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Coronavirus infections have plummeted by 30% over the last three weeks

Coronavirus cases across the United States are continuing to plummet even as deaths from the virus continue to hold steady.

On Friday, a total of 164,665 new infections were reported, according to data from Johns Hopkins University, which much lower than the 274,703 infections that were recorded just three weeks ago   

Although the Friday total is higher than the totals over the last few days, the figure is closer to what was seen in mid-November before the post-holiday surges. 

What’s more, the seven-day rolling average of new cases currently sits at 158,739, a 30 percent decline from the average three weeks weeks earlier, a DailyMail.com analysis shows.

Forty-four states are seeing a decline in cases, Johns Hopkins data reveals, with just Alabama, Connecticut, Louisiana, Nebraska, Rhode Island and Washington on the upswing. 

A CNN analysis projects that between natural immunity among COVID-19 survivors and people being vaccinated, as little as 12 percent and as many as one-third of the U.S. population may be protected against the virus. 

In addition, the number of people hospitalized has trended lower, falling 21 percent from a peak of 132,474 on January 6 to 104,303, the lowest since December 8, according to data from the COVID Tracking Project. 

The U.S. is soon on track to fall below 100,000 total hospitalizations – a figure not seen since December 1. 

‘Folks are changing behavior. Folks are wearing masks, folks are staying home, and that is resulting in these decreasing cases,’ Interim Austin-Travis County Interim Health Authority Dr Mark Escott told CBS Austin.

However, a total of 3,872 deaths were recorded on Friday, which is the seventh-highest number of fatalities recorded in a single day. 

Experts say that deaths, which rose in 17 of the 50 states last week, are lagging indicator, meaning they can rise weeks after cases and hospitalizations fall. 

On Thursday, a total of 164,665 new coronavirus infections were reported with a seven-day rolling average of 158,739, a 30% decline from the average three weeks earlier

Although the Friday total is higher than the totals over the last few days, the figure is closer to what was seen in mid-November before the post-holiday surges

Although the Friday total is higher than the totals over the last few days, the figure is closer to what was seen in mid-November before the post-holiday surges 

Hospitalizations have fallen 21% from a peak of of 132,474 on January 6 to 104,303, the lowest since December 8 and are expected to fall below 100,000 for the first time since December 1

Hospitalizations have fallen 21% from a peak of of 132,474 on January 6 to 104,303, the lowest since December 8 and are expected to fall below 100,000 for the first time since December 1

Currently, 44 states are seeing a decline in cases with just Connecticut, Kansas and Rhode Island trending upward, according to Johns Hopkins data

Currently, 44 states are seeing a decline in cases with just Connecticut, Kansas and Rhode Island trending upward, according to Johns Hopkins data 

Deaths continue to remain high with a total of 3,872 deaths recorded on Friday, but because it is a lagging indicator, it is expected to remain high for several weeks even as cases drop

Even though deaths remain high, public health experts have been seen newly confirmed cases and hospitalizations falling over the last several weeks.

This has led to many predict that the latest surge is over. But why?

According to data from Bloomberg and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 26.1 million people – or about 7.9 percent of the U.S. population – have been vaccinated against COVID-19.

More than 21.6 million have received one dose, which clinical trial data has shown can offer up to 50 percent of protection – and 4.2 have received both doses. 

What’s more, several studies have shown that people who fall ill with coronavirus have immunity for at least some time. So far, 25.7 million case – 7.8 percent of the population – have been reported, according to Johns Hopkins.

However, most experts believe this is a severe undercount and only presents a portion of the true number of infections in the country.

Recent CDC models estimated that between February and January 2020, there were closer to 83.1 million infections in the U.S. In addition, to the 5.6 million cases reported in January, that means 87.7 million people have contracted the virus since the pandemic began.

Between 7.9% people receiving at least one shot of the vaccine  (above) and an estimated 26% of the population recovered from the virus, as many one-third of Americans could have soe kind of herd immunity

Between 7.9% people receiving at least one shot of the vaccine  (above) and an estimated 26% of the population recovered from the virus, as many one-third of Americans could have soe kind of herd immunity

This also means likely more than 26 percent of the population may actually be protected.

When combined with the number of people who have been vaccinated that comes out to a total of 113.7, about one-third of the U.S. population who may have some level of immunity against the virus.

It also means that the virus cannot so easily spread throughout the population because now it may be reaching people who are immune to it.  

‘There’s a better chance you know someone who had it,’ Adriane Casalotti, chief of government and public affairs for the National Association of County and City Health Officials, told Kaiser Health News.

The estimates, which were conducted by, CNN do not account for any people who have both recovered and received the vaccine. 

With  cases and hospitalizations on the decline, some U.S. states have slightly eased some of the tightest public health restrictions. 

California recorded its second-highest number of deaths, but the nearly 17,000 new cases reported on Thursday are about one-third the mid-December peak of 54,000

California recorded its second-highest number of deaths, but the nearly 17,000 new cases reported on Thursday are about one-third the mid-December peak of 54,000

In California, Governor Gavin Newsom this week lifted a stay-at-home order that had affected much of the most populous U.S. state. 

‘We’re seeing a flattening of the curve – everything that should be up is up, everything that should be down is down case rates, positivity rates, hospitalizations, ICUs,’ Newsom said at a virtual news conference. 

The order allows hair salons to open with modifications and permits restaurants to reopen for patio dining. However many restrictions remain, including a ban on indoor worship services that affects most of the state.

Newsom crafted the stay-at-home order in December as coronavirus cases worsened and in anticipation of surges from holiday gatherings. 

He divided the state into five regions and ultimately four of them had the order imposed because their ICU capacity fellow the stat mandated 15 percent. Only rural far Northern California stayed above the threshold. 

The turnaround puts California in a starkly different place than it was last month, when some Southern California hospitals overwhelmed by virus patients were crafting emergency plans for rationing care. 

As the sickest patients die, the death toll has exploded. California reported its second-highest number of COVID-19 deaths on Thursday at 737. The death toll now tops 39,000 and is second only to New York. 

But the number of people in the hospital with COVID-19 has slipped below 16,250 statewide, a drop of more than 20 percent  in two weeks.

The nearly 17,000 new cases reported on Thursday are about one-third the mid-December peak of 54,000. In the last week the state averaged about 21,000 new cases per day, more than 5,000 fewer than the prior week.

The positivity rate for people being tested has been falling for weeks, which means fewer people will end up in hospitals.

In Los Angeles County, the state’s most populous, the seven-day average of daily positive cases hit about 6,560 on January 22 – down from the peak of more than 15,000 on January 8, said county Public Health Department Director Barbara Ferrer. 

On Thursday, the state reported 13,398 new infections with 5.34 percent test positivity rate. This is down from the record-high 19,942 new cases and 6.14 percent positivity rate reported on January 15.

On Thursday, the state reported 13,398 new infections with 5.34 percent test positivity rate. This is down from the record-high 19,942 new cases and 6.14 percent positivity rate reported on January 15.

Meanwhile, in New York, the rate of new COVID-19 cases statewide continues to fall.

On Thursday, the state reported 13,398 new infections with 5.34 percent test positivity rate. This is down from the record-high 19,942 new cases and 6.14 percent positivity rate reported on January 15.  

This lead Governor Andrew Cuomo to announce he was lifting restriction on the state’s 26 so-called  ‘micro clusters’ due to declines in case and hospitalization rates. 

This means several businesses in these areas, such as schools, shops, restaurants and houses of worship, will able to operate at a larger capacity.    

However, Cuomo said he is not ready to lift New York City’s ban on indoor dining, which went into effect in mid-December, despite the fact that that the COVID positivity rate in the city is now around eight percent.  

He is expected to announce a plan on Friday. 

‘I fully understand how difficult it is that they’re closed, not just for the restaurants but all the people who are employed there. On the flip side is how fast this virus can take off,’ Cuomo said. 

‘But we’ll have a plan by the end of the week.’ 

Cuomo may soon be facing the wrath of the state’s Attorney General Letitia James, whose office released a report on Wednesday, finding that the New York State Department of Health may have undercounted nursing home deaths by as much as 50 percent. 

The investigation also revealed that the lack of compliance in nursing homes for infection control protocols put residents at increased risk of harm 

Hospitalizations are on the downward in Connecticut, but the state has struggled to lower case rates with 1,426 new infections reported on Thursday, representing a 5.5% increase over the last seven days

Hospitalizations are on the downward in Connecticut, but the state has struggled to lower case rates with 1,426 new infections reported on Thursday, representing a 5.5% increase over the last seven days

In Rhode Island, 745 new cases were reported on Thursday, marking a 4.6% increase over the last seven days

In Rhode Island, 745 new cases were reported on Thursday, marking a 4.6% increase over the last seven days

In Alabama, 3,648 new cases were recorded on Thursday, which indicates a 4.7% increase over the last seven days and i above the average peak of 3,080 on January 11

In Alabama, 3,648 new cases were recorded on Thursday, which indicates a 4.7% increase over the last seven days and i above the average peak of 3,080 on January 11

However, not all states are on the downward. 

In Connecticut, hospitalizations are on the decline but cases and deaths have been increasing. 

There are currently 1,016 patients hospitalized with the virus, and the state appears to be on track to be below coronavirus hospitalizations for the first time since November 24. 

Meanwhile, there were 1,426 new cases reported on Thursday, marking a more than 5.5 percent increase over the last seven days. 

What’s more, the state is now reporting eight total individuals in the state with the UK variant, one of the highest totals across the country.

‘This new strain, which is considered to be more easily transmitted, is spreading quickly throughout the world, and it’s highly likely that these are not the only eight cases in Connecticut,’ Gov Ned Lamont stated.

‘That is why it is so important that everyone continues taking precautions to prevent transmission of this disease.’

‘The health of Connecticut residents remains our top priority, and our public health officials will continue to closely monitor these cases and any other developments with this contagious virus.’ 

In Rhode Island, another state trending upward, 745 new cases were reported on Thursday, indicating a 4.6 percent increase over the last seven days.

The state is currently trying to lower its daily infection rate, which sits around 98.6 per 100,000. according to Covid Act Now, a consortium of scientists and researchers from Harvard, Stanford and Georgetown Universities.

That’s one of the highest in the U.S.

Deaths are also around the highest they’ve been since early December,

However, like Connecticut, coronavirus-related hospitalizations are decreasing, dropping below 350 for the first time since late November. 

In Alabama, 3,648 new cases were recorded on Thursday, marking a 4.7 percent increase over the last seven days.

This is above the peak average of 3,080 new infections per day reported on January 11, according to data from Yellow Hammer News.

State health officers continue to plead the public to wear masks, practice social distancing and wash their hands thoroughly until enough people receive the vaccine to achieve herd immunity.


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