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Taliban say ‘there will be no democracy… it is sharia law and that is it’

The Taliban have said there won’t be democracy because ‘it is sharia law and that is it,’ as desperate Afghans, including the country’s biggest pop star, flee the country.

Spokesman Waheedullah Hashimi told Reuters: ‘There will be no democratic system at all because it does not have any base in our country.

‘We will not discuss what type of political system should we apply in Afghanistan because it is clear. It is sharia law and that is it.’

Aryana Sayeed, a singer and judge on the Afghan version of The Voice, was one of those fortunate to escape the country on a US cargo jet on Wednesday.

‘I am well and alive and after a couple of unforgettable nights, I have reached Doha, Qatar and am awaiting my eventual flight back home to Istanbul,’ the 36-year-old told her 1.3 million Instagram followers.

But other prominent women like Salima Mazari, one of the country’s first few female governors, have already been rounded up and arrested.

Ms Mazari was an outspoken critic of the Taliban during her time as governor of the Hazara district and there are fears that the jihadists may execute her. 

'I am well and alive and after a couple of unforgettable nights, I have reached Doha, Qatar and am awaiting my eventual flight back home to Istanbul,' Ms Sayeed said on Instagram.

BEFORE AND AFTER BIDEN’S WITHDRAWAL: Aryana Sayeed (left), a singer and judge on the Afghan version of The Voice, was one of those fortunate to escape the country on a US cargo jet on Wednesday (right)

Ms Sayeed later posted a picture on a flight from Doha, Qatar, to Istanbul, Turkey

Ms Sayeed later posted a picture on a flight from Doha, Qatar, to Istanbul, Turkey

Ms Sayeed is a judge on the Afghan version of The Voice

She is one of the country's most famous recording artists, with more than 1.3 million followers on Instagram

Ms Sayeed is a judge on the Afghan version of The Voice (left) and one of the country’s most famous recording artists, with more than 1.3 million followers on Instagram

Prominent women like Salima Mazari, one of the country's first few female governors, have already been rounded up and arrested (pictured in July scouting positions in Balkh province with her men)

Prominent women like Salima Mazari, one of the country’s first few female governors, have already been rounded up and arrested (pictured in July scouting positions in Balkh province with her men)

Ms Mazari (pictured in July) was an outspoken critic of the Taliban during her time as governor of the Hazara district and there are fears that the jihadists may execute her

Ms Mazari (pictured in July) was an outspoken critic of the Taliban during her time as governor of the Hazara district and there are fears that the jihadists may execute her

Meanwhile, supporters of al-Qaeda and other Islamist groups have been celebrating the rise of the Taliban, sparking new fears that the country will become a breeding ground for terror.

‘Afghanistan is Conquered and Islam has Won,’ a message on a pro-al-Qaeda social media account said on Monday.

It went on to congratulate ‘the brothers’ in the Taliban on their victory.

Taliban spokesman Hashimi said on Wednesday that the country would build an elite force with the expertise of the routed Afghan army, which British and US taxpayers paid a fortune for over the last 20 years. 

‘Most of them have got training in Turkey and Germany and England. So we will talk to them to get back to their positions,’ Hashimi said.

‘Of course we will have some changes, to have some reforms in the army, but still we need them and will call them to join us.’

Hashimi said the Taliban especially needed pilots because they had none, while they had seized helicopters and other aircraft in various Afghan airfields during their lightning conquest of the country after foreign troops withdrew.

‘We have contact with many pilots,’ he said. ‘And we have asked them to come and join, join their brothers, their government. We called many of them and are in search of (others’) numbers to call them and invite them to their jobs.’ 

He said the Taliban expected neighboring countries to return aircraft that had landed in their territory – an apparent reference to the 22 military planes, 24 helicopters and hundreds of Afghan soldiers who fled to Uzbekistan over the weekend

He went on to reveal that the country may be governed by a ruling council now that the Taliban has taken over, while the terror group’s supreme leader, Haibatullah Akhundzada, would likely remain in overall charge. 

The Taliban would also reach out to former pilots and soldiers from the Afghan armed forces to join its ranks, Hashimi said.

Babies were thrown over barbed wire towards troops at Kabul airport in a desperate bid to get them out of the country as the west's ignominious exit from Afghanistan continued

Babies were thrown over barbed wire towards troops at Kabul airport in a desperate bid to get them out of the country as the west’s ignominious exit from Afghanistan continued

A British soldier carries an Afghan girl away from crowds at the gate, as Defence Secretary Ben Wallace today urged people not to pass their children to troops because they will not get a seat on flights out

A British soldier carries an Afghan girl away from crowds at the gate, as Defence Secretary Ben Wallace today urged people not to pass their children to troops because they will not get a seat on flights out

Overnight chaos at Kabul airport

Overnight chaos at Kabul airport

Troops fired gunshots and let off stun grenades at the entrance to the northern military side of the airport overnight in a vain bid to keep crowds of thousands from rushing the gates

Overnight chaos at Kabul airport

Overnight chaos at Kabul airport

Tens of thousands of Afghans have gathered at the north and south entrances to Kabul airport in the hopes of securing a seat on western evacuation flights out of the country

How successful that recruitment is remains to be seen. Thousands of soldiers have been killed by Taliban insurgents over the last 20 years, and recently the group targeted U.S.-trained Afghan pilots because of their pivotal role.

The power structure that Hashimi outlined would bear similarities to how Afghanistan was run the last time the Taliban were in power from 1996 to 2001.

Then, supreme leader Mullah Omar remained in the shadows and left the day-to-day running of the country to a council.

Akhundzada would likely play a role above the head of the council, who would be akin to the country’s president, Hashimi added.

‘Maybe his (Akhundzada’s) deputy will play the role of ‘president’,’ Hashimi said, speaking in English.

The Taliban’s supreme leader has three deputies: Mawlavi Yaqoob, son of Mullah Omar, Sirajuddin Haqqani, leader of the powerful militant Haqqani network, and Abdul Ghani Baradar, who heads the Taliban’s political office in Doha and is one of the founding members of the group.

Many issues regarding how the Taliban would run Afghanistan have yet to be finalized, Hashimi explained, but Afghanistan would not be a democracy. 

Hashimi said he would be joining a meeting of the Taliban leadership that would discuss issues of governance later this week.


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