UK

Now police forces are ‘investigating rape and murder cases’ from their own homes

Detectives investigating murder and rape are WFH so they can ‘have a few more cups of tea and beat the traffic’: Police Federation chairman defends officers working from home… as force is accused of ‘taking public for fools’

  • Hampshire Constabulary is among those allowing officers to work from home
  • Hybrid working is likely to continue having been a success, federation chair says
  • But Government source says: ‘It sounds like they are taking the public for fools’

Police officers are reportedly investigating serious crimes including murders and rapes from home.

New hybrid working policies brought in by the pandemic are being used across the country, including in areas with some of the nations’ highest crime rates.

Hampshire Constabulary, which has the seventh-highest number of crimes out of the 43 forces in England and Wales allows officers to work from home.

Zoe Wakefield, the chairman of the Hampshire Police Federation, said hybrid working is likely to continue as an option for officers having been a success in the force. 

Zoe Wakefield, the chairman of the Hampshire Police Federation, said hybrid working is likely to continue as an option for officers having been a success in the force 

She told the Daily Telegraph that it is ‘definitely positive’ for officers’ work-life balance if you can ‘have some days [when] you know you don’t need to worry about fighting traffic, you can probably have a few more cups of tea during the day than you do normally, and it is a bit more of a relaxed atmosphere’. 

The national treasurer at the Police Federation, Simon Kempton, said that although many duties still need to be done in person, there are ‘some, like detectives, that are still working at home’.

‘Broadly speaking, it could be pretty much any sort of an inquiry that could be done with a laptop or a phone.

‘Whether it’s shoplifting or a murder or anything in between, anything that can be done from wherever… I think what the pandemic showed is that we can think slightly more laterally.’

Simon Kempton, national treasurer at the Police Federation, said that although many duties still need to be done in person, there are ‘some, like detectives, that are still working at home’

Norfolk and Suffolk constabularies have a ‘modern workplace’ policy in which supervisors must ‘treat individuals fairly regardless of the individual’s location’.

Durham Constabulary put out a glowing report on their work from home policy saying it has improved ‘work-life balance and overall wellbeing’ for staff and will therefore remain.

‘It sounds like they are taking the public for fools,’ a government source told the Daily Telegraph. 

‘Surely you would get far better challenges and inspiration – as well as the ability to scrutinise leads and ideas with your colleagues – in the office rather than sitting on your own at home.’

Hampshire Constabulary police officers stand outside a crime scene (file picture)

Hampshire Constabulary police officers stand outside a crime scene (file picture)

Meanwhile, it emerged today that Bank of England advisers are still setting interest rates over video calls even though it scrapped working from home guidance months ago.

Meetings of the Bank’s monetary policy committee, which sets interest rates, take place with some attending in person and others virtually.

Bank of England staff only have to come to the office for one day a week despite it pulling advice that they should work from home in January.

From June 6, they will be expected to be back 40 per cent of the time – with a long-term aim to be back for 50 per cent.

The Bank has faced criticism over its hybrid working policy amid anger over its failure to curb inflation, which this week hit 9 per cent.

Advertisement


Source link

Related Articles

Back to top button