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Mums are obsessed with this game-changing packed lunch hack

Mums are obsessing over a ‘game-changing hack’ for making packed lunches for their children – and all you need is a spare afternoon and some plastic containers.

The Australian woman called Amelia posted on Facebook where she said she spent one weekend afternoon washing, cutting and peeling various fruits, vegetables and eggs.

She then put each food in a separate plastic container so that her kids could pick out what they wanted to eat at school the next day.

Mums are obsessing over a ‘game-changing hack’ for making packed lunches for their children – and all you need is a spare afternoon and some plastic containers (pictured)

The Australian woman called Amelia put a variety of different fruits, vegetables and food into separate containers in the fridge, so her kids could choose what they want for their lunch

The Australian woman called Amelia put a variety of different fruits, vegetables and food into separate containers in the fridge, so her kids could choose what they want for their lunch

‘My kids picked their lunch for school,’ Amelia wrote on Facebook.

‘They loved the whole experience.’ 

She also shared several photos of cucumber, baby tomatoes, mushrooms, celery, hard-boiled eggs, grapes, strawberries, salad leaves, nectarines and cauliflower, all of which were in separate containers.

The final picture showed one of Amelia’s kids’ lunchboxes for that particular day, which her child had filled with two hard-boiled eggs, a nectarine, two strawberries, cucumbers and a miniature packet of Shapes.

Amelia's child chose two hard-boiled eggs, two strawberries, cucumber, a nectarine and a packet of Shapes on this particular day (pictured)

Amelia’s child chose two hard-boiled eggs, two strawberries, cucumber, a nectarine and a packet of Shapes on this particular day (pictured) 

Hundreds who saw the post said they ‘love the idea’ and they would definitely try it.

‘We do this every morning,’ another mum said. 

‘It saves uneaten food and teaches them independence of packing their own meal.’

Others asked how fresh the un-packaged foods stay in the containers for an entire week, with some suggesting that adding a paper towel to the bottom of each container hugely helps.

‘OMG I am so doing this, super organised, it stays fresher and easy to grab!’ another commenter added.

A nutritionist and former English teacher has revealed how to pack the perfect lunchbox - and it all comes down to including as many different ingredients as possible (Lee Holmes pictured)

A nutritionist and former English teacher has revealed how to pack the perfect lunchbox – and it all comes down to including as many different ingredients as possible (Lee Holmes pictured)

Previously, a nutritionist and former English teacher has revealed how to pack the perfect lunchbox – and it all comes down to including as many different ingredients as possible.

What does the ideal school lunchbox contain?

* WHOLEGRAIN OR SOURDOUGH BREAD: Slow release carbohydrates help to stabilise blood sugar levels.

* PROTEIN: Lean meat, salmon, tuna, egg or tofu will help with alertness and endurance.

* HEALTHY FATS: Things like sunflower seeds, avocado and pumpkin seeds increase satiety, help to stabilise kids’ moods and boost their concentration.

* VEGETABLES X 2-3: Foods such as capsicum, carrot, mashed potato and cucumber contain fibre, vitamins and minerals kids need to keep their immune systems healthy.

Sydney expert Lee Holmes said that over her years as a teacher, she has ‘seen the impact that nutritious meals can have on students’ and how it can really make a difference to their performance in the classroom. 

Firstly, Lee said your child should always be involved in the choosing of your child’s lunchbox – as this will make them more likely to want to eat from it later. 

‘Let your child be involved in the purchasing of their lunchbox, make sure it’s sturdy with a strong lid, insulated or comes with an ice pack,’ Lee said.

She recommends picking something with separate pockets or ‘sections’ in them to avoid cross-contamination and ensure wet and dry foods are kept separately.

‘Using smaller lidded containers will protect the lunchbox and its contents and alleviate the need for foil and cling wrap,’ Lee said. 

She uses these small containers for food items like dips, salads, fruit, wraps and casseroles.

When it comes to what you should keep in your child’s lunchbox, Lee said colour is key for visual appeal. 

‘A nutritionally-balanced lunchbox should contain an array of food from various food groups,’ Lee said.

She recommends plant-based treats like fresh juices and smoothies, chopped-up vegetables and hummus and seeds, as well as blueberries and strawberries over jelly and rich jams.

‘Use different types of fruits and vegetables, seeds, coconut flakes, full fat calcium rich dairy foods, protein rich foods such as meats, eggs, seed butters, pulses and tuna and oily fish,’ the nutritionist advised.

They will need some form of carbohydrates and healthy fats to ensure they stay full through the long day.

Things like sunflower seeds, avocado and pumpkin seeds can increase satiety, help to stabilise kids’ moods and boost their concentration. 


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