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Wally’s wrecking spree! Rampaging walrus is pictured clambering aboard ANOTHER boat off Irish coast

He has become a celebrity the world over in recent months with his jaunts keeping us all entertained – and a little bit envious – during lockdown

But, Wally the Walrus may have taken his European tour one step too far, after he was recently spotted clambering aboard yet another boat just off the Irish coast. 

The four-year-old whiskery gentleman started out on his tour in March, and when he fancied a pit-stop, he’d haul his 800kg bulk onto the nearest motorboat and take a nap. Sometimes for several days. 

He was photographed attempting to hope onto a vessel with a little more style and speed on Wednesday, just off the Irish coast in Crookhaven. 

Wally was spotted relaxing on a speed boat in the latest part of his European tour which has taken him across Ireland, England, Wales, and to the coasts of France and Spain 

The lonely walrus is believed to be from Svalbard, north of Norway, and has been on a 4,000km solo trip for months

The lonely walrus is believed to be from Svalbard, north of Norway, and has been on a 4,000km solo trip for months

Wally was first spotted on Valentia Island in Co Kerry in March, and has also been seen off Pembrokeshire in Wales, Cornwall in England, and the coast of France, and most recently in the Isles of Scilly.

Wally was first spotted on Valentia Island in Co Kerry in March, and has also been seen off Pembrokeshire in Wales, Cornwall in England, and the coast of France, and most recently in the Isles of Scilly.

Local went as near as they dared to try to coax the artic walrus from taking a rest on a speedboat in favour of a less expensive rib craft, but he seemed quite at home in the lap of luxury. 

Efforts are now being made to lure Wally onto a specially modified rib in a bid to prevent further damage to more.

Melanie Croce, executive director at Seal Rescue Ireland, said: ‘We hope that the next time he jumps off of the boat, they’re going to try to take the boat away, so that he uses the rib alternatively.’ 

‘If he does take to the rib, which is what we’re hoping he’ll do, then that will be a designated place for him to be safe. 

‘We do know that he has sunk a few boats, and he’s capsized a few boats.

‘This is because it’s an Arctic species, so usually they rely on holding out on sea ice.

‘Since we don’t have sea ice, he is being opportunistic and climbing up on the next best thing, or the closest thing, which would be boats and ribs.’

The four-year-old whiskery gentleman started out on his tour in March, and when he fancied a pit-stop, he'd haul his 800kg bulk onto the nearest motorboat and take a nap. Sometimes for several days

The four-year-old whiskery gentleman started out on his tour in March, and when he fancied a pit-stop, he’d haul his 800kg bulk onto the nearest motorboat and take a nap. Sometimes for several days

Local went as near as they dared to try to coax the artic walrus from taking a rest on a speedboat in favour of a less expensive rib craft, but he seemed quite at home in the lap of luxury

Local went as near as they dared to try to coax the artic walrus from taking a rest on a speedboat in favour of a less expensive rib craft, but he seemed quite at home in the lap of luxury

Efforts are now being made to lure Wally onto a specially modified rib in a bid to prevent further damage to more boats.

Efforts are now being made to lure Wally onto a specially modified rib in a bid to prevent further damage to more boats.

The lonely walrus is believed to be from Svalbard, north of Norway, and has been on a 4,000km solo trip for months.  

From a first sighting off the south-west coast of Ireland, then on to Wales, Cornwall, France, the Isles of Scilly and Bilbao, Wally has left a trail of destruction and a couple of sunk boats in his wake. 

His sighting in Bilbao in northern Spain is believed to be the farthest south a walrus has ever been seen.  

‘The biggest things are to maintain safe distance of at least 100 metres, and to observe quietly,’ Ms Croce added. ‘This is a huge animal, he’s 800 kilos. And so he could hurt someone or he could hurt himself, if he’s scared.

‘If people are startling him and stressing him, it could cause him to cause damage to property. 

She added that Wally’s fans should not share his exact location, as it’s drawing more visitors, which could disturb him and cause injury to himself and others, and damage to more boats. 

The walrus is believed to be from Svalbard, north of Norway, and has been on a 4,000km solo trip for months. Pictured: Wally takes an interest in a boat off the coast of Ardmore

The walrus is believed to be from Svalbard, north of Norway, and has been on a 4,000km solo trip for months. Pictured: Wally takes an interest in a boat off the coast of Ardmore

Wally was previously pictured hitching a ride on a boat so he could sunbathe and rest as experts believe he was seeking physical contact

Wally was previously pictured hitching a ride on a boat so he could sunbathe and rest as experts believe he was seeking physical contact

Alaskan walrus expert Lori Quakenbush said Wally will only be able to move on if the has the energy to make the 3,200km journey home

Alaskan walrus expert Lori Quakenbush said Wally will only be able to move on if the has the energy to make the 3,200km journey home

Wally rested in a boat off the coast of Clonakilty, Ireland earlier this month as part of his tour of Europe

Wally rested in a boat off the coast of Clonakilty, Ireland earlier this month as part of his tour of Europe

Wally resting on the Slipway to the Lifeboat house on May 17, 2021 in Tenby, Wales. The Walrus stayed at Tenby in March making the slipway of the RNLI lifeboat house his regular resting place

Wally resting on the Slipway to the Lifeboat house on May 17, 2021 in Tenby, Wales. The Walrus stayed at Tenby in March making the slipway of the RNLI lifeboat house his regular resting place

Up to 100 people gathered around the walls of the harbour in Crookhaven to catch a glimpse of Wally. 

‘All day, he’s been surrounded by boats, paddleboarders, kayakers, people coming right up close to the boat and sticking cameras in his face,’ Ms Croce said. 

‘We really need to put his welfare and his safety first.

‘So we really are just advising the public to keep a safe distance, to please keep from disclosing the location, and to report it Seal Rescue Ireland’s 24 hour hotline if you do see him.’ 

She added that Wally is also showing signs of an injury to his flipper which could be down to people approaching him, causing him to climb in and out of the boat. 

It is believed Wally’s adventure could be linked to climate change. 

‘I would certainly suspect that sea ice melting due to climate change has displaced him,’ Ms Croce said.

‘You know, animals like walruses and polar bears, ringed seals, hooded seals, these are all species that rely on sea ice.

It is thought Wally is using boats in the same way he would use ice caps in the artic - as a resting place when he gets tired

It is thought Wally is using boats in the same way he would use ice caps in the artic – as a resting place when he gets tired 

She added that Wally's fans should not share his exact location, as it's drawing more visitors, which could disturb him and cause injury to himself and others, and damage to more boats

She added that Wally’s fans should not share his exact location, as it’s drawing more visitors, which could disturb him and cause injury to himself and others, and damage to more boats

His most recent sighting near Ireland has left experts claiming he may be heading back to the Arctic after his adventure

His most recent sighting near Ireland has left experts claiming he may be heading back to the Arctic after his adventure

Wally the Walrus appearing in a boat off the coast of Clonakilty, Ireland earlier this month and appeared to be steering

Wally the Walrus appearing in a boat off the coast of Clonakilty, Ireland earlier this month and appeared to be steering

‘Due to climate change, we’re losing huge amounts of sea ice, and so they’re losing habitats.’ 

His most recent sighting near Ireland has left experts claiming he may be heading back to the Arctic after his European venture.   

‘We do hope that he makes his way northward up the west coast of Ireland, and keeps going and eventually makes it to the Arctic,’ Ms Croce added. 

‘They’re very, very social. So it’s not good for him to be so far away from his kind. We really want him to be back home with his own kind, in his own native habitat. 

Elsewhere in Ireland, locals can also start to be on the lookout for grey seals as their birthing season approaches. 

Ms Croce urged the public to also keep a safe distance from seals and their pups.    

The moment Wally the Walrus greeted holidaymakers in a surprise visit to the Isles of Scilly

The moment Wally the Walrus greeted holidaymakers in a surprise visit to the Isles of Scilly

‘This is the time of year where we’re going to be seeing pregnant females come up on the beach,’ she said. 

‘They’re going to be having their pups and those pups also need to be resting, undisturbed from humans. 

‘If you do come across a seal on the beach resting, please give it space of at least 100 metres.

‘If you do think that it needs help you can call our 24-hour rescue hotline, and we’ll send out a trained volunteer to monitor it and potentially rescue it.’    


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