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Boxer Julio César Chavez says he got cocaine from drug lords including El Chapo after 1992 victory

Mexico boxing legend Julio César Chávez says he demanded cocaine from some of the world’s most notorious drug lords after they showed up to a victory party without any.

Chávez said he was celebrating his win over Héctor ‘Macho’ Camacho at the Thomas & Mack Center on the night of September 9, 1992, and had a meeting with a veritable who’s who of drug bosses.

Chávez said that Joaquín ‘El Chapo‘ Guzmán, Ismael ‘El Mayo’ Zambada, Héctor Luis ‘El Güero’ Palma, Juan José ‘El Azul’ Esparragoza, Amado ‘El Señor de los Cielos’ Carrillo, and the Arellano Félix brothers all showed up to mark his victory.

But the boxer says he told them ‘to go to hell’ because they did not have enough cocaine for his personal use.

In a recent interview with Mexican journalist Yordi Rosado, he said the drug lords were only worried asking him questions about the unanimous decision win against against Camacho. 

Chávez said: ‘There were about one thousand years worth of jail time the day I defeated Macho Camacho. And they all wanted to meet me and I was standing in the middle. 

‘All of them were talking about how the Macho Camacho fight played out until I got upset. All I wanted was coke. 

‘There were about 300 armed b*****ds there, but nobody had coke. So I told them, “Since nobody brought coke, you can all go to hell”.’

The drug lords abided by his demands and instructed their henchmen to fetch enough cocaine to continue the celebration.

Julio César Chávez (pictured) told Mexican journalist Yordi Rosado that he first used cocaine following his September 12, 1992 victory over Puerto Rican boxing legend Héctor ‘Macho’ Camacho in Las Vegas

Julio César Chávez (right) improved to 82-0 with a win over Héctor 'Macho' Camacho on September 12, 1992 in Las Vegas

Julio César Chávez (right) improved to 82-0 with a win over Héctor ‘Macho’ Camacho on September 12, 1992 in Las Vegas

The win was the World Boxing Council super lightweight champion’s 82nd consecutive victory.

Chávez told the interviewer that while has always been open about his ties to the infamous drug lords, he eventually forged the relationships with some of the world’s biggest drug suppliers because he had no other choice.

The friendships came along with gifts of more drugs and jewelry, which he was forced to accept.

‘So they would send for me and if I did not go, they would take me. So it was better to be friends than enemies,’ he said.

‘That’s why I am I alive, because I never got in their business. They knew I (did not) dedicate myself to that. I was all about the sport.’ 

Francisco Arellano Félix (pictured) founded the Tijuana Cartel, or Arellano-Félix Cartel as it is also known. Mexican boxing great Julio César Chávez considered him a dear friend. Chávez says he still has the diamond boxing glove pendant that the drug lord gifted him

Francisco Arellano Félix (pictured) founded the Tijuana Cartel, or Arellano-Félix Cartel as it is also known. Mexican boxing great Julio César Chávez considered him a dear friend. Chávez says he still has the diamond boxing glove pendant that the drug lord gifted him

Joaquín 'El Chapo' Guzmán was one of the many Mexican drug lords who had a friendship with legendary boxer Julio César Chávez

Joaquín ‘El Chapo’ Guzmán was one of the many Mexican drug lords who had a friendship with legendary boxer Julio César Chávez

Two weeks following the eventful gathering – which was held at a location that was not disclosed by Chávez – some of the Mexican drug trafficking organizations who were present were involved in a violent conflict much to the dismay of the Mexican boxer.

‘They always respected me. Even though they had a fallout, I was in the middle,’ Chávez said. ‘I was very good friends with the Arellano Félix (brothers) because I met (Francisco) ‘El Pancho’ Arellano through them.’

El Pancho, who was executed in 2013, once gifted Chávez a pair of diamond boxing pendants worth $80,000 which he still owns.

Juan José 'El Azul' Esparragoza (pictured) is considered one of the leaders of the Sinaloa Cartel. He was one of the drug lords who met with Mexican boxing legend Julio César Chávez following his September 12, 1992 victory over Héctor 'Macho' Camacho

Juan José ‘El Azul’ Esparragoza (pictured) is considered one of the leaders of the Sinaloa Cartel. He was one of the drug lords who met with Mexican boxing legend Julio César Chávez following his September 12, 1992 victory over Héctor ‘Macho’ Camacho

Ismael 'El Mayo' Zambada, co-founder of the Sinaloa Cartel with Joaquín 'El Chapo' Guzmán, remains on-the-run and has never been arrested

Ismael ‘El Mayo’ Zambada, co-founder of the Sinaloa Cartel with Joaquín ‘El Chapo’ Guzmán, remains on-the-run and has never been arrested

Mexican drug lord Hector "El Guero" Palma, one of the founders of the Sinaloa Cartel. He served almost a decade in a U.S. prison and was deported to Mexico in 2016

Mexican drug lord Hector “El Guero” Palma, one of the founders of the Sinaloa Cartel. He served almost a decade in a U.S. prison and was deported to Mexico in 2016

The post-fight party marked the first time Chávez tried cocaine thanks to the Mexican cartels and provided a glimpse of how his life and career started to spiral out of control.

‘When I fought with Macho Camacho it was crazy. I felt that I had already won everything. I already had more than 20 million dollars in the bank. I had yachts. I had a private plane. I had mansions,’ Chavez said. 

‘Well I had everything that a human being wishes to have in life. Sometimes I felt lonely. I was always surrounded by a lot of people. I couldn’t walk in the street because people were harassing me so much at that time. It was crazy.’

But the constant use of alcohol mixed with cocaine would begin to take their toll on his professional and personal life.

It led to multiple sleepless nights in which the married boxing champion partied and slept with numerous women in Mexico. 

Chávez remembered overdosing many times on cocaine, including one incident when he he was rushed to a local hospital after throwing up blood. 

He was conscious enough that he placed a cocaine delivery order for his workers who were standing by his bedside.

Chavez remembered being on cocaine a month before his first professional loss as a boxer to Frankie Randall on May 7, 1994 at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas.

Chavez remembered being on cocaine a month before his first professional loss as a boxer to Frankie Randall on May 7, 1994 at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas.

Chavez remembered being on cocaine a month before his first professional loss as a boxer – and the end of a 90-win streak – to Frankie Randall on May 7, 1994 at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas.

He only decided to cut off using the drug three days before the fight to clear his system out for the pre-fight drug test prior to the weigh in.

‘I kept winning because I was a very nice fighter. But when I lost to Frankie Randall, it was a very sad thing to be honest, because there I realized what I was really worth,’ Chávez said. 

‘Because when I lost I looked around me and I saw people crying. I said, ‘B*****d, I lost.’ I couldn’t believe it. I lost.’


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