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Company creates $40 ‘Safe Travels Kit’ with an antimicrobial airplane seat cover

As a growing number of Americans get vaccinated against COVID-19, many are likely to start traveling again — but even once herd immunity is achieved, the pandemic may have some people approaching the risks of travel with new caution.

Certainly, face masks and hand sanitizer aren’t going anywhere, but one company is offering travelers additional peace of mind with their Safe Travels Kit

The kit, which retails for $39.95, includes several items that help prevent the transmission of germs, including an antimicrobial seat cover to provide extra protection against other passengers.

Ready to travel? The $39.95 Safe Travels Kit comes with a washable airplane seat cover and pillowcase made from antimicrobial and hypoallergenic fabric

Necessities: The kit also has a face mask and 85% alcohol sanitizing wipes for wiping down surfaces like armrests, tray tables, buckles, screens, and air vents

Necessities: The kit also has a face mask and 85% alcohol sanitizing wipes for wiping down surfaces like armrests, tray tables, buckles, screens, and air vents

The kit comes with four pieces, including a patent-pending airplane seat cover and pillowcase made from antimicrobial and hypoallergenic fabric. 

The pillowcase can also be used as a tray table cover, while the seat cover works just well in trains and cars.

The pieces are bed-bug proof and reusable, good for up to 40 washes — and both can be monogramed. 

Also in the kit are a surgical mask and 85 per cent alcohol sanitizing wipes for wiping down surfaces like armrests, tray tables, buckles, screens, and air vents.

Everything comes packed together in a washable travel pouch.

Extra safe: As a growing number of Americans get vaccinated against COVID-19, many are likely to start traveling again

Extra safe: As a growing number of Americans get vaccinated against COVID-19, many are likely to start traveling again

For now, the CDC is still warning against all non-essential travel, urging Americans to delay travel and stay home.

For those who must travel, the CDC recommends getting vaccinated if possible, getting tested between one and three days of a trip, wearing a mask in public settings, and washing hands, and avoiding touching one’s eyes, nose, and mouth.  

‘Air travel requires spending time in security lines and airport terminals, which can bring you in close contact with other people and frequently touched surfaces,’ the agency warns.

‘Most viruses and other germs do not spread easily on flights because of how air is circulated and filtered on airplanes. 

‘However, social distancing is difficult on crowded flights and sitting within 6 feet of others, sometimes for hours, may increase your risk of getting COVID-19. 

‘How you get to and from the airport, such as with public transportation and ridesharing, can also increase your chances of being exposed to the virus.’ 

Caution: The CDC is still warning against all non-essential travel; however, experts say it will be safer once people have been immunized

Caution: The CDC is still warning against all non-essential travel; however, experts say it will be safer once people have been immunized

While people who are vaccinated are unlikely to get sick COVID-19, scientists are still learning whether those who are vaccinated can still spread the virus to others.

Early data out of Israel paints a hopeful picture that the vaccine stops transmission — but until there are more concrete numbers, experts are urging those who do decide to travel, even if they have been inoculated, to follow safety precautions.

‘These two vaccines have 94 and 95% protection against serious COVID disease,’ Dr. Chris Beyrer, a professor of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland, told Today

‘It is certainly going to be safer to travel once you’re immunized, but on the other hand, we also do not know the answer to the question of “Are people who have been immunized still infectious for others?” … That’s a very important distinction.’


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