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Skilled hauliers negotiate huge 220ft rotor blades through tiny villages and narrow roads 

Mirror, signal and one heck of a manoeuvre: Skilled hauliers negotiate huge 220ft rotor blades through tiny villages and narrow roads

  • Haulier company  P. Adams Schwertentransporte shared the astonishing images
  • The Luxembourg transporters carried the 25-tonne blade through country lanes
  • The blades are attached to a platform which can pivot according to the roads 

Incredible photos show how a team of hauliers carried a 220 wind turbine blade on the back of a moving truck.

Luxembourg-based P. Adams Schwertentransporte shared the astonishing images of the 25-tonne blade being manoeuvred around narrow country roads.

The transport company, which operates across Europe, posted the images on their LinkedIn page, prompting incredulity online at the impressive feat of engineering.

Luxembourg-based P. Adams Schwertentransporte shared astonishing images of a 25-tonne, 220ft wind turbine blade being manoeuvred around narrow country roads

The transport company, which operates across Europe, posted the images on their LinkedIn page, prompting incredulity online at the impressive feat of engineering

The transport company, which operates across Europe, posted the images on their LinkedIn page, prompting incredulity online at the impressive feat of engineering

They wrote: ‘Finishing the year with a set of 67m rotor blades on a challenging route.’

Many have even accused the company of Photoshopping the pictures.

The images show the huge blade being held aloft at an angle by the lorry as it makes its way through the quiet streets and villages. 

The hauliers deliberately avoid cities and have to ensure power lines are temporarily taken down in order for them to pass through safely.

Unlike the rest of the turbine, the blade cannot be disassmbled and has to be transported in one part. 

The images show the huge blade being held aloft at an angle by the lorry as it makes its way through the quiet streets and villages

The images show the huge blade being held aloft at an angle by the lorry as it makes its way through the quiet streets and villages

It cannot travel horizontally because of the turns on the narrow roads so is therefore secured at an angle between 20 and 45 degrees.

The blade is attached to a platform that allows it to move up and down or side to side according to the direction of travel, in order to evenly distribute the weight on the winding roads. 

The record for the longest blade transported in this way was broken in 2016 when a 290ft turbine was carried through Denmark.  

Wind farms needing the blades for their turbines are often located in the countryside, far from the manufacturing plants that produce them. 

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