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Record numbers of Britons are buying motorhomes for staycations, leading to a shortage 

We’re running out of motorhomes: Record numbers of Britons are buying the vehicles for staycations, leading to a shortage

  • One dealer had 20 enquiries a week before the pandemic – now it’s 500 a day 
  • Caravan and Motorhome Club said record number joined last month 
  • The National Caravan Council says there are 225,000 motorhomes in Britain 

Record numbers of Britons are buying motorhomes for staycations, leading to a shortage of vehicles.

As the pandemic threatens overseas holidays, motorhome dealers are facing huge demand.

Alistair Norman, of Revolution Campervans in Northamptonshire, dealt with 20 enquiries a week before the pandemic – now it’s 500 a day. 

Record numbers of Britons are buying motorhomes for staycations, leading to a shortage of vehicles 

He said: ‘Demand has gone up exponentially.’ Karl Pearce, of KTG Caravans and Campers in Staffordshire, said buyers were waiting up to six months, adding: ‘It’s crazy. Prices have shot up.’

The Caravan and Motorhome Club said a record number of members joined last month.

The National Caravan Council says there are 225,000 motorhomes in Britain – and sales have tripled since 2000.

Golf clubs teeing up fees hike 

Golf clubs are cashing in on the post-lockdown rush by increasing fees by up to 70 per cent. Many are already fully booked for the next two weeks.

Experts are expecting the high turnout to continue throughout the summer.

The Daily Mail has found dozens of clubs that have dramatically increased playing fees and membership costs.

One well-connected club manager said some had ‘been keen to make hay while the sun shines’.

A weekend round after 3pm at Surrey National for example went from £35 to £60 – a 71 per cent rise. Its parent company said it was a case of ‘supply and demand’.

Golf clubs are cashing in on the post-lockdown rush by increasing fees by up to 70 per cent. Many are already fully booked for the next two weeks (file image)

Golf clubs are cashing in on the post-lockdown rush by increasing fees by up to 70 per cent. Many are already fully booked for the next two weeks (file image)

Players at Westerham Golf Club, Kent, will have to pay over a third more for a similar weekend round after prices rose from £50 to £68.

A company spokesman said: ‘We’ve lost a hell of a lot of money over the past 12 months and there’s enough people to pay those prices.’

Golf’s popularity last summer when restrictions were eased saw nearly two thirds more rounds played between July and September compared with 2019.

Weddings back but you may NOT kiss the bride 

Couples can have spring weddings from Monday – but with a new rule that says ‘you may not kiss the bride’.

After this week’s easing, small-scale receptions will be allowed from the beginning of next month. But there will be strict limits on numbers of guests, plus other pandemic regulations.

Among restrictions that will last at least until mid-summer are social distancing rules that say attendees should stay at least two metres away from anyone who is not in the same household bubble.

Newly-wed couples will be banned from kissing before the guests or congregation unless they have been living together before the wedding.

Couples can have spring weddings from Monday ¿ but with a new rule that says ¿you may not kiss the bride¿. After this week¿s easing, small-scale receptions will be allowed from the beginning of next month. But there will be strict limits on numbers of guests, plus other pandemic regulations (file image)

Couples can have spring weddings from Monday – but with a new rule that says ‘you may not kiss the bride’. After this week’s easing, small-scale receptions will be allowed from the beginning of next month. But there will be strict limits on numbers of guests, plus other pandemic regulations (file image)

Sir Paul Coleridge, a former High Court judge who set up the Marriage Foundation think tank, called the order ‘bizarre’.

He said: ‘Having restricted wedding parties to just six people, they bizarrely order those from different households, which may include the bride and groom, to keep their distance. This advice is based on the wrong assumption that all couples live together before they marry, which is simply not the case.’

During the winter lockdown, weddings have been allowed only in ‘exceptional’ circumstances – which in practice usually means one of the couple is terminally ill.

From Monday, all couples can marry, but only six people may attend and there can be no reception. From April 12, 15 people may go to a wedding and there can be receptions for 15 guests in outdoor venues, but not in private gardens.

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