US

America’s COVID-19 death toll now surpasses the April peak

The current seven-day rolling average of COVID-19 deaths in the United States has now surpassed what it was during the initial April peak – as America suffered its deadliest week since April with 15,658 deaths.

The US recorded 1,404 deaths and 192,299 new coronavirus cases yesterday, while the number of people currently hospitalized reached a record 102,148. 

Deaths across the country, which have been rising rapidly since last month, are now currently averaging 2,200 per day.

During the initial peak of the virus in April, the highest seven-day rolling average was just over 2,000.  

In the last week, 15,658 Americans have died from COVID-19 – making it the deadliest week in the pandemic since April. 

The number of new cases has surpassed 200,000 every day in the last seven days with more than 1 million cases reported in the first week of December alone. 

Deaths across the country, which have been rising rapidly since last month, are now currently averaging 2,200 per day. During the initial peak of the virus in April, the highest seven-day rolling average was just over 2,000. The US recorded 1,404 deaths yesterday

In the last week, every state apart from Utah and Montana have reported an increase in deaths compared to the previous seven days. South Carolina saw a 204 percent increase in deaths with 213 new fatalities. Vermont's death toll spiked by 200 percent with 12 new deaths in the last week. The Dakotas, however, continue to record the most deaths per 100,000 across the country

In the last week, every state apart from Utah and Montana have reported an increase in deaths compared to the previous seven days. South Carolina saw a 204 percent increase in deaths with 213 new fatalities. Vermont’s death toll spiked by 200 percent with 12 new deaths in the last week. The Dakotas, however, continue to record the most deaths per 100,000 across the country

While fatalities surged back in April during the initial peak, they did not rise at the same rates when infections started surging across the Sun Belt states in summer.

Fatalities, which are a lagging indicator and can rise weeks after cases are diagnosed, remained below an average of 1,000 per day until a month ago when hospitals – mostly in the Midwest – warned they were reaching capacity. 

Hospitalizations have consistently set single-day highs since late October and are currently rising in 31 states compared to 14 days ago, according to the COVID Tracking Project.  

In the last week, every state apart from Utah and Montana have reported an increase in deaths compared to the previous seven days, according to a Reuters tally of state and county reports. 

South Carolina saw a 204 percent increase in deaths with 213 new fatalities. Vermont’s death toll spiked by 200 percent with 12 new deaths in the last week. 

The Dakotas, however, continue to record the most deaths per 100,000 across the country.  

In the last week, South Dakota recorded an average of 2.7 deaths per 100,000 and North Dakota followed with 1.8 deaths, according to CDC data. 

The number of new cases has surpassed 200,000 every day in the last seven days. The US recorded 192,299 new coronavirus cases yesterday

The number of new cases has surpassed 200,000 every day in the last seven days. The US recorded 192,299 new coronavirus cases yesterday 

Rhode Island is currently the worst affected state across the country with an average of 110 cases per 100,000 people in the last week, the CDC data shows. 

It is the first time in several weeks that a non-Midwestern state has not topped the list.

Indiana follows with 103 cases, Nebraska with 99 cases and South Dakota with 98 cases. 

Based on yesterday’s data alone, Connecticut had the highest number of cases per capita with 2,280 infections per one million, a COVID Tracking Project analysis found.    

Government and health officials have warned that cases and deaths will rise further in the coming weeks and months due to people traveling and gathering with family – against the advice of health experts. 

Dr Anthony Fauci said yesterday that ‘the middle of January could be a really dark time’ because the Thanksgiving surge will be compounded by Christmas.

Across the country, 10.5 percent of tests came back positive for the virus, up from 9.8 percent the prior week, according to data from The COVID Tracking Project.

Out of 50 states, 34 had a positive test rate of 10 percent or higher. The highest rates were Iowa and Idaho at 52 percent and South Dakota at 50 percent.

The World Health Organization considers positive test rates above 5 percent concerning because it suggests there are more cases in the community that have not yet been uncovered.

The number of people currently hospitalized reached a record 102,148. Hospitalizations have consistently set single-day highs since late October and are currently rising in 31 states compared to 14 days ago

The number of people currently hospitalized reached a record 102,148. Hospitalizations have consistently set single-day highs since late October and are currently rising in 31 states compared to 14 days ago

More than half the United States - or 31 states - have experienced an increase in hospitalizations over the last two weeks, according to the COVID Tracking Project

More than half the United States – or 31 states – have experienced an increase in hospitalizations over the last two weeks, according to the COVID Tracking Project 

In an interview with CNN Monday morning, Fauci said the numbers being seen now could be just the beginning of what occurred over Thanksgiving due to gatherings and travel. 

Fauci has warned the Christmas period could be even worse given it goes for a longer period thanks the Thanksgiving weekend.

‘I think it could be even more of a challenge than what we saw with Thanksgiving,’ he said. ‘This may be even more compounded because it’s a longer holiday.’  

While the true toll of Thanksgiving is yet to be seen, Fauci said it’s likely the country will see a ‘surge upon a surge’.

‘What we likely will see is either a blip upon a blip, or what I referred to last week as a surge upon a surge. How large it’s going to be is really going to vary across the country,’ he said.  

‘We’re probably just on the beginning of seeing what occurred at Thanksgiving.

‘I hope that people realize that and understand that as difficult as this is, nobody wants to modify – if not essentially shut down – their holiday season, but we are in a very critical time in this country right now.

‘We’ve got to not walk away from the facts and the data… This is tough going for all of us.’He noted that restrictions being put in place across parts of the country could potentially blunt the surges. 

About half of the states across the country have enacted new restrictions in the last month as cases, deaths and hospitalizations hit record levels nationwide. Fourteen states do not mandate masks. 

Rhode Island is currently the worst affected state across the country with an average of 110 cases per 100,000 people in the last week. It is the first time in several weeks that a non-Midwestern state has not topped the list

Rhode Island is currently the worst affected state across the country with an average of 110 cases per 100,000 people in the last week. It is the first time in several weeks that a non-Midwestern state has not topped the list

Indiana is ranked second with an average of 103 cases per 100,000 in the last week. The state has recorded 1.2 deaths per 100,000 in the past week, which is the eighth highest state

Indiana is ranked second with an average of 103 cases per 100,000 in the last week. The state has recorded 1.2 deaths per 100,000 in the past week, which is the eighth highest state 

Nebraska has the third highest cases and deaths per capita in the country. The state recorded an average of 99 cases per 100,000 in the last week and 1.6 deaths

Nebraska has the third highest cases and deaths per capita in the country. The state recorded an average of 99 cases per 100,000 in the last week and 1.6 deaths

South Dakota recorded 98.6 cases per 100,000 in the last week. The state currently has the highest deaths per capita with 2.7 deaths per 100,000 in the last week

South Dakota recorded 98.6 cases per 100,000 in the last week. The state currently has the highest deaths per capita with 2.7 deaths per 100,000 in the last week

Utah recorded 97.6 cases per 100,000 in the last week. While deaths are rising across the state, Utah's deaths per capita are low compared to others with 0.3 fatalities per 100,000 in the last week

Utah recorded 97.6 cases per 100,000 in the last week. While deaths are rising across the state, Utah’s deaths per capita are low compared to others with 0.3 fatalities per 100,000 in the last week

New Mexico recorded 1.4 deaths per 100,000 in the last week and 86.4 cases per capita

New Mexico recorded 1.4 deaths per 100,000 in the last week and 86.4 cases per capita 

North Dakota is second behind South Dakota with highest deaths per capita. The state recorded 1.8 deaths per 100,000 in the last week. While cases are decreasing, North Dakota is still seeing 76.9 cases per capita

North Dakota is second behind South Dakota with highest deaths per capita. The state recorded 1.8 deaths per 100,000 in the last week. While cases are decreasing, North Dakota is still seeing 76.9 cases per capita

Iowa has the fourth highest deaths per capita in the current. The state recorded 1.4 deaths per 100,000 in the last week and 74.1 cases per capita

Iowa has the fourth highest deaths per capita in the current. The state recorded 1.4 deaths per 100,000 in the last week and 74.1 cases per capita


Source link

Related Articles

Back to top button