UK

Ring recalls 350,000 smart doorbells after some of them caught fire 

Fire bell: Amazon-owned Ring recalls 350,000 smart doorbells sold in the US and Canada after reports of them overheating an bursting into flames

  • Doorbell’s battery can overheat when incorrect screws are used for installation
  • Fires have resulted in ‘minor property damage’ and a few reports of ‘minor burns’
  • Issue affects 350,000 units of the second-gen Ring video doorbell sold in the US

Amazon’s home security arm Ring has recalled 358,000 of its smart doorbells sold in North America after some of them caught fire.

After receiving complaints of property damage and ‘minor burns’, the company has recalled units of its £89 second-generation video doorbell, released this year. 

The doorbell’s battery can overheat when the incorrect screws are used for installation, posing fire and burn hazards, according to a notice posted by the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). 

The issue affects about 350,000 units sold in the US and another 8,700 sold in Canada, and UK users are unaffected, Amazon told MailOnline. 

Ring doorbells allow users to monitor their home remotely with live video streams and notifications on their smartphone, thanks to its in-built camera. 

This recall involves Ring Video Doorbell (second generation, pictured), with model number 5UM5E5

‘Ring has received 85 incident reports of incorrect doorbell screws installed with 23 of those doorbells igniting, resulting in minor property damage,’ the CPSC notice reads.

‘Consumers should immediately stop installing the recalled video doorbells and contact Ring for revised installation instructions.’

The firm received 85 incident reports of incorrect doorbell screws installed, with 23 of those doorbells igniting, resulting in minor property damage, and eight reports of minor burns.  

The affected units, which have model number 5UM5E5, were purchased at electronics and home goods stores in the US and online at Amazon.com and Ring.com from June to October this year.  

Consumers can determine if their doorbell is included in the recall by entering the doorbell’s serial number on the support page on Ring’s website or app. 

The Ring logo is printed on the bottom front of the doorbell and the model and serial number are on a label on the back of the doorbell and the outer packaging. 

Amazon told MailOnline that UK users are unaffected and will not need to worry about returning their Ring doorbells. 

Consumers in the US and Canada can see if their doorbell is affected by the issue by entering the doorbell’s serial number (S/N) on the support page on Ring's website or app

Consumers in the US and Canada can see if their doorbell is affected by the issue by entering the doorbell’s serial number (S/N) on the support page on Ring’s website or app

‘The safety of our customers is of the utmost importance to us,’ a spokesperson said. 

‘We have contacted known customers who own a second-gen Ring video doorbell to ensure they receive the updated user manual and are following the device installation instructions.’ 

Ring doorbells integrate with voice-controlled Alexa devices in the home to launch real-time video.

This means users are able to see and speak to visitors from your smartphone, tablet or PC wherever they are – or be on the look out for intruders remotely. 

The connected Ring app allows users to receive motion-activated alerts whenever someone triggers the sensor or presses the doorbell.  

Ring revealed a heap of new products in September this year, including a weird home surveillance drone that flies around the house when homeowners aren’t there and keeps an eye out for intruders. 

It consists of a flying black camera, powered by rotor blades, that automatically takes off from a stationary white dock if it detects movement in the house.

Unveiled by Ring, the Always Home Cam can fly to check if the stove is off or the window is still open while the user is away.

Unveiled by Ring, the Always Home Cam can fly to check if the stove is off or the window is still open while the user is away.

The camera streams a live view of what’s going on in the user’s home to their smartphone via the Ring app, in case of unwelcome visitors. 

The drone only records when it is in the air and makes a sound when it flies, so any people in the house know it is recording. 

Amazon said was inspired to create a security product that could move more freely throughout the home to ‘give more viewpoint flexibility’. 

The US firm also unveiled an updated spherical design for its Echo smart speakers and a new cloud gaming service. 

Amazon’s home security business has been growing since its acquisition of Ring in February 2018. 

WHAT IS RING AND WHY DID AMAZON BUY IT?

Amazon acquired home security startup Ring for a reported £700 million ($1 billion).

The home security startup sells doorbells that capture video and audio.

Clips can be streamed on smartphones and other devices, while the doorbell even allows homeowners to remotely chat to those standing at their door.

Ring sells doorbells (left) that capture video and audio. Clips can be streamed on smartphones and other devices, while the doorbell even allows homeowners to remotely chat to those standing at their door

Ring sells doorbells (left) that capture video and audio. Clips can be streamed on smartphones and other devices, while the doorbell even allows homeowners to remotely chat to those standing at their door

Ring promotes its gadgets as a way to catch package thieves, a nuisance that Amazon has been looking to remedy. 

Amazon late last year unveiled its own smart lock and camera combination called Amazon Key in a move into home security.

Key is designed to provide a secure and trackable way for packages to be delivered inside homes when people aren’t there.

Amazon has bought home security startup Ring for a reported £700 million ($1 billion)

Amazon has bought home security startup Ring for a reported £700 million ($1 billion)

Ring’s doorbell could work well with Amazon Key, which lets delivery personnel put packages inside a home to avoid theft or, in the case of fresh food, spoiling.

California-based Ring first caught the spotlight with a failed quest for funding about five years ago on reality television show Shark Tank.

Ring went on to win backing from the likes of billionaire Richard Branson and Amazon’s Alexa Fund.

Advertisement




Source link

Related Articles

Back to top button