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Tatler reveals the very lavish country houses bringing Regency era Britain to life in Bridgerton 

With its scandal and sexual dalliances, raunchy Netflix period drama Bridgerton promises to keep viewers entertained when it premieres on Christmas Day.  

The series focuses on the story of Daphne Bridgerton (Phoebe Dynevor), the eldest daughter of a wealthy family, as she dives into the social scene of Regency era London in search of a husband, and forms an alliance with dashing Simon Basset, Duke of Hastings, who is played by Regé-Jean Page. 

Dame Julie Andrews narrated the series’ titillating trailer when it was released in early November, as the gossip-loving Lady Whistledown. 

Ahead of its release, Tatler has taken a look at the stunning stately homes, gardens and gentlemen’s clubs that served as filming locations for the series’ ballrooms and palaces. 

While most of the outdoor shots were filmed in Bath, several stately homes feature in the programme, including Lancaster House, which also was used in The Crown, and Painshill Park, the 18th-century landscaped garden located in Cobham.  

Wilton House, Salisbury, Wiltshire

In Bridgerton, the Single Cube Room of Wilton House poses as Queen Charlotte’s throne room. The monarch is played by Golda Rosheuvel, of Luther and Coronation Street fame

Wilton House has been the family seat of the Earl of Pembroke since the 1600s. It was built under William Herbet in 1542. The Single Cube Room, pictured, which is one of Wilton House's seven state rooms, appears in Bridgerton

Wilton House has been the family seat of the Earl of Pembroke since the 1600s. It was built under William Herbet in 1542. The Single Cube Room, pictured, which is one of Wilton House’s seven state rooms, appears in Bridgerton 

Queen Charlotte (Golda Rosheuvel) in front of the dramatic painting that dominates one wall of the Single Cube Room at Wilton House. It is so named because it is shaped like a perfect cube

Queen Charlotte (Golda Rosheuvel) in front of the dramatic painting that dominates one wall of the Single Cube Room at Wilton House. It is so named because it is shaped like a perfect cube

Located in Salisbury, Wiltshire, Wilton House has been the family seat of the Earl of Pembroke since the 1600s. Its opulent Single Cube Room – one of the estate’s seven state room – appears in Bridgerton as the throne room of Queen Charlotte, played by Golda Rosheuvel, of Luther and Coronation Street fame.

The room is shaped like a perfect cube, 30ft wide and high, with gilded and white pine panelling with beautiful carving on the dado – the lower part of the wall – to cornice – horizontal mouldings. 

Its calling was decorated on canvas by the Italian painter Cavalier D’Arpino, with paintings of the mythical Greek architect Daedalus and his son Icarus. 

Before it was granted to the first Earl of Pembroke, William Herbet in 1542, the estate was known as Wilton Abbey and welcomed a Benedictine Covent, which was first established in 802 by Saint Alburga with the permission of Egbert of Wessex. 

When he took control, the first Earl of Pembroke wanted to turn the old abbey into a beautiful Tudor home that reflected his status and wealth. 

The fourth Earl of Pembroke decided to make some changes in 1640 and employed architect Inigo Jones to bring some modernity to the estate.  

Jones designed the Wilton House’s magnificent state rooms, but French architect Isaac de Caus is credited with bringing the Englishman’s vision to life.  

In 1647 a fire destroyed most of Wilton House, with the Single Cube room thought to be the only room that survived. 

The Reform Club, London

Dashing protagonist the Duke of Hastings (Regé-Jean Page), left, meets his friend Anthony Bridgerton (Johnathan Bridgerton), right, for a drink in Bridgerton

Dashing protagonist the Duke of Hastings (Regé-Jean Page), left, meets his friend Anthony Bridgerton (Johnathan Bridgerton), right, for a drink in Bridgerton

The scene was filmed at a real life private members' club: the Reform Club on Pall Mall. Pictured, The internal court of the Reform Club in London, which was built in 1841

The scene was filmed at a real life private members’ club: the Reform Club on Pall Mall. Pictured, The internal court of the Reform Club in London, which was built in 1841

An exterior view of the Reform Club, which is located on Pall Mall

An exterior view of the Reform Club, which is located on Pall Mall

Dashing protagonist the Duke of Hastings (Regé-Jean Page) meets his friend Anthony Bridgerton (Johnathan Bridgerton) for a drink in Bridgerton in what appears to be a gentlemen’s club. 

The scene was filmed at a real life private members’ club: the Reform Club on Pall Mall. 

Construction of this building started in 1837 after the club, which gathered all Liberal political factions under one roof, including the Whigs and the Radicals, was created in 1836. 

The club, which used to be all-male but changed its rules to welcome women in 1981, still exist today, but is no longer affiliated with one given political ideology.

Its three-floor building was designed by Sir Charles Barry in the Italian Renaissance style and contracted to builders Grissell and Peto, it was finished in four years and opened in 1841. Sir Charles is known for rebuilding the Palace of Westminster after it was destroyed by a fire in 1834.    

The principal club chambers are decorated with gilded ceillings, including beautiful carvings of the letter ‘R’ – for Reform and mirrors can be found throughout the club adding in depth and style.  

The club was restored between 2010 and 2014 and has a reported waiting list of one year. It costs £1,500 per month to be a member, as well as a joining fee of £1,843.

Painshill Park, Surrey 

In Bridgerton, the Featherington family, pictured, visit Painshill Park with Marina Thompson, played by Rub Barker (right) and Colin Bridgerton, played by Luke Newton (second right)

In Bridgerton, the Featherington family, pictured, visit Painshill Park with Marina Thompson, played by Rub Barker (right) and Colin Bridgerton, played by Luke Newton (second right)

View of Woollett Bridge on the grounds of Painshill Park in Surrey. The Park, which was created between 1738 and 1773, is one of the best examples of landscaped gardens from the 18th century found in Britain

View of Woollett Bridge on the grounds of Painshill Park in Surrey. The Park, which was created between 1738 and 1773, is one of the best examples of landscaped gardens from the 18th century found in Britain

The stunning Painshill Park, in Surrey, appears as itself in the Netflix show, with the well-heeled Featheringtons visiting on a family day out.     

The park was created from 1738 by Charles Hamilton, a British politician. He had to sell it in 1773 to repay a loan. 

The park originally consisted of 200 original acres boasting 12 follies, including a  grotto, Gothic “temple”, “ruins” of a Gothic abbey, a Roman mausoleum, and a Gothic tower offering an impressive view of the park’s surroundings.

The follies were restored in the 1990s, and Painshill was awarded the Europa Nostra Medal in 1988 for ‘Exemplary restoration from a state of extreme neglect, of a most important 18th century landscape park and its extraordinary buildings.’ 

The park has been reduced to 158 acres and is now owned by Elmbridge Borough Council and managed by the Painshill Trust. It is open to the public for free.

Hatfield House, Hertfordshire

A grand ball is held in Bridgerton, where the two central characters meet. Pictured, actors twirl across the dance floor in Regency costume

A grand ball is held in Bridgerton, where the two central characters meet. Pictured, actors twirl across the dance floor in Regency costume

The scene was filmed in the Marble Hall at the stunning Hatfield House, which boasts chequered black and white flooring and wood panelling

The scene was filmed in the Marble Hall at the stunning Hatfield House, which boasts chequered black and white flooring and wood panelling

An aerial view of Hatfield House, which was build next to the Royal Palace of Hatfield, where Queen Elizabeth I grew up

An aerial view of Hatfield House, which was build next to the Royal Palace of Hatfield, where Queen Elizabeth I grew up

Located in Hertfordshire, Hatflied House has been the home of the Cecil family since it was built in 1611 and is currently the home of Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 7th Marquess of Salisbury.

The land Hatfield House was built under Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury and Chief Minister to King James I. The House was built next to the Royal Palace of Hatfield, the childhood home of Queen Elizabeth I.  

The building is a testament to both Jacobean and Tudorian architecture. 

The House, adjoining the old Palace, was built to entertain Royal Court, and its State Rooms were decorated with paintings, fine furniture and tapestries. 

Hartfield counts an impressive 70 film and TV credits, having appeared in the 2005 movie adaptation of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, as well as 2020’s Netflix films Rebecca (starring Lily James) and Enola Holmes (starring Millie Bobby-Brown).  

It also appeared in the first series of The Crown, where it was used as the home of the Queen’s grandmother, Queen Mary. 

In Bridgerton, Hatfield’s beautiful Marble Hall is the setting for a lavish dance.  

Lancaster House, London

The Long Gallery at Lancaster House, pictured, serves as one of the rooms in Queen Charlotte's palace (pictured)

The Long Gallery at Lancaster House, pictured, serves as one of the rooms in Queen Charlotte’s palace (pictured)

The Music Room at Lancaster House (pictured) also appears in the Netflix drama

The Music Room at Lancaster House (pictured) also appears in the Netflix drama 

The stunning room features a dramatic red and gold colour scheme with heavy red curtains

The stunning room features a dramatic red and gold colour scheme with heavy red curtains

The property also features in The Crown on several occasions, including in this scene between Claire Foy and Matt Smith

The property also features in The Crown on several occasions, including in this scene between Claire Foy and Matt Smith 

An exterior view of Lancaster House, in London which has been featured in The Crown and now in Bridgerton

An exterior view of Lancaster House, in London which has been featured in The Crown and now in Bridgerton 

Lancaster House, located near Buckingham Palace, is no stranger to Netflix dramas. Most recently it appeared in The Crown as a stand-in for Buckingham Palace. 

The beautiful Grade I listed building is managed by the Foreign and Commonwealth office, and is used for state dinners and other formal events. 

It’s also a socialite hot spot, where the Queen Charlotte’s ball, the annual debutantes ball hosted by John Seynour, 19th Duke of Somerset and his wife Judith-Rose, took place in 2019.

For this reason, it is fitting that Lancaster House was used to film several of the balls and party scenes viewers will see in Bridgerton. 

Lancaster House was built in 1825 for the Duke of York and Albany, the second son of  King George II, and was named York House. After the Duke of York’s death in 1927, the house was purchased by the 2nd Marquess of Stafford – later the 1st Duke of Sutherland – who renamed it Stafford House, and completed the works. 

The interior of the house was designed by Benjamin Dean Wyatt, Sir Charles Barry and Sir Robert Smirke, and completed in 1840. 

Its Louis XIV furnishings are home to the Sutherlands’ impressive art collection, a perfect backdrop for any period drama. The home was so sumptuous, Queen Victoria herself is said to have called it a ‘palace’ when visiting. 

Lancaster House’s Grand Hall, which features several times throughout the four series of the Crown, is one of the house’s main attractions.  

And the other locations that feature

Castle Howard, North Yorkshire

Castle Howard, located in North Yorkshire, was also used in Bridgerton

Castle Howard, located in North Yorkshire, was also used in Bridgerton

Most famous for appearing in Brideshead Revisited, this stately home can be admired in North Yorkshire, 15 miles from York, and is part of the Treasure Houses of England group of heritage houses.

The house is the private residence of the Carlisle branch of the Howard family, and while it is not a castle itself, it earned its name by being built on a site where a castle once stood.  

Design work for the house began under the 3rd Earl of Carlisle in 1699. It took 100 to complete its construction after it began in 1701.    

In Bridgerton, Castle Howard serves as the home of Simon Basset, Duke of Hastings (Regé-Jean Page), and his family.   

Somerley House, Hampshire

Somerly House, which is the stately home of James Agar, 7th Earl of Normanton. It is available for private hire for wedding and filming. King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra were particularly fond of the dwelling during their visit

Somerly House, which is the stately home of James Agar, 7th Earl of Normanton. It is available for private hire for wedding and filming. King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra were particularly fond of the dwelling during their visit 

Inside Somerley House. The house appeared in the Crown's series four, where it posed as Prince Charles' Highgrove

Inside Somerley House. The house appeared in the Crown’s series four, where it posed as Prince Charles’ Highgrove 

Located in Hampshire, Somerley House is the home of James Agar, 7th Earl of Normanton and his family. It was designed by Samuel Wyatt between 1792–1795, and became the property of the Normanton family in 1825.   

Jane Austen fans might recognise Somerley House as the location for the 1983 TV adaption of Mansfield Park. The house is not opened to the public, but is available for private hire and filming.

The main house can also be rented for getaways and can accommodate up to 18 people, with two per room.  

It also appeared in The Crown series four, where it posed as the location for Prince Charles’ Highgrove. 

 


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