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‘We knew Jimmy Savile was abusing girls’: Hospital worker says ‘it was obvious’ DJ ‘was into girls’

A hospital worker claims it was ‘very obvious’ Jimmy Savile was abusing young girls but that authorities turned a blind eye because he raised so much money for charity.

Speaking in the documentary Jimmy Savile: The People Who Knew, former Management Services Officer at Leeds General Infirmary David Bret described how administrators would never acknowledge Savile’s inclinations but that it was hinted at.

He said: ‘No one ever directly discussed Savile’s sexual tendencies, but they used to allude to certain things and say, ‘he’s looking at that girl in such a way.

‘There would be some nursing students, about 17 or 18 years old, and people would say ‘Jimmy’s looking at them’ and someone else would say ‘no they’d need 10 years knocking off them for him to be interested’

‘It was very obvious that he was into very young girls.’

Hospital worker David Bret (pictured) claims it was ‘very obvious’ Jimmy Savile was abusing girls but that authorities turned a blind eye because he raised so much money for charity

Jimmy Savile

Jimmy Savile

Jimmy Savile (pictured) died in 2011 aged 84 having never been brought to justice for his crimes. He is now widely believed to be one of Britain’s most prolific sex offenders 

He added: ‘I heard many times Jimmy Savile referred to as a ‘nonce’ or a ‘kiddy fiddler’ – it was always something derogatory.’

Savile died in 2011 aged 84 having never been brought to justice for his crimes. He is now believed to be one of Britain’s most prolific sex offenders.

It is believed he abused hundreds of staff and patients aged between 5 and 75 at hospitals including Broadmoor psychiatric hospital. 

A 2016 report into his abuse found staff at the BBC, who employed Savile for many years, missed numerous opportunities to stop him.

The Dame Janet Smith review identified 72 victims of Savile in connection with his work at the BBC, including eight who were raped. Eleven of his victims were younger than 12 years old. 

In the documentary, released on Discovery+ earlier this month, David describes how staff would joke Savile’s preference for very young girls.

During his lifetime, Jimmy Savile (pictured) was found guilty of leveraging involvement in organisations such as the BBC, charities, hospitals and prison to prey on hundreds of children

During his lifetime, Jimmy Savile (pictured) was found guilty of leveraging involvement in organisations such as the BBC, charities, hospitals and prison to prey on hundreds of children

During his lifetime, Leeds-born Savile had 24-hour access to the city’s General Infirmary and even had an office there.

David, a former employee at the hospital, added: ‘The fundraising had a lot to do with why people didn’t speak up.

‘He was raising a lot of money, he was a very big name, and to lose him meant losing money from the various charities that he was supporting, so had somebody blown the whistle on him then others would have suffered.

‘I think the hospital administration was well aware of what was going on but just kept quiet.’

Savile was famed in the 1970s and 80s for his BBC TV show Jim’ll Fix It, where children would write to Savile and ask them to make their dreams come true.

The DJ, who was one of the BBC’s biggest stars, spent decades grooming, molesting and raping children.

After Savile's death in 2011, ITV released a documentary which kickstarted a police inquiry

After Savile’s death in 2011, ITV released a documentary which kickstarted a police inquiry

It’s feared the predator had abused up to 1,000 children, with some as young as two years old.

After his death in 2011, ITV released a documentary investigating claims of sexual abuse against him, which kickstarted a police inquiry.

Savile was found guilty of leveraging his involvement in organisations such as the BBC, charities, hospitals and prison to prey on hundreds of young children.

Dr Phil Wood, Chief Medical Officer for Leeds Teaching Hospitals said: ‘At the time of the independent investigation we explained that we were extremely saddened by the actions of Jimmy Savile during his involvement with our hospitals in Leeds. This continues to be true.

‘The official report of the independent investigation showed that, through the years, there were individuals who were concerned by Savile’s behaviour.

‘The investigation showed that there was no evidence that these concerns were escalated to senior figures in the Trust to act upon, and there has been no evidence identified of any written complaints either.

‘We have not been made aware of any additional evidence since the investigation report was published.

‘Protecting our patients, staff and public from harm is our top priority and since the report was published in 2014 we have taken on the recommendations to learn from what happened.

‘We are incredibly proud of our Trust today and how our culture has improved beyond recognition.

‘The way hospitals in Leeds operate today is very different from the accounts included in the investigation report, with a much greater focus now on security, safeguarding and raising concerns.

‘We continue to regret the distress experienced by Savile’s victims and their families, and thank them for being brave enough to share their stories.’

Jimmy Savile: The People Who Knew is available to stream now exclusively on discovery+ 

BRITAIN’S ‘PREDATORY’ PAEDOPHILE: HOW THE SAVILE SCANDAL UNFOLDED

October 29, 2011:Veteran DJ and broadcaster Jimmy Savile is found dead in his home in Roundhay, Leeds, aged 84. His death came after a spell of pneumonia.

December 2011: BBC drops Newsnight investigation into his years of sex attacks.

September 30, 2012: It emerges that allegations about Savile will be made in a new ITV documentary, due to be aired on October 3.

October 1:Surrey Police confirms Savile was interviewed in 2007 over allegations dating back to the 1970s but was released without charge.

October 2: Reports that Jerseyand Surrey police both investigated accusations about alleged abuse in two children’s homes, but decided there was not enough evidence to proceed.

October 2:Jeremy Paxman has a furious stand-off with his Newsnight bosses because he disbelieves editor Peter Rippon’s blog into why he dropped the Savile abuse investigation.

October 7: Prime Minister David Cameron calls for the ‘truly shocking’ allegations to be fully investigated.

October 9: Scotland Yard reveals they are looking at 120 lines of inquiry and as many as 25 victims and launches Operation Yewtree.

October 11: Allegations emerge that Savile abused children at Stoke Mandeville Hospital in Buckinghamshire and Leeds General Hospital.

October 12:Then BBC director general George Entwistle offers a ‘profound and heartfelt apology’ to alleged victims as he announces two inquiries – one into potential failings over the handling of the abandoned Newsnightinvestigation, and a second into the ‘culture and practices of the BBC during the years Savile worked here’.

October 19: ScotlandYard announces that Operation Yewtree, the inquiry into alleged child abuse by Savile, is now a formal criminal investigation involving other living people.

October 22: Newsnight editor Peter Rippon, will step aside, it’s announced.

October 25:Scotland Yard says it is investigating in excess of 400 lines of inquiry involving 300 victims, of whom all except two are women. Commander Peter Spindler says Savile is one of the most prolific sex offenders in recent history and the inquiry into his abuse will be a ‘watershed’ investigation into sex crime.

October 26: Itemerges that seven alleged victims of Savile made complaints to four separate police forces – Surrey, London, Sussex and Jersey – while the disgraced television presenter was alive, but it was decided no further action should be taken.

November 2: Newsnight runs controversial report which wrongly linked former Tory party chairman Lord McAlpine to child abuse allegations.

December 19: Pollard Review reveals better leadership could have prevented ‘chaos and confusion’ at BBC over Savile scandal. Peter Rippon replaced as editor of Newsnight.

February 14, 2013: It’s announced that the BBC’s most high-profile woman executive Helen Boaden, formerly director of news, will become director of radio. She had been criticised in the Pollard Review for failing to tackle the ‘virtual meltdown’ in parts of the news department.

February 22: Pollard Review transcripts and appendices are released on BBC website.

March 6: Britain’s top prosecutor Keir Starmer announces tough new measures to avoid ‘another Savile moment’.

2016: The Dame Janet Smith review identified 72 victims of Savile in connection with his work at the BBC, including eight who were raped. Eleven of his victims were younger than 12 years old 


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