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Catholic priest at Capitol protest captured on video saying he performed ‘exorcism’

A Catholic priest from Nebraska was filmed talking about how he performed an ‘exorcism’ at the US Capitol during the January 6 MAGA riots. 

The Rev David Fulton, a pastor at two churches in central Nebraska, was among the thousands of Donald Trump supporters who gathered at the Capitol in protest as Congress met to certify Joe Biden‘s victory. 

Footage has now emerged of Fulton speaking to a videographer, Eddie Becker, about how he performed an exorcism on a demon named ‘Baphomet’ who he said is ‘dissolving the country’.  

Becker told the Omaha World-Herald that Fulton was walking toward the west side of the Capitol when the pair struck up a conversation at about 3.25pm, after other rioters had already breached the building. 

Fulton, who was wearing a clerical collar, says that he’s a ‘Roman Catholic’ from Nebraska and holds up a book entitled: ‘Minor Exorcisms and Deliverance Prayers in Latin and in English’.

‘Got this going,’ Fulton says, pointing to the book. ‘Got these exorcism prayers going, there’s priests that’re using them.’ 

The priest went on to explain how he’d carried out the exorcism, saying: ‘We’ll see, we’ll see what effect [it had].’  

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Video shows the Rev David Fulton, a pastor at two churches in central Nebraska, talking about how he performed an ‘exorcism’ at the US Capitol during the January 6 MAGA riots

Fulton is seen speaking to videographer Eddie Becker about his purported exorcism on a demon named Baphomet who he said is 'dissolving the country'.

Fulton is seen speaking to videographer Eddie Becker about his purported exorcism on a demon named Baphomet who he said is ‘dissolving the country’.

As he speaks Fulton holds up a book entitled: 'Minor Exorcisms and Deliverance Prayers in Latin and in English'

As he speaks Fulton holds up a book entitled: ‘Minor Exorcisms and Deliverance Prayers in Latin and in English’

Fulton, who is a pastor at St Michael’s Catholic Church in Central City and St Peter’s Catholic Church in Fullerton, according to the World-Herald, claimed that he learned about the demon ‘Baphomet’ from Chad Ripperger, a priest and self-proclaimed exorcist with ties to Nebraska.  

A priest by the same name made headlines last November after live-streaming exorcisms aimed at rooting out ‘voter fraud’ on YouTube. 

Fulton echoed unfounded claims of voter fraud during his conversation with Becker as he praised the ‘awesome’ crowd gathered in DC.   

‘It’s good to see so many people who care about the country, concerned about the country, people who know about what’s going on, the obvious steal,’ Fulton said. 

‘And hopefully we’ll be able to take this into our local communities and do something.’

Fulton is a pastor at St Michael's Catholic Church in Central City and St Peter's Catholic Church in Fullerton, according to the Omaha World-Herald

Fulton is a pastor at St Michael’s Catholic Church in Central City and St Peter’s Catholic Church in Fullerton, according to the Omaha World-Herald

The chancellor for the Archdiocese of Omaha, Deacon Tim McNeil, reacted to Becker’s video by saying Fulton’s comments do not reflect the views of the archdiocese – and emphasizing that Fulton is not a ‘trained exorcist’. 

McNeil said he was informed of Fulton’s presence at the Capitol riots a few days after he returned home. 

When asked by church officials if he had entered the Capitol illegally, Fulton said he left before any violence broke out and didn’t learn about it until he returned to his hotel, McNeil said. 

That account doesn’t match the video, in which Fulton directly indicates that he had been inside the Capitol as he stands among the chaotic crowds. 

After viewing the video, church officials asked Fulton about his exorcism comments, according to a statement from the archdiocese. 

‘Fr. Fulton has since clarified that, contrary to his YouTube interview, he did not attempt a formal exorcism, but led others in prayer,’ the statement said. 

‘Fr. Fulton should not have claimed to have special and particular knowledge about demonic activity.’

‘The Rite of Exorcism may only be performed by a priest duly trained and appointed by his bishop.’ 

The archdiocese said that Fulton was not sanctioned or punished for attending the riots or purporting to perform an exorcism.  

‘Fulton did not break any civil or ecclesial laws while in Washington, DC,’ the statement read. ‘He attended the rally as a private citizen.’

But McNeil said that Fulton showed ‘poor judgment’, and that Omaha Archbishop George Lucas was ‘very upset’ with the priest.  

‘He should not have been there dressed as a priest. It was a misuse of his priestly ministry,’ Lucas told the World-Herald via McNeil.  

‘Whether or not Fr. Fulton broke any laws, I condemn his participation in the event in the strongest terms.’ 

The Archdiocese of Omaha condemned Fulton's involvement in the riots but said he has not been sanctioned or punished

The Archdiocese of Omaha condemned Fulton’s involvement in the riots but said he has not been sanctioned or punished

In the video Fulton declined to say his name when asked by Becker, because he was afraid of internet users finding out information about him through a practice known as ‘doxing’.  

‘Yeah, I’m not gonna dox myself,’ he said after asking a friend standing next to him whether he should give his name.  

The friend then told Becker: ‘He’s a good man, he’s a holy priest. Pray for all good holy priests.’ 

After the World-Herald published its first story about Fulton on January 29, the priest defended himself during a homily at St Michael’s Church on Sunday.

Fulton accused Becker of misrepresenting his comments with editing and branded the videographer as ‘anti-Catholic’.  

‘This guy wanted to interview me, and I could tell that he wasn’t … of good intention,’ Fulton of Becker. 

‘But I thought maybe I could lead him to something that could help to evangelize him. And so I tried to find commonalities with what he was saying — he was saying very anti-Catholic stuff.

‘I was trying to lead him to, maybe, information that could maybe change his mind, or at least suppress his anti-Catholicism. And so he edited the video and he ended up weaponizing it.’

Several parishioners are now calling for Fulton to be stripped of his priestly title, according to the World-Herald, as the archdiocese insists it is examining the issue internally. 

WHAT IS BAPHOMET?  

Baphomet – also known as the Sabbatic Goat – is a figure associated in modern times with the Satanic Temple that features a man with the head of a goat and angel wings. 

The name dates back to the 12th century Inquisition in France, when the Catholic Church allegedly tortured members of the Knights Templar who confessed to worshipping a heathen deity called Baphometh.

Some scholars believe ‘Baphometh’ stemmed from ‘Mahomet’ – the Prophet Muhammad. 

The most common image of Baphomet was drawn in 1856 by the French occultist Eliphas Levi, in his book Transcendental Magic: Its Doctrine and Ritual. 

Levi wrote that the image represents a ‘symbolization of the equilibrium of opposites’ – human and animal, male and female, good and evil. 

In the image Baphomet holds two fingers on his right hand up and two on his left down, meaning ‘as above, so below’. On his arms are the Latin words ‘solve’ and ‘coagula’, which translates to ‘dissolve’ and ‘coagulate’. 

The Satanic Temple adopted the figure after its founding in 2012 and heralds it as a symbol of ‘pluralism, diversity, and nonbinary identity’, according to Temple co-founder Lucien Greaves. 

The most common modern image of Baphomet (above) was drawn in 1856 by the French occultist Eliphas Levi

The most common modern image of Baphomet (above) was drawn in 1856 by the French occultist Eliphas Levi 


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