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Mum shares her ‘game-changing’ meal prep trick for preparing minced garlic in bulk

A savvy mum has revealed how she cuts costs by freezing dozens of pre-prepared garlic cloves ahead of time. 

Posting in popular money-saving group Budget Friendly Meals Australia, money-wise member Robyn said she waits for garlic to be ‘cheap’ and buys it in bulk to save both time and money.  

‘I buy a lot of it then pop it in a food processor and blend until fine then add oil and blend until smooth,’ Robyn wrote.

‘I pop it into ice cube trays and freeze then pop them out and put into a container or Ziploc. I use them in everything but I don’t have time to freshly mince some every time. This is just a time saver for those who need it.’

A savvy mum has revealed how she cuts costs on staples by processing and freezing dozens of pre-prepared garlic cloves ahead of time (pictured)

Robyn does the same thing with ginger, chilli and herbs and says they always turn out ‘perfect from freezer to pot’.

With herbs, she suspends them in water before freezing them.

When asked why she didn’t use minced garlic from a jar instead, Robyn said the flavour of her frozen cubes is much better.

‘I find that one has a funny taste and not as strong,’ she said. ‘Minced jar garlic has nothing on fresh garlic. I can’t stand the taste of the stuff in the jar.’

The handy trick has been liked more than 200 times, with many dubbing the time-saving idea as a new go-to in their household. 

It’s not the first time a freezer hack has blown up this month, with a man recently sharing his  ‘unbelievable’ trick for freezing ice cubes in a matter of minutes. 

What are the health benefits of adding garlic to your meals? 

Garlic has a number of health benefits mainly in the areas of immunity. 

Immunity: Garlic may support a healthy immune system and defend against bacteria and other microbes to help keep you healthy all year round and may help to relieve the associated symptoms of respiratory illnesses.  

It can help to  relieve uncomfortable cold symptoms including mucous congestion due to its sulphur compounds known as allicin and ajoene, which are produced when garlic is crushed or chewed. 

Antioxidants: Rich in antioxidants, garlic may help to defend against damaging free radicals. 

High doses of garlic supplements have been shown to increase antioxidant enzymes in humans, as well as significantly reduce oxidative stress in those with high blood pressure.

Highly nutritious and low calorie:  One clove (3 grams) of raw garlic contains Manganese: 2% of the Daily Value (DV), Vitamin B6: 2% of the DV, Vitamin C: 1% of the DV, Selenium: 1% of the DV, Fiber: 0.06 grams and decent amounts of calcium, copper, potassium, phosphorus, iron and vitamin B1.

Source: Cenovis & Healthline

Scott, a tattoo artist from Victoria, posted a now-viral TikTok video showing his ‘life hack’ for creating ‘instant’ ice using hot tap water.

To make ice in a flash, he simply filled the two trays with steaming hot water.

‘I bet you didn’t know you could put hot water in ice cube trays and put them straight in the freezer… Leave them in there for one minute,’ he claimed.

‘After one minute, it will turn instantly frozen… Science mother f***ers.’ 

Following a brief moment, the man shared a footage of himself pulling out the trays showing the ice cubes frozen solid.  

It's not the first time a freezer hack has blown up this month, with a man recently sharing his 'unbelievable' trick for freezing ice cubes in a matter of minutes

Following a brief moment in the freezer, the man shared a footage of himself pulling out the trays showing the ice cubes frozen solid

It’s not the first time a freezer hack has blown up this month, with a man recently sharing his ‘unbelievable’ trick for freezing ice cubes in a matter of minutes 

Why hot water can freeze faster than cold

Scientists previously found that hot water can freeze faster than cold water, an effect known as the ‘Mpemba effect’ – a ‘counterintuitive physical phenomenon revealed when hot water freezes faster than cold water’.

James Brownridge, from the State University of New York, found in his experiment hot water cools faster because of the bigger difference in temperature between the water and the freezer.

This helped it reach its freezing point before the cold water reached its natural freezing point, which is at least 5 degrees Celsius lower.

Source: Phys.org 

A team of scientists previously found that hot water can freeze faster than cold water under certain conditions, an effect known as the ‘Mpemba effect’ – a ‘counterintuitive physical phenomenon revealed when hot water freezes faster than cold water’. 

The effect first emerged in the 1960s after schoolboy Erasto Mpemba, from  Tanzania, claimed in his science class that ice cream would freeze faster if it was heated first before being placed in a freezer. His theory was quickly proven after a school inspector tried the experiment at home – and it worked.

But despite the effect, there is no clear evidence to support the effect.

After Scott shared his video, which has since been viewed more than 570,000 times, hundreds of people took particular issue with the way he filled the ice trays after water was seen splattering everywhere.

‘The way you’re filling it really irritates me,’ one woman wrote, while another suggested: ‘Life hack: Don’t have the water on full when filling your ice tray.’

And one added: ‘New hack… Pour the water only over the first two cubes then tilt the tray… the water will evenly spread without the splash back.’ 

To make ice in a flash, he simply filled the two trays with steaming hot water and placed them in the freezer for 'one minute'

The man pulled out the tray to find ice cubes, claiming the method takes just one minute

To make ice in a flash, he simply filled the two trays with steaming hot water and placed them in the freezer for ‘one minute’

Dozens pointed out he was wasting a lot of water while others explained why you should never store hot liquid in the freezer.

‘Hot water or anything hot can affect the temperature of your freezer. There’s a reason why you’re told not to put steaming hot food in your fridge,’ one wrote.

And another added: ‘As far as I know, it’s not good putting any hot food or water in the fridge.’

Others backed up the man’s statement, saying hot water does freeze faster than cold – but they insisted it actually takes longer than one minute to get frozen ice.

‘I don’t think it does it in one minute but hot water does often freeze quicker than cold, it’s solid science,’ one claimed. 


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