US

Chris Christie’s new book on how to save the Republican Party sells paltry 2,289 copies

Former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie’s new book touting himself as the potential savior of the Republican Party has sold just over 2,000 copies in the week since it was published.  

In its first week available in stores, Christie’s tome titled Republican Rescue has sold just 2,289 copies, according to BookScan data cited by the publishing newsletter Press Run

Press Run author Eric Boehlert called the sales figures a ‘a colossal publishing flop’ and ‘debacle’ for Christie, comparing the dismal sales to the same-week sales of 24,000 for Jonathan Karl’s new political book, Betrayal: The Final Act of the Trump Show.

The meager book sales come despite persistent promotion of the book by Christie, who has appeared on The View, Fox & Friends, The Daily Show, CNBC, and twice on HBO, among others. 

In its first week available in stores, Chris Christie’s tome titled Republican Rescue has sold just 2,289 copies, according to BookScan data

Christie has made a media blitz to support his new book, appearing on CNN (above) as well as The View, Fox & Friends, The Daily Show, CNBC, and twice on HBO

Christie has made a media blitz to support his new book, appearing on CNN (above) as well as The View, Fox & Friends, The Daily Show, CNBC, and twice on HBO 

As of Tuesday, Christie’s book was ranked No. 12,581 in Amazon’s Kindle Store. 

In his new book, Christie argues that the Republican Party must move beyond Donald Trump’s fraud claims about the 2020 election, slamming them as delusional conspiracy theories. 

‘We need to give our supporters facts that will help put all these fantasies to rest, so everyone can focus with clear minds on the issues that really matter. We need to quit wasting our time, our energy and our credibility on claims that won’t ever convince anyone or bring fresh converts onboard,’ Christie wrote in excerpts published by The Guardian.

Christie’s intensive media blitz, as well as his book’s not-so-subtle suggestion that a face like his own should lead the Republican Party, has led to widespread speculation that he is planning another presidential bid in 2024.

The former governor washed out of the Republican presidential primaries in 2016, after which he became one of the first prominent figures in the party to endorse Trump.

In a recent interview with the Associated Press, Christie said he hadn’t made a decision yet about his political future and wouldn’t until after next year’s elections. 

However, he was blunt in saying he would run if he believes he can be elected.

‘If I see a pathway to winning, I’ll run,’ he said. ‘And I feel like I have the skills and the talent and the ability to be able to make a difference in our party and in the country. And I’m certainly, at 59 years old, not ready to retire. But I’m not going to do it if I don’t see a pathway to winning. So that’s why I’m not making any decision now.’

Looming over Christie’s plans is the question of Trump, who has strongly suggested in public and private that he plans to run again. Polls suggest he would easily clinch the nomination, although he’s unlikely to make any commitment until at least the end of 2023. 

In the meantime Christie must test whether his moderate stance, embracing Trump’s policies for the most part but rejecting his character and unproven election fraud claims, will appeal to Republican voters.

Christie's intensive media blitz, as well as his book's not-so-subtle suggestion that a face like his own should lead the Republican Party, has led to widespread speculation that he is planning another presidential bid in 2024

Christie’s intensive media blitz, as well as his book’s not-so-subtle suggestion that a face like his own should lead the Republican Party, has led to widespread speculation that he is planning another presidential bid in 2024

Christie said he hadn't made a decision yet about his political future. However, he was blunt in saying he would run if he believes he can be elected.

Christie said he hadn’t made a decision yet about his political future. However, he was blunt in saying he would run if he believes he can be elected.

In his media blitz, Christie has attempted to walk this narrow path, saying that Trump’s claim he actually won the 2020 election ‘incited’ the January 6 Capitol riot, but that he doesn’t regret voting for the former president twice. 

‘I think everything that he was saying from election night forward incited people to that level of anger,’ the former New Jersey governor told CNN ‘s Dana Bash earlier this month.

‘I don’t think they wouldn’t gone there if they thought the election had been fair,’ he said, after admitting that he wouldn’t have voted for someone else in retrospect simply because Democrats’ policies are ‘so long term bad for the country.’

He also told ABC’s The View that First Lady Melania Trump called him every day after he contracted COVID at a White House reception, while the president himself was only worried about whether Christie would blame him for catching it. 

Speaking to CNN, Christie said Trump’s infamous ‘fight like hell’ speech on January 6 was not the only reason for the subsequent riot, in which Trump supporters stormed the US Capitol building, resulting in the deaths of five people.

Trump, above with Christie in 2017, continues to deny that he lost the 2020 election

Trump, above with Christie in 2017, continues to deny that he lost the 2020 election

'I don’t think they wouldn’t gone there if they thought the election had been fair,' Christie said. Above, Trump telling his supporters to 'fight like hell' before the riot

‘I don’t think they wouldn’t gone there if they thought the election had been fair,’ Christie said. Above, Trump telling his supporters to ‘fight like hell’ before the riot

‘My point is that I think people minimize what happened on the 6th by pointing to the stage,’ Christie said, adding that Trump’s lies about the election results began after Election Day.

Christie ran for the Republican presidential nomination in 2016, criticizing Trump for his mocking statements against disabled people and his ‘ridiculous’ Muslim ban – which Trump later enacted. 

He became an ally after Trump clinched the nomination, joining his transition team and being considered for a possible Cabinet-level position.

In an interview with Axios on HBO on Sunday, Christie said he tried to put a stop to the January 6 riot after seeing how Trump’s supporters were turning violent.

‘I tried to call [Trump]… to give him advice on what I thought he needed to be doing to stop the violence,’ Christie said during an hour-long interview with Axios’ Mike Allen at his New Jersey home.  

‘I called Kellyanne Conway first,’ he said, referring to the former senior counselor to Trump who had resigned four months prior. 

‘And I said to her: “Have you spoken to him?” And she said she had not. And she said: “I think we both need to call him.” And I said: “Absolutely.”‘  


Source link

Related Articles

Back to top button