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American ‘mercenary’ arrested over assassination filed a restraining order against his neighbors

An American citizen arrested over the assassination of Haiti’s President was involved in a shocking race hate bust-up with his Florida neighbors after he accused them of pinning notes to his door calling him a ‘Haitian n***er’ and an ape, DailyMail.com can reveal.

James Solages, 35, and fellow Haitian American Vincent Joseph, 55, allegedly took part in the brazen commando raid in Port-au-Prince that left President Jovenal Moïse dead and wife Martine fighting for her life.

The pair were paraded on TV Thursday night along with an assortment of Colombians who are accused of being part of the 28-strong death squad who blasted Moise at least a dozen times and gouged out his left eye.

Solages’ involvement is shrouded in mystery but it was reported today he told authorities he believed he was being hired as a translator on a mission to arrest Moise, not to execute him.

Meanwhile puzzling new details are emerging of Solages’ life in the US where he clashed with neighbors at a gated community in Lauderhill, just outside Fort Lauderdale, in 2020.

Haitian-born American citizen James Solages, 35, (above) is said to have confessed to being involved in Wednesday’s early morning raid at the president’s mansion near Port-au-Prince 

Solages, 35, (left) and Joseph Vincent (right) are seen at a Thursday press conference where Haitian authorities paraded the detained suspects. DailyMail.com can reveal that Solages was involved in a bust-up with his Florida neighbors after he accused them of pinning racist notes to his door

Solages, 35, (left) and Joseph Vincent (right) are seen at a Thursday press conference where Haitian authorities paraded the detained suspects. DailyMail.com can reveal that Solages was involved in a bust-up with his Florida neighbors after he accused them of pinning racist notes to his door

Court papers seen by DailyMail.com reveal the argument began when an older couple accused him of stealing their parking space and called security.

Solages refused to move and later claimed to have found his front door plastered with post-it notes containing racist insults. ‘You ape are piece of s**t (sic),’ read one of the slurs, all handwritten in barely-legible English.

Solages sought a restraining order against his neighbors, referred to in court proceedings as Jane and John Doe, accusing them of stalking him and saying the abuse made him fear for his life

Solages sought a restraining order against his neighbors, referred to in court proceedings as Jane and John Doe, accusing them of stalking him and saying the abuse made him fear for his life

Another referred to Solages as a ‘Haitian ni**er’ and warned: ‘You’ll be going out of business, get out of my beautiful building, nobody wants your renting in the balcony’.

Solages sought a restraining order against the couple, referred to in court proceedings as Jane and John Doe, accusing them of stalking him and saying the abuse made him fear for his life.

The man ‘came to my door, taped up a lot of racist words on a paper,’ he wrote in his June 2020 petition.

‘As the paper said, he said that we don’t want Haitian ni**as in our community,’ he went on. ‘He said that I’m a pig get the f**k out of his beautiful building.’

A judge granted a temporary order against the male defendant however it was dismissed at a full hearing one month later when Solages failed to present ‘sufficient’ evidence.

The Miami Herald reported Thursday that Solages had gone to high school in Fort Lauderdale, worked as a building maintenance worker in Lantana, Florida and also ran a small charity raising funds for needy kids back in Jacmel, the Haitian city where it’s believed he was born.

Solages’ LinkedIn page says he has a degree in information technology and also trained for a private investigators’ license at Florida Security school.

It was also confirmed that a decade ago Solages briefly worked as a reserve security guard for a company that provided security for the Canadian Embassy in Port-au-Prince.

His last known residence in the US was a family home he shared will older relatives in Tamarac, Florida. Nobody was home Friday.

Court papers seen by DailyMail.com reveal the argument began when an older couple accused him of stealing their parking space and called security

Court papers seen by DailyMail.com reveal the argument began when an older couple accused him of stealing their parking space and called security

A judge granted a temporary order against the male defendant however it was dismissed at a full hearing one month later when Solages failed to present 'sufficient' evidence

A judge granted a temporary order against the male defendant however it was dismissed at a full hearing one month later when Solages failed to present ‘sufficient’ evidence

 

Court records reveal Solages filed for a divorce last month but the documents throw up yet more questions about his life. His petition lists his wife's name as Marie Claude Ciceron but states that her address, including city and US state, telephone and email address are all 'unknown'

Court records reveal Solages filed for a divorce last month but the documents throw up yet more questions about his life. His petition lists his wife’s name as Marie Claude Ciceron but states that her address, including city and US state, telephone and email address are all ‘unknown’

Solages’ aunt, Victorie Dorisme, said she learned about her nephew’s alleged participation in the assassination on Haitian TV.

‘I’ve never heard of him in any trouble like this,’ Dorisme told the Miami Herald.

Court records reveal Solages applied for a divorce last month but the documents throw up yet more questions about his life.

His petition lists his wife’s name as Marie Claude Ciceron but states that her address, including city and US state, telephone and email address are all ‘unknown’.

Furthermore, there are no links to anyone of that name in any of his public records.

In a financial affidavit attached to his petition Solages states that he has no job, no monthly income, no credit cards, no savings and not a single dollar’s worth of assets.

That is despite Solages operating a Florida-based business entitled FWA SA A JACMEL AVAN INC, which is described as an economic empowerment charity.

He also has a business named EJS Maintenance and Repair which filed an annual report in May, according to Florida corporations records.

Virtually nothing is known about Joseph, meanwhile, who Haitian authorities said lived at one point in Miami.

Deputy justice of the peace Judge Clément Noël told Le Nouvelliste Friday that Joseph and Solages confessed to being part of a mission ‘to arrest President Jovenel Moïse, within the framework of the execution of a mandate of an investigating judge and not to kill him.’

Solages said he ‘found this job on the internet’, Noël told the outlet.

Authorities are now investigating if the plot was an inside job with the president’s key security personnel facing interrogation.

Officials said they are still looking for the ‘intellectual authors’ of the plot. National Police Director Leon Charles said ‘we have the physical perpetrators in hand and we are looking for the instigators.’

The President of Haiti Jovenel Moise was assassinated by gunmen claiming to be DEA agents in a nighttime raid on his home that also left his wife seriously injured, according to reports (pictured with his wife Martine in October 2018)

The President of Haiti Jovenel Moise was assassinated by gunmen claiming to be DEA agents in a nighttime raid on his home that also left his wife seriously injured, according to reports (pictured with his wife Martine in October 2018)

Police lined up the 17 assassination suspects, including two American citizens and 15 Colombians, behind a table displaying an array of firearms, machetes, sledgehammers and several Colombian passports

Police lined up the 17 assassination suspects, including two American citizens and 15 Colombians, behind a table displaying an array of firearms, machetes, sledgehammers and several Colombian passports

In total, Haiti National Police said there were 28 presumed assassins responsible for Wednesday’s raid, with 17 arrested, three dead and eight still at large.

The remaining 26 are all Colombians with the Colombian Defense Minister Diego Molano saying preliminary information points to them being retired members of the country’s military.

Key members of the mercenary outfit were in the country for three months preparing for the attack, while others arrived from the Dominican Republic, which Haiti shares a land border with, last month, officials said.

While the public is demanding answers around who is responsible for the death of their president, the nation is also in turmoil over who is the next rightful leader.

Under the constitution, Haiti’s chief justice René Sylvestre would normally take charge after the President’s death – but he died of COVID-19 two weeks ago.

Following Moïse’s slaying, a power struggle has broken out between Interim Prime Minister Claude Joseph and Prime Minister-elect Ariel Henry.

Moïse’s assassination came just one day after he named Henry as the new prime minister, who would have replaced Joseph in a matter of days.

However, Joseph assumed sole power of the embattled country, declaring a ‘state of siege’ granting him absolute authority hours after the president’s murder.

Henry – who has the backing of many opposition politicians – said he does not consider Joseph the legitimate prime minister and he should revert to the role of foreign minister.

President Jovenel Moise battled deadly riots as he oversaw massive inflation, food and fuel shortages as he clung onto power

President Jovenel Moise battled violent protests as he oversaw massive inflation, food and fuel shortages in Haiti since taking power in 2017.

The poorest country in the Americas has failed to establish a working democracy since overthrowing the Duvalier dictatorship in the late 1980s.

Moise, a former auto parts salesman, took office with just 600,000 votes in the country of 11 million and faced an uphill task in holding onto his mandate.

In 2019, he faced fury over fuel and food shortages amid steep currency devaluation and corruption allegations. At least 17 people were killed and hundreds were injured in the riots. 

The anger rumbled on into the following year as Moise refused to hold elections, claiming that his five-year presidential term wasn’t due to run out until 2022. 

Haiti has struggled to achieve political stability since a popular uprising in 1986 ended 28 years of dynastic dictatorship by Francois ‘Papa Doc’ Duvalier and his son Jean-Claude ‘Baby Doc’ Duvalier.

The last few decades have been marked by coups, unrest and foreign interventions.

Only two presidents have managed to serve their entire term. 

Successive governments have failed to spark real development in the island nation that has to regularly contend with deadly natural disasters from hurricanes to earthquakes.

The country had received much aid in the wake of the 2010 quake that killed around 300,000, but that has tapered off of late.

Moise, however, failed to cut expenses, meaning the budget deficit deepened to record levels.

The local currency depreciated against the dollar and inflation was rampant. 

More than half of the population lives below the poverty line, surviving on less than 2.4 U.S. dollars a day, according to the World Bank.

Allegations in a report by the Superior Court of Auditors of the embezzlement of billions of dollars by public officials and those close to them, including Moise before he became president, have also sparked ire.

The PetroCaribe program included a fund for infrastructure and social projects in member countries. Opposition politicians say no serious projects were ever completed.

Moise, whom some opposition members accuse of buying votes in parliament for his prime minister nominees, has denied any wrongdoing, but his government has failed to investigate further.

Haiti ranked 161 from 180 countries in Transparency International’s 2018 global survey of corruption. 

As a result, many Haitians have lost faith in politics. Only 21 percent of the electorate turned out for the last presidential election in 2016.

Opposition politicians say that fact undermines the legitimacy of the presidency of Moise, a former businessman with little prior political experience.

But they have themselves failed to get voters out to polling booths, instead resorting to disrupting parliament and calling for street protests, making Haiti hard to govern.

Moise took few public steps to address peoples’ grievances, leading to massive unrest in recent years, including riots in February.   


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