British capital and no mobile phones at the table.

Natasha grew up in a modest cottage in Pune with her mother and stepfather before meeting her husband in 2001, while studying a master’s degree at the London School of Economics.

She had returned to India for the holidays and came across her husband at a New Year’s Eve party in Goa.

Natasha and Adar, who studied at St Edmund’s School, Canterbury, and the University of Westminster, were wed in 2006 after a long distance relationship.

The businesswoman delights her Instagram followers with her bold, lavish statement pieces and vibrant ensembles. 

‘I don’t see being a businesswoman and having a passion for fashion as mutually exclusive,’ she told Hello! India.   

She also said to Vogue India: ‘I think I was misjudged a little bit. Why should I not be true to who I am? 

‘Often people couldn’t understand what I was wearing, my husband said: “If you love it, do it.” If you are comfortable being ridiculously dressed, how does it matter to anybody else? 

‘There are times when, after a rough day at work, I come down to dinner all dressed up because it makes me happy.’ 

The Gates’ 

Microsoft founder Bill Gates and his family (pictured) have had influence over the UK for a number of years, with the man himself receiving an honorary knighthood in 2005 for his charitable activities around the world and 'his contribution to enterprise in Britain'

Microsoft founder Bill Gates and his family (pictured) have had influence over the UK for a number of years, with the man himself receiving an honorary knighthood in 2005 for his charitable activities around the world and ‘his contribution to enterprise in Britain’

Microsoft founder Bill Gates and his family have had influence over the UK for a number of years, with the man himself receiving an honorary knighthood in 2005 for his charitable activities around the world and ‘his contribution to enterprise in Britain’.

He has a mansion in Holland Park, is a member of London’s private members club, 5 Hertford Street, in Mayfair, and lands one of his four private jets in Luton airport when he fancies a visit to his beloved second home, the UK.

Details aren’t known about his home in London, but as for his place in Lake Washington, near Seattle, he has a trampoline park and an artificial beach which has sand imported specially from the Caribbean.

But despite Bill’s apparent love for the capital, you’re unlikely to spot him around the city, said social photographer Richard Young.

He told Tatler: ”People like that know how to make themselves invisible. Or when it suits them, to make themselves briefly visible.’

In 2004, he made a deal between Microsoft and the NHS, which saved the health service £330million, at no extra cost to the government or the taxpayer.

He has a mansion in Holland Park, is a member of London's private members club, 5 Hertford Street, in Mayfair, and lands one of his four private jets in Luton airport when he fancies a visit to his beloved second home, the UK. Pictured, with his family

He has a mansion in Holland Park, is a member of London’s private members club, 5 Hertford Street, in Mayfair, and lands one of his four private jets in Luton airport when he fancies a visit to his beloved second home, the UK. Pictured, with his family

But despite Bill's (pictured) apparent love for the capital, you're unlikely to spot him around the city, said social photographer Richard Young

But despite Bill’s (pictured) apparent love for the capital, you’re unlikely to spot him around the city, said social photographer Richard Young

The contract was for the licence renewal of desktop products for the NHS, which allowed them to use 900,000 licences instead of the 500,000 they had at the time – but did not have to pay that extra £330million.

Bill and Melinda Gates, who divorced in 2021, pledged to give away 95 per cent of their fortune within their lifetime, and between 1994 to 2018, they gave The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation $36billion over the years, according to their website.

With a net worth of $132.6billion (£97.9billion), a lot of his money has gone towards health projects through their charitable foundation, including vaccines against diseases like malaria, HIV, and polio.

In October 2021, Gates and Prime Minister Boris Johnson put a combined figure of £400million into ‘under-invested green technologies’ to help cut carbon emissions in Britain, and announced it at the Global Investment Summit in London ahead of the COP26 climate summit last year.     

The Ibrahims  

Mo Ibrahim

Hadeel Ibrahim, above, at the annual Friends Of The Institute of Contemporary Arts dinner at ICA on October 1, 2018 in London

Mo Ibrahim, left, and his daughter Hadeel Ibrahim, right, at the annual Friends Of The Institute of Contemporary Arts dinner at ICA on October 1, 2018 in London

Sudanese-British billionaire businessman Mohammed ‘Mo’ Ibrahim made his wealth through founding Celtel in 1998, a telecommunications company that operated in 14 African countries.

The telecoms magnate, through Celtel (now known as Airtel after it was sold in 2004 to Kuwait-based telecommunication company, now called Zain), sold over 24 million mobile phone subscribers.

The 75-year-old founded the Mo Ibrahim Foundation in London in 2007, a trust offering scholarships for University of Birmingham, SOAS, and a master’s degree in Business at London Business School for African students.

His daughter, Hadeel Ibrahim, 38, has been the director of the charitable Foundation since 2006, when she was just 22 years old, and both are now based in London.

Hadeel studied Politics and Philosophy at Bristol University, and now lives in a grade II listed building, Walpole House in Chiswick Mall.

Her father, who has an estimated net worth of £812million, has a Marylebone townhouse, complete with five bedrooms.

As a philanthropist, she is also co-chair of nonprofit organisation the Africa Centre in New York, which helps collaborate African businessmen and women, leaders, artists and people to note with people in the US, as well as being on the board of the Clinton Foundation.

The high-society 38-year-old, who has spent Thanksgiving celebrations with Bill and Hillary Clinton at their house in Westchester, New York, sits in line to inherit her father’s wealth, as the oldest of his three children, from mother Hania Morsi Fadl, a Sudanese-British radiologist and founder of the Khartoum Breast Cancer Centre in the capital of Sudan.

His retirement is expected soon at 75 years old, and with a majority stake in private equity firm Sati, which has approximately £5.9billion in assets, there is a lot to pass down to the 38-year-old who is said to be ‘relentless’ but ‘loves to have a good time’.


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