US

Cow stuck in tree gets rescued after Hurricane Ida

This is the moment New Orleans rescue teams cut free a cow that was swept up into a tree by floodwaters from Hurricane Ida.  

The footage was shot near Florissant on Tuesday morning, days after Ida made landfall as a Category 4 storm, pummeling Louisiana with heavy winds of 150 mph and torrential downpours that led to devastating floods.

The animal can be seen wriggling feebly above waist-high floodwaters as two workers carefully use a chainsaw to trim branches off the tree. 

Ultimately, according to CNN, the cow was saved and is back on its feet. The cow appears surprisingly calm, perhaps exhausted from the ordeal, as they work to set it free. 

Since it was posted on Twitter, the video of the cow rescue has been viewed 14,000 times and received over 100 comments on Facebook

The workers can be seen delicately removing branches from a tree in St. Bernard’s Parish were a cow was swept by floodwaters – the animal has since been successfully rescued

Another 60 heifers had to be rescued from New Orleans’ Plaquemines Parish since the storm hit this week, leaving a trail of destruction in it’s wake.

Many Louisianans were left to wander the streets for food and ice on Tuesday, with 650,000 people without access to clean water and more than a million without electricity two days after Ida battered the Gulf Coast. Energy suppliers have warned that it will take at least three weeks for power to be restored.

Accuweather’s Dr. Joel N. Myers said on Monday that the total economic damage caused by Ida will likely fall between $70billion and $80billion. 

Thus far, 7 have been killed during or as a result of the storm. Today,  Eli Nathaniel Babb and Layton River Ellison, both 19-year-olds who worked with Pike Electric, were fatally electrocuted while helping to restore power in Alabama.

A man walks on the porch of his uncle's hurricane damaged home on Tuesday, two days after Hurricane Ida made landfall in Louisiana

A man walks on the porch of his uncle’s hurricane damaged home on Tuesday, two days after Hurricane Ida made landfall in Louisiana

People wait in line to buy supplies at a Dollar Store that opened despite having no power following Hurricane Ida

People wait in line to buy supplies at a Dollar Store that opened despite having no power following Hurricane Ida

People stand in floodwaters, salvaging belongings from their homes in Jean Lafitte, Louisiana

People stand in floodwaters, salvaging belongings from their homes in Jean Lafitte, Louisiana

A destroyed home is seen on Monday in the bayou of Little Caillou in Louisiana

A destroyed home is seen on Monday in the bayou of Little Caillou in Louisiana

The Maldonado family travel by boat to their home after it flooded during Hurricane Ida in Barataria, Louisiana

The Maldonado family travel by boat to their home after it flooded during Hurricane Ida in Barataria, Louisiana

A 60-year-old man died in Louisiana on Monday after a tree fell on them in Prairieville, about 15 miles from Baton Rouge, and another victim died while attempting to drive his vehicle through the flooded streets of New Orleans.

Another man in Louisiana was eaten by an alligator while wading through waist-deep floodwater in a shed outside their home, before he fell beneath the water. Authorities have not yet been able to locate him.

Two others were killed Monday night when seven vehicles plunged into a 20-foot-deep hole near Lucedale, Mississippi, where a highway had collapsed after torrential rains.

Among the crash victims was Kent Brown, a ‘well-liked’ 49-year-old father of two, his brother Keith Brown said in a telephone interview on Tuesday. Keith Brown said his brother was in construction but had been out of work for a while. He didn´t know where his brother was headed when the crash happened.    

Accuweather's Dr. Joel N. Myers said on Monday that the total economic damage caused by Ida will likely fall between $70billion and $80billion. Here, a man can be seen taking a break from clearing rubble from his property in Jean Lafitte on Tuesday

Accuweather’s Dr. Joel N. Myers said on Monday that the total economic damage caused by Ida will likely fall between $70billion and $80billion. Here, a man can be seen taking a break from clearing rubble from his property in Jean Lafitte on Tuesday

Dewayne Pellegrin a bowling alley mechanic, cleans up the heavily damaged Bowl South of Louisiana on Tuesday after Ida swept through with 150 mph winds

Dewayne Pellegrin a bowling alley mechanic, cleans up the heavily damaged Bowl South of Louisiana on Tuesday after Ida swept through with 150 mph winds

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards has said he expects the death toll to rise

‘We have a lot of work ahead of us and no one is under the illusion that this is going to be a short process,’ Edwards said as the cleanup and rebuilding began across the soggy region in the oppressive late-summer heat.

Ida was the fifth-strongest hurricane to ever make landfall in the U.S when it barreled across the South. As it moved east into Alabama, it brought snapped trees, flipped vehicles and flooded some streets after it temporarily reversed the Mississippi River’s flow, according to the Alabama News Center.   

It died down as it passed over inland Mississippi. It is now considered a tropical depression as it is headed to the Mid-Atlantic region across southern New York and into New England, where it could bring potentially deadly and damaging flash floods.

Ida was the fifth-strongest hurricane to ever make landfall in the U.S when it barreled across the South. As it moved east into Alabama, it brought snapped trees, flipped vehicles and flooded some streets after it temporarily reversed the Mississippi River's flow, according to the Alabama News Center

Ida was the fifth-strongest hurricane to ever make landfall in the U.S when it barreled across the South. As it moved east into Alabama, it brought snapped trees, flipped vehicles and flooded some streets after it temporarily reversed the Mississippi River’s flow, according to the Alabama News Center

Hurricane Ida died down as it passed over inland Mississippi. It is now considered a tropical depression as it is headed to the Mid-Atlantic region across southern New York and into New England, where it could bring potentially deadly and damaging flash floods

Hurricane Ida died down as it passed over inland Mississippi. It is now considered a tropical depression as it is headed to the Mid-Atlantic region across southern New York and into New England, where it could bring potentially deadly and damaging flash floods


Source link

Related Articles

Back to top button